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** The first scene has his cow-workers get some good digs at him
--> "You'd think with all the kamikazes they threw at us in World War 2 just one of them would hit him."

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** The first scene has his cow-workers co-workers get some good digs at him
him:
--> "You'd think with all the kamikazes they threw at us in World War 2 II just one of them would hit him."

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** The first scene has his cow-workers get some good digs at him
--> "You'd think with all the kamikazes they threw at us in World War 2 just one of them would hit him."


** In a similar vein, In "Midnight Sun", both main characters are surprised and startled when [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Li0u15qkQhw Rod Serling is doing his opening]]. The most funny part is that Rod is proceeding as usual without the women trying to say a word.

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** In a similar vein, In "Midnight in "The Midnight Sun", both main characters are surprised and startled when [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Li0u15qkQhw Rod Serling is doing his opening]]. The most funny funniest part is that Rod is proceeding as usual without the women trying to say a word.


** In a similar vein, In "MidNight Sun", both main characters are surprised and startled when [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Li0u15qkQhw Rod Serling is doing his opening]]. The most funny part is that Rod is proceeding as usual without the women trying to say a word.

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** In a similar vein, In "MidNight "Midnight Sun", both main characters are surprised and startled when [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Li0u15qkQhw Rod Serling is doing his opening]]. The most funny part is that Rod is proceeding as usual without the women trying to say a word.


* The last scene of "A World of His Own". [[spoiler: Rod Serling, usually an invisible narrator, is monologuing the outro, describing the story as "ridiculous nonsense" that could never really happen, when the main character (who is able to create fictional characters by describing them into a tape recorder and destroy them by burning the tape) gets upset at Rod, and puts a tape labelled "Rod Serling" onto the fire. Serling says "Well, that's the way it goes," and fades away.]] What makes this really funny is that [[spoiler:this was the first time on the series that Serling ever appeared on-screen in the show.]]

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* The last scene of "A World of His Own". [[spoiler: Rod Serling, usually an invisible narrator, is monologuing the outro, describing the story as "ridiculous nonsense" that could never really happen, when the main character (who is able to create fictional characters by describing them into a tape recorder and destroy them by burning the tape) gets upset at Rod, and puts a tape labelled "Rod Serling" onto the fire. Serling says "Well, that's the way it goes," and fades away.]] (seen [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXuQJ3Z-T4E here]]) What makes this really funny is that [[spoiler:this was the first time on the series that Serling ever appeared on-screen in the show.]]]]
** In a similar vein, In "MidNight Sun", both main characters are surprised and startled when [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Li0u15qkQhw Rod Serling is doing his opening]]. The most funny part is that Rod is proceeding as usual without the women trying to say a word.


* "Once Upon a Time" is set in 1890 and 1960. And the 1890 segments are done as silent films.

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* "Once Upon a Time" is set in 1890 and 1960.1962. And the 1890 segments are done as silent films.



** Interestingly, the 1960s scenes showcase the same kind of physical acting and pacing of the 1890 scenes... just without the vaudeville piano. The lack of music during this (such as when Buster Keaton keeps setting off vacuum cleaners) manages to make these scenes all the more funny, if only for [[CringeComedy the cringe factor]].
** Special mention goes to the ending: Mulligan tries to do his janitor job [[spoiler:as the professor bemoans living in 1890]]. Fed up ("This guy sounds worse than my mother-in-law."), Mulligan [[spoiler:places the time helmet onto his head and sends him back to 1960, and then resumes his sweeping]].

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** Interestingly, the 1960s 1962 scenes showcase the same kind of physical acting and pacing of the 1890 scenes... just without the vaudeville piano. The lack of music during this (such as when Buster Keaton keeps setting off vacuum cleaners) manages to make these scenes all the more funny, if only for [[CringeComedy the cringe factor]].
** Special mention goes to the ending: Mulligan tries to do his janitor job [[spoiler:as the professor bemoans living in 1890]]. Fed up ("This guy sounds worse than my mother-in-law."), Mulligan [[spoiler:places the time helmet onto his head and sends him back to 1960, 1962, and then resumes his sweeping]].



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* "The Mind & the Matter": After reading a book, main character Archibald Beechcroft concentrates hard enough to render himself the only person in New York City. After being thoroughly bored by being the only person in town, he then mentally changes the world to that it would be filled with people exactly like him, personality and all. Because he's a perpetual grouch, everyone he meets in his office building acts exactly like him. This scene is made even funnier since they're all played by the same actor, even a woman in the office elevator.


* In this YouTube rendition of "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R0ILwuayqM4 Of late I think of Cliffordville]]", Feathersmith tries to sell modern ideas to the folks of Cliffordville, but it's an inverse of FishOutOfWater, and HilarityEnsues.

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* In this YouTube Website/YouTube rendition of "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R0ILwuayqM4 Of late I think of Cliffordville]]", Feathersmith tries to sell modern ideas to the folks of Cliffordville, but it's an inverse of FishOutOfWater, and HilarityEnsues.

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** Depends on how nearsighted they are. BlindWithoutEm isn't as common as fiction would have it, but it's not nonexistent, either.

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* Around the midway point of “Escape Clause”, the newly-immortal Walter Bedecker jumps in front of an oncoming subway train. The next scene has him making an insurance settlement on the incident. As the insurance representative leaves, he runs into one of his ''own co-workers'', apparently there because Mr. Bedecker decided to jump in front of a bus on the ''very same day''. Not only is the moment funny in and of itself, but it’s the perfect moment to cement just how much of an irredeemable {{Jerkass}} Bedecker is; he gains immortality via a DealWithTheDevil, and the very first thing he decides to do with it is to milk it for all it’s worth.


** During the opening, when Ben is playing "Martian" with Jenny and the boys, there's something adorably ridiculous about how the boys imitate the sound of laser guns with "[[SayingTheSoundEffectsOutLoud Boin! Boin! Boin!]]"

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** During the opening, when Ben is playing "Martian" with Jenny and the boys, there's something adorably ridiculous about how the boys imitate the sound of laser guns with "[[SayingTheSoundEffectsOutLoud "[[SayingSoundEffectsOutLoud Boin! Boin! Boin!]]"



* In "Cavender is Coming", Carol Burnett's character is pretty funny and pretty clumsy.

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* In "Cavender is Coming", Coming":
**
Carol Burnett's character is pretty funny and pretty clumsy.


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** At the end of the episode, Cavender and his boss are watching her bowl. The boss asks if you're supposed to keep your fingers in the ball while it's rolling toward the pins.



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* "Mr. Dingle, The Strong" is one of the series' few outright comedy episodes, with the the tone set by the opening scene featuring a man being bullied suddenly being interrupted by the arrival of a purposefully-campy-looking two-headed alien (as Serling intones: "[[CaptainObvious And these two unseen gentlemen are visitors from outer space.]]"). One of their first exchanges of dialogue upon arriving:
-->'''Alien 1:''' You sure we're invisible?
-->'''Alien 2:''' Beyond any doubt.
-->'''Alien 1:''' I wish they were.



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* In "Cavender is Coming", Carol Burnett's character is pretty funny and pretty clumsy.
--> '''Agnes:''' What's the signal for "I'm sorry"?
* "Sounds and Silences" is chalk-full of such moments, mostly having to do with Roswell hearing even the tiniest sounds as huge, cacophonous noises!



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* "The Chaser" gives us a part early in the episode where ''many'' people are waiting in line for the phone booth Roger is hogging in order to phone Leila. At one point, a man who is desperate to make a phone call decides he'll have to buy his way up front. He pays each waiting patron $10, one in particular being a woman who giddily takes the money. When he tries to buy off the old woman second in line, she says in a deadpan "Why should 3rd place be the same as the 1st? Twenty dollars."
* "Miniature" has Charley happily watch the doll inside the museum dollhouse live out a lovely little life. ...Until he imagines her a boyfriend, which serves to make Charley so jealous, he presses his nose against the glass.


** During the opening, when Ben is playing "Martian" with Jenny and the boys, there's something adorably ridiculous about how the boys imitate the sound of laser guns with "[[SayingTheSoundEffectOutLoud Boin! Boin! Boin!]]"

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** During the opening, when Ben is playing "Martian" with Jenny and the boys, there's something adorably ridiculous about how the boys imitate the sound of laser guns with "[[SayingTheSoundEffectOutLoud "[[SayingTheSoundEffectsOutLoud Boin! Boin! Boin!]]"

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