Follow TV Tropes

Following

History Headscratchers / HowIMetYourMother

Go To



[[AC:Series/HowIMetYourMother]]. Warning: Potential unmarked spoilers ahead.


to:

[[AC:Series/HowIMetYourMother]].
Using first person pronouns is NOT awesome.
Warning: Potential unmarked spoilers ahead.



*** I hate to do it, but I've got to cite UnreliableNarrator here. Ted was listening for Ted Mosby, so he heard it. I really do doubt the actors would say Ted Mosby without asking some questions, and no one else heard it. It makes a lot more sense.

to:

*** I hate to do it, but I've got to cite UnreliableNarrator here. Ted was listening for Ted Mosby, so he heard it. I really do doubt the actors would say Ted Mosby without asking some questions, and no one else heard it. It makes a lot more sense. ~Tropers/FunSunnyDayz



*** His damages would be the damage of his character, I guess[[note]]Not a defamation lawyer, [[CaptainObvious duh]], cause it's a nasty area. Yeck[[/note]]? If Ted could show Tony had based the film largely on real events involving him, and not gotten his permission to do so, and gone and portrayed Ted is a super-crappy way, it wouldn't just get "thrown out of court".[[note]]Especially considering Tony apparently made a nice pile of cash from it[[/note]] Of course, the above troper was right with UnreliableNarrator, in that the real movie was probably only barely based on events, with his memory noticing and blowing things all out of proportion. [[ItsAllAboutMe This is Ted]] we're talking about here.

to:

*** His damages would be the damage of his character, I guess[[note]]Not a defamation lawyer, [[CaptainObvious duh]], cause it's a nasty area. Yeck[[/note]]? If Ted could show Tony had based the film largely on real events involving him, and not gotten his permission to do so, and gone and portrayed Ted is a super-crappy way, it wouldn't just get "thrown out of court".[[note]]Especially considering Tony apparently made a nice pile of cash from it[[/note]] Of course, the above troper was right with UnreliableNarrator, in that the real movie was probably only barely based on events, with his memory noticing and blowing things all out of proportion. [[ItsAllAboutMe This is Ted]] we're talking about here. ~Tropers/{{Grimace}}



*** I think he would probably be able to find a lawyer to take the case on. This was, apparently, the fifth highest-grossing films of all time, and it was, UnreliableNarrator aside, based entirely on Ted and Stella's relationship. You'd have thought that journalists would be asking about the inspiration for the story, and it wouldn't have been difficult to find out that the screenwriter's wife/girlfriend was named Stella and had previously left an architect at the altar. Frankly, the whole thing [[FictionIsntFair would have been a much bigger deal in real life]].

to:

*** I think he would probably be able to find a lawyer to take the case on. This was, apparently, the fifth highest-grossing films of all time, and it was, UnreliableNarrator aside, based entirely on Ted and Stella's relationship. You'd have thought that journalists would be asking about the inspiration for the story, and it wouldn't have been difficult to find out that the screenwriter's wife/girlfriend was named Stella and had previously left an architect at the altar. Frankly, the whole thing [[FictionIsntFair would have been a much bigger deal in real life]]. ~Tropers/FELH2



*** Like someone mentioned above: Ted may be aware of the StreisandEffect. If I remember correctly, he initially hopes that everyone will forget the movie pretty soon, and is quite annoyed after it becomes a mega hit and thus small talk topic # 1 for quite some time.
*** It's definitly defemation of character. I literally just saw this episode tonight and it bugged me to no end that Tony felt the need to write the movie even though he and Ted seemed to get on quite well given the situation in season 3/4. Unofrutnately it seems Ted has to simply ignore the film, while the character is meant to be him - the film itself is laughably bad and RuleOfFunny is the only thing that makes it popular. I think by the end, as previous tropers have suggested, Ted wouldn't be the guy to sue - and at the episode's finish he's accepted his emotional baggage and no longer cares.

to:

*** Like someone mentioned above: Ted may be aware of the StreisandEffect. If I remember correctly, he initially hopes that everyone will forget the movie pretty soon, and is quite annoyed after it becomes a mega hit and thus small talk topic # 1 for quite some time.
time. ~Tropers/LobsterMagnus
*** It's definitly defemation of character. I literally just saw this episode tonight and it bugged me to no end that Tony felt the need to write the movie even though he and Ted seemed to get on quite well given the situation in season 3/4. Unofrutnately it seems Ted has to simply ignore the film, while the character is meant to be him - the film itself is laughably bad and RuleOfFunny is the only thing that makes it popular. I think by the end, as previous tropers have suggested, Ted wouldn't be the guy to sue - and at the episode's finish he's accepted his emotional baggage and no longer cares. ~Tropers/{{Cin}}



** And I might be mistaken but because Ted's name was changed in the film, he can't sue for defamation. The film depicts a fictional character inspired by Ted, but it's not a biopic or anything that could encourage the public to think this was a representation of him. Defamation covers: information that affects someone's good name, is presented in public form and is completely untrue. And if the information was believed to be true when it was put out there, it's a murkier issue. The plot doesn't affect Ted's good name, because the character does not have the same name as him and it's presented as a work of fiction. A figure in a biopic can sue if they feel they're not being depicted faithfully - Lana Tisdel sued the producers of ''Film/BoysDontCry'' for depicting her as an alcoholic, but they used her real name and dramatised the events as they happened.

to:

** And I might be mistaken but because Ted's name was changed in the film, he can't sue for defamation. The film depicts a fictional character inspired by Ted, but it's not a biopic or anything that could encourage the public to think this was a representation of him. Defamation covers: information that affects someone's good name, is presented in public form and is completely untrue. And if the information was believed to be true when it was put out there, it's a murkier issue. The plot doesn't affect Ted's good name, because the character does not have the same name as him and it's presented as a work of fiction. A figure in a biopic can sue if they feel they're not being depicted faithfully - Lana Tisdel sued the producers of ''Film/BoysDontCry'' for depicting her as an alcoholic, but they used her real name and dramatised the events as they happened. ~Tropers/{{Fearlessnikki}}



** Maybe Robin just wanted to be absolutely sure? This doesn't paint her in the best light but if she did take a home test first (it's been a while since I saw the episode so I can't remember) then maybe she didn't want to risk Kevin seeing it? Home tests can give false results, so going to a doctor is a good way to be certain - especially since if she ''is'' pregnant then she will have to tell Kevin everything. So maybe Robin didn't feel like waiting indefinitely for her period, which would decide what course of action she had to take next with Kevin.

to:

** Maybe Robin just wanted to be absolutely sure? This doesn't paint her in the best light but if she did take a home test first (it's been a while since I saw the episode so I can't remember) then maybe she didn't want to risk Kevin seeing it? Home tests can give false results, so going to a doctor is a good way to be certain - especially since if she ''is'' pregnant then she will have to tell Kevin everything. So maybe Robin didn't feel like waiting indefinitely for her period, which would decide what course of action she had to take next with Kevin. ~Tropers/{{Fearlessnikki}}



* So, why does Ted never threaten to play the "Barney was grinding with his cousin" card when Barney gets out of line? I can think of lots of opportunities, most recently when Barney was blackmailing him with the thermos incident to get Ted to speak highly of him to Nora.

to:

* So, why does Ted never threaten to play the "Barney was grinding with his cousin" card when Barney gets out of line? I can think of lots of opportunities, most recently when Barney was blackmailing him with the thermos incident to get Ted to speak highly of him to Nora. ~Tropers/{{Wackd}}



** Citizenship is specific to each country, and it is possible to have US citizenship and another (I myself have duel US/Brazilian citizenship) but this is only possible under very specific circumstances. In my case, I was born overseas to US citizens, so each was conferred automatically (place of birth conferred one, parents the other). However, when you apply for US citizenship, one of the requirements is that you renounce all other citizenships, therefore Robin could not have kept her Canadian passport while obtaining the US one.

to:

** Citizenship is specific to each country, and it is possible to have US citizenship and another (I myself have duel US/Brazilian citizenship) but this is only possible under very specific circumstances. In my case, I was born overseas to US citizens, so each was conferred automatically (place of birth conferred one, parents the other). However, when you apply for US citizenship, one of the requirements is that you renounce all other citizenships, therefore Robin could not have kept her Canadian passport while obtaining the US one. ~Tropers/Laserviking42



* Confusing in-universe but more of a complaint out-of-universe, I noticed that the child actor who plays one of Ted's nephews in "How Lily Stole Christmas" is the same child actor who ''plays'' a child actor in-universe as Barney's fake son in "The Stinsons". Even if you explain this by saying the nephew actually did become a child actor, how would Ted not recognize him? I guess we're just meant to assume it's a coincidence, a doppelganger, but it still seems like needlessly lazy casting.
** Ted doesn't seem particularly close to that branch of his family, so Ted not recognizing him isn't impossible. I know I have cousins that I'd never recognize if I passed them in the street -- I shared a math class with a cousin of mine back in high school and didn't realize until we saw each other at the family Christmas party that year. If you only meet someone once or twice a year it's rather understandable.

to:

* Confusing in-universe but more of a complaint out-of-universe, I noticed that the child actor who plays one of Ted's nephews in "How Lily Stole Christmas" is the same child actor who ''plays'' a child actor in-universe as Barney's fake son in "The Stinsons". Even if you explain this by saying the nephew actually did become a child actor, how would Ted not recognize him? I guess we're just meant to assume it's a coincidence, a doppelganger, but it still seems like needlessly lazy casting.
casting. ~Tropers/{{docpotterywood}}
** Ted doesn't seem particularly close to that branch of his family, so Ted not recognizing him isn't impossible. I know I have cousins that I'd never recognize if I passed them in the street -- I shared a math class with a cousin of mine back in high school and didn't realize until we saw each other at the family Christmas party that year. If you only meet someone once or twice a year it's rather understandable. ~Tropers/{{saltyoldbones}}



* She did say she felt bad and wanted to apologize or the like. Personally I think they should have had a episode where she makes it up to him somehow, such as by going on Robin's show and [[ToiletHumor farting with thousands people watching her]].

to:

* She did say she felt bad and wanted to apologize or the like. Personally I think they should have had a episode where she makes it up to him somehow, such as by going on Robin's show and [[ToiletHumor farting with thousands people watching her]]. ~Tropers/{{Bootlebat}}



* Why is Lily having a third child in the finale considered a sexist portrayal of women? If anything it shows how her relationship with Marshall is based on compromise(he wants 4 kids, she wants 2--3 is a middle number). The show doesn't literally say "and then she gave up her art career" nor infer that all she will do is to create 5000 kids for Marshall 24/7, so why do some of the detractors infer that she gets reduced to a 1950s housewife? I myself hated the original finale too but no need to stretch literally everything into UnfortunateImplications and this assertion is borderline stretching the negative to the worst possible interpretation.

to:

* Why is Lily having a third child in the finale considered a sexist portrayal of women? If anything it shows how her relationship with Marshall is based on compromise(he wants 4 kids, she wants 2--3 is a middle number). The show doesn't literally say "and then she gave up her art career" nor infer that all she will do is to create 5000 kids for Marshall 24/7, so why do some of the detractors infer that she gets reduced to a 1950s housewife? I myself hated the original finale too but no need to stretch literally everything into UnfortunateImplications and this assertion is borderline stretching the negative to the worst possible interpretation. ~Tropers/Daniel1559


** And I might be mistaken but because Ted's name was changed in the film, he can't sue for defamation. The film depicts a fictional character inspired by Ted, but it's not a biopic or anything that could encourage the public to think this was a representation of him. Defamation covers: information that affects someone's good name, is presented in public form and is completely untrue. And if the information was believed to be true when it was put out there, it's a murkier issue. The plot doesn't affect Ted's good name, because the character does not have the same name as him and it's presented as a work of fiction. A figure in a biopic can sue if they feel they're not being depicted faithfully - Lana Tisdel sued the producers of ''Film/BoysDontCry'' for depicting her as an alcoholic, but they used her real name and dramatised the events as they happened.




to:

** Or Ted just got his numbers wrong considering it was over twenty years ago.


Added DiffLines:

** AcceptableBreaksFromReality here. Filming wise, shooting scenes with food and drink is a pain because of continuity. If you're doing 5-6 takes of the one scene, you have to make sure the food and drink matches the levels in the previous ones. If they're shooting single camera then the food and drink being out of sync messes up continuity (and thus pedantic nitpickers go even more ballistic). Even if it's multi-cam, there might be a line that was delivered better on take two and then another on take three, so having the food match between takes allows them to edit it in seamlessly. So does it ''really'' matter in the grand scheme of things?


Added DiffLines:

** Other relatives could have bought her dresses as gifts and she wore them to be polite or when her dad was away.


Added DiffLines:

** If it's a tradition then surely that doesn't rule out them packing bubble wrap or something to make sure the bottles don't get smashed.


Added DiffLines:

** Child performers can film at all hours - just not ''as many'' as adults. If the child was only in the studio for a couple of hours, it shouldn't matter what time the interview was filmed.


Added DiffLines:

** Maybe Robin just wanted to be absolutely sure? This doesn't paint her in the best light but if she did take a home test first (it's been a while since I saw the episode so I can't remember) then maybe she didn't want to risk Kevin seeing it? Home tests can give false results, so going to a doctor is a good way to be certain - especially since if she ''is'' pregnant then she will have to tell Kevin everything. So maybe Robin didn't feel like waiting indefinitely for her period, which would decide what course of action she had to take next with Kevin.


Added DiffLines:

** Ted did seem to be a little surprised and annoyed that Robin had known him nearly two years without mentioning that she had been married before. But her reasons were that it ended so badly she has an aversion to going to malls - so Ted was being a supportive boyfriend and trying to understand that she had a good reason to keep it secret. But we don't spend too much time with this, because Marshall soon reveals that Robin ''wasn't'' married.

Added DiffLines:

** Really, the question becomes why Tes calls them "Aunt Lily" and "Aunt Robin" but then mentions "my sister Heather".

Added DiffLines:

**Loretta might have been able to prevent Jerry from seeing Barney when he was 6, but as Barney got older, there would be less and less she could do about it. Plus if Jerry cleaned up his act, he could have pursued legal action for visitation rights (although honestly if he cleaned up his act, he could probably gave just worked arrangements out with Loretta).



to:

**According to her diplomas on the wall in her office, Stella got her Bachelors in chemistry in 1999, one year before Ted's graduation from Wesleyan, and her "doctorate in dermtology" in 2003 from Stanford. This is likely meant to be her general medical degree, with her dermatology certification in 2007, allowing her to practice for one year before we meet her. Her attendance at Stanford indicates either family money or a prodigy. Not to mention, this would have her putting herself through undergrad, med school, internship and residency as a single mother.



** Canadians almost never use the Celsius scale for food preparation. It's one of those Imperial scale holdovers we that persists.

to:

** Canadians almost never use the Celsius scale for food preparation. It's one of those Imperial scale holdovers we that persists.



*** I got a text from someone a few days after their first date saying, "I think I'm in love with you... BOOM, you've been Ted Mosby-ed" and it pretty much ruined the rest of the relationship, so yeah, it is ''that'' bad.


** Plus durring Hurricane Irene a tree fell through a huge part of the house.

to:

** Plus durring during Hurricane Irene a tree fell through a huge part of the house.



* On season 3, "The Chain of Screaming", Marshall says that it's great to fantasize about telling his boss off and then quit, but nobody ever does it. Barney then says "Gary Blaumen did it. A guy I used to work with. The guy is a legend now." Then he tells about how Blaumen was getting screamed at and then he screamed back at his boss, attempted to pee on the table, and quit. He ends the story with all the horrible things that happened to him afterwards, and finishes by saying that he died. After that Blaumen continued to show up on the show, and [[spoiler: on season 9 there is a whole episode about him showing up at Barney & Robin's wedding]]. Does anyone have an explanation? The [[TaranKillam actor that plays Blaumen]] is Creator/CobieSmulders' real life husband, so that is probably one of the reasons he keeps coming back, but that still doesn’t explain it.

to:

* On season 3, "The Chain of Screaming", Marshall says that it's great to fantasize about telling his boss off and then quit, but nobody ever does it. Barney then says "Gary Blaumen did it. A guy I used to work with. The guy is a legend now." Then he tells about how Blaumen was getting screamed at and then he screamed back at his boss, attempted to pee on the table, and quit. He ends the story with all the horrible things that happened to him afterwards, and finishes by saying that he died. After that Blaumen Blauman continued to show up on the show, and [[spoiler: on season 9 there is a whole episode about him showing up at Barney & Robin's wedding]]. Does anyone have an explanation? The [[TaranKillam actor that plays Blaumen]] is Creator/CobieSmulders' real life husband, so that is probably one of the reasons he keeps coming back, but that still doesn’t explain it.



*** Well, the rule was apparently made back when Marshall spilt all those coffee cups over the Fiero, back before he met Ted. Maybe he just considers the road trips a special exception? Plus, they were constantly travelling and only seemed to stop to switch drivers and probably use the loo. They probably thought getting out and going somewhere to eat would waste time on their trip.

to:

*** Well, the rule was apparently made back when Marshall spilt spilled all those coffee cups over the Fiero, back before he met Ted. Maybe he just considers the road trips a special exception? Plus, they were constantly travelling and only seemed to stop to switch drivers and probably use the loo. They probably thought getting out and going somewhere to eat would waste time on their trip.



*** The other's traits all show up again because they're funny and non-intrusive. Keepling Lily's around would shoot eating scenes dead.
*** More importantly, Ted is telling a ''story.'' He's not going to pause his story in the middle to say, "and then Lily continued chewing really loudly." It was a part he hadn't mentioned yet in the wierd narrative that is the show, and so he backtracked to fill it in, just like he does in almost every other episode.

to:

*** The other's traits all show up again because they're funny and non-intrusive. Keepling Keeping Lily's around would shoot eating scenes dead.
*** More importantly, Ted is telling a ''story.'' He's not going to pause his story in the middle to say, "and then Lily continued chewing really loudly." It was a part he hadn't mentioned yet in the wierd weird narrative that is the show, and so he backtracked to fill it in, just like he does in almost every other episode.



*** James does not live in Manhattan, he lives in a more suburban area even prior to his marriage meaning that his visits are few and far between. And despite the closeness of the brothers they may not see each other frequently. This troper is an adult female living in Manhattan a mere four blocks away from her adult brother. This troper sees her brother maybe thrice a year.

to:

*** James does not live in Manhattan, he lives in a more suburban area even prior to his marriage meaning that his visits are few and far between. And despite the closeness of the brothers they may not see each other frequently. This troper is an adult female living in Manhattan a mere four blocks away from her adult brother. This troper sees her brother maybe thrice a year.



* A minor complaint: Future Ted always talks to his children about "Aunt Robin, Uncle Barney, Aunt Lily, and Uncle Marshal", yet they aren't his brothers and sisters and therefore, wouldn't be the childrens' aunt or uncles. Maybe it's different in some parts of the US but the only times I've heard people being referred to as an uncle or aunt is if they were really biological uncles or aunts.

to:

* A minor complaint: Future Ted always talks to his children about "Aunt Robin, Uncle Barney, Aunt Lily, and Uncle Marshal", Marshall", yet they aren't his brothers and sisters and therefore, wouldn't be the childrens' aunt or uncles. Maybe it's different in some parts of the US but the only times I've heard people being referred to as an uncle or aunt is if they were really biological uncles or aunts.



** Most New York apartments don't have level floors. This troper has lived in 3 different ones and only one of them had level floors. One had floors that were so un-level that by the end of a night of sleep the mattress would be falling off the bedframe and onto the floor in the direction of the slant. In NYC level floors are something that most residents don't think about. If it has four walls, is rodent free and doesn't cost so much that you can't eat then you often don't question something like unlevel floors until it is too late. It is actually almost more surprising that they'd spend the money to get it fixed.

to:

** Most New York apartments don't have level floors. This troper has lived in 3 different ones and only one of them had level floors. One had floors that were so un-level that by the end of a night of sleep the mattress would be falling off the bedframe and onto the floor in the direction of the slant. In NYC level floors are something that most residents don't think about. If it has four walls, is rodent free and doesn't cost so much that you can't eat then you often don't question something like unlevel floors until it is too late. It is actually almost more surprising that they'd spend the money to get it fixed.



** To be fair, the ''Perfect Week'' was one of the rare episodes in which someone else narrated. It was told form Barney's POV.

to:

** To be fair, the ''Perfect Week'' was one of the rare episodes in which someone else narrated. It was told form from Barney's POV.



**Bagpiping was used in place of a cruder word specifically, which wasn't the case in the other situatiins, similarly to when Barney chants "kiss him!" at the Wedding Bride screening. He's censoring the profanity, not the reference to sex. (Although that isn't consistent with the "tantric bagpiping" comment.)



*** Deffinitely multiple sessions. IIRC, the children complained at the beggining of season 2 that he had been telling the story for a year.

to:

*** Deffinitely Definitely multiple sessions. IIRC, the children complained at the beggining beginning of season 2 that he had been telling the story for a year.


Added DiffLines:


Added DiffLines:

* She did say she felt bad and wanted to apologize or the like. Personally I think they should have had a episode where she makes it up to him somehow, such as by going on Robin's show and [[ToiletHumor farting with thousands people watching her]].

Added DiffLines:

[[/folder]]

[[folder: Lily ruining Ted's relationships]]
* Is there any reason she didn't just, you know, ''talk to Ted'' about how the girl in question didn't seem like a good fit for him, other than "she's just [[BlueAndOrangeMorality batshit insane]]."

Added DiffLines:

** The real question becomes thus: how did Victoria get the locket?

Added DiffLines:

[[/folder]]
[[folder:Brad's Trick]]
* How is Brad not disbarred from his little trick in The Stamp Tramp? It's basic code of ethics that you *must* disclose who you're representing.
* Also, getting the "firm's strategy" isn't as debilitating as the episode made it seem. There are no real surprises allowed during a trial for evidence, and much of the legal argument would have already been made in prior motions and the Complaint.

Added DiffLines:

*** Actually the stench is brought up in passing once or twice in future seasons as well.

Added DiffLines:

** He also did have a steady and probably very well-paying job at GNB for several years. Also from everything we know about Barney, he's probably been helping the other members of the gang financially behind the scenes from time to time, possibly even anonymously.
[[/folder]]
[[folder: When James discovers Sam Gibbs is his father]]
* Why does everyone act like it's ludicrous for Sam to be Barney's biological father when Loretta is James' biological mother? In a vacuum, seeing a white man thinking a black man is his biological dad would seem ridiculous, but in this case, there's plenty of context. If a black man and a white woman can have a child together who, despite being biracial, passes for black (yes we know that Wayne Brady isn't half-white, but his character is), then why is it worthy of ridiculous to suggest that the same black man and the same white woman might have had another child who, despite being biracial, passes for white? After all, biracial people can have skin tones almost anywhere on the spectrum (compare Klay Thompson and Barack Obama, for example). And there are even families who have fraternal twins who look like they are completely unrelated to each other.

Added DiffLines:

** Stuart had already been a bitter man who resents his wife, so it's not that much of a stretch to find out he finally decided he'd be happier with affairs.

Added DiffLines:

[[/folder]]
[[folder:Marshall should be broke]]
* In short order Marshall: Discovered his wife's enormous credit card debt, bought an apartment in Manhattan (with a really high interest rate due to aforementioned credit card debt), discovered the warped floors that had to be replaced (already mentioned as really expensive to fix), then lost his job (with no severance pay). He has also mentioned student loans from Columbia Law School (specifically mentioned as expensive). The only help he's seen receiving is Ted selling a new car and giving him the money. Neither Marshall's nor Lily's family appear to have the kind of money needed to support their children. Even keeping in mind the fluid economics of living in the TV version of New York City, there is no way he didn't go bankrupt and be reduced to freeloading room and board at Ted's apartment (come to think of it, he was still on the lease at that point for that apartment too).

Showing 15 edit(s) of 1109

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report