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* ''White Wilderness'' (1958) -- Filmed in Canada, this feature tells the story of life in the Arctic tundra. This film is notorious for perpetuating the myth that lemmings commit mass suicide. (Academy Award Winner)

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* ''White Wilderness'' (1958) -- Filmed in Canada, this feature tells the story of life in the Arctic tundra. This film is notorious for perpetuating the myth that lemmings commit mass suicide.suicide, when in fact the film's crew purposely drove many to their deaths. (Academy Award Winner)


* SuicidalLemmings: ''White Wilderness'' is infamous for talking about the lemmings throwing themselves off cliffs during their migrations.

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* SuicidalLemmings: ''White Wilderness'' is infamous for talking about the actions of its film crew, who purposely drove lemmings throwing themselves off cliffs during to gain footage of their migrations.demise.

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* SuicidalLemmings: ''White Wilderness'' is infamous for talking about the lemmings throwing themselves off cliffs during their migrations.


* ''Natures's Half Acre'' (1951) -- The world of plants and insects through the sesons in an American meadow. (Academy Award Winner)

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* ''Natures's Half Acre'' ''Film/NaturesHalfAcre'' (1951) -- The world of plants and insects through the sesons in an American meadow. (Academy Award Winner)


* ''Beaver Valley'' (1950) -- Filmed in the forests of Minnesota, this film explores the life of the beaver. (Academy Award Winner)

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* ''Beaver Valley'' ''Film/InBeaverValley'' (1950) -- Filmed in the forests of Minnesota, this film explores the life of the beaver. (Academy Award Winner)


** ''Perri'' is one for ''Disney/{{Bambi}}'', being based on a book by the same author, thus acting as a sort of live-action sequel to it. There is even a guest appearance by the grown-up Bambi (or rather, a live stag identified as such).

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** ''Perri'' is one for ''Disney/{{Bambi}}'', ''WesternAnimation/{{Bambi}}'', being based on a book by the same author, thus acting as a sort of live-action sequel to it. There is even a guest appearance by the grown-up Bambi (or rather, a live stag identified as such).


* WidescreenShot: The last reel of ''Secrets of Life'' was filmed in [=CinemaScope=].

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* WidescreenShot: The last reel of ''Secrets of Life'' was filmed in [=CinemaScope=].[=CinemaScope=].
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* NarrativeDrivenNatureDocumentary: The UrExample. While presenting animals in natural situations and paying lip service to the ruthlessness of "Nature's way", it also wasn't above anthropomorphizing the creatures depicted, often reveling in lighter moments and adding wry commentary.

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* DarkestAfrica: The origins of the phrase "The Dark Continent" are discussed in ''The African Lion''. The opening narration explains that until Africa's interior was explored, ancient cartographers left it blank on their maps. The accompanying visual is of the continent painted black until a brush paints in the details.


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* TheSwarm: A swarm of locusts appears in ''The African Lion''. One shot shows the locusts obscuring the entire landscape.


* AllOfTheOtherReindeer: A scene from ''The Living Desert'' features the story of a skinny ground squirrel who is ostracized by his peers for being a runt until he wards off a poisonous lizard.

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* AllOfTheOtherReindeer: A scene from ''The Living Desert'' features the story of a skinny ground squirrel who is ostracized by his peers for being a runt until he wards off a poisonous lizard.



* PintSizedPowerhouse: ''The Living Desert'' gives us the tarantula hawk, a wasp that kills a tarantula with a poison sting and then moves a large rock (which, to a human, is like towing a 30-ton truck with your teeth) while digging a hole to bury its victim for her young to feast on.


* ''The Living Desert'' (1953) -- Filmed in the deserts of the American west, showing the environment, climate and wildlife of locations like Death Valley and Monument Valley. Notably, this was the first feature-length entry in the series, and was the first feature released by Disney's own distribution company, Buena Vista Distribution. (Academy Award Winner)

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* ''The Living Desert'' ''Film/TheLivingDesert'' (1953) -- Filmed in the deserts of the American west, showing the environment, climate and wildlife of locations like Death Valley and Monument Valley. Notably, this was the first feature-length entry in the series, and was the first feature released by Disney's own distribution company, Buena Vista Distribution. (Academy Award Winner)


'''True-Life Adventures''' were a series of [[NatureDocumentary nature documentaries]] produced by Creator/WaltDisney from 1948 to 1960. Originally starting out as a series of two-reel short subjects, they eventually blossomed into full-length features. In all, the series won eight [[UsefulNotes/AcademyAward Academy Awards]], and it helped popularize the nature documentary as an enjoyable form of entertainment.

!!!Films in the series:

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'''True-Life Adventures''' ''True-Life Adventures'' were a series of [[NatureDocumentary nature documentaries]] produced by Creator/WaltDisney from 1948 to 1960. Originally starting out as a series of two-reel short subjects, they eventually blossomed into full-length features. In all, the series won eight [[UsefulNotes/AcademyAward Academy Awards]], and it helped popularize the nature documentary as an enjoyable form of entertainment.

!!!Films !!Films in the series:


* DocumentaryOfLies: ''White Wilderness'' is infamous for perpetuating the myth of lemmings committing suicide by jumping into the sea in droves through a staged sequence where lemmings purchased by the filmmakers were put on a snow-covered turntable pushed into the Arctic Ocean. Granted, the narration didn't say they were committing mass suicide, but that they were migrating down a path and that they would even cross bodies of water to get to their migration spot, suffering from exhaustion and drowning if the body of water was too wide.
** It also said that the scene of a polar bear sliding down a mountain was actually filmed in a studio rather than candidly.


* AndYouThoughtItWouldFail: Initially, RKO Radio Pictures, who distributed Walt Disney's films at the time, refused to release ''Seal Island'', claiming that audiences wouldn't want to see it because he was best known for making cartoons. Walt managed to convince theaters in New York and Los Angeles to run it to help qualify it for the Academy Awards; it ended up winning the award that year, convincing RKO to give it a proper release.

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* AndYouThoughtItWouldFail: Initially, RKO Radio Pictures, who distributed Walt Disney's films at the time, refused to release ''Seal Island'', claiming that audiences wouldn't want to see it because he was best known for making cartoons. Walt managed to convince theaters in New York and Los Angeles to run it to help qualify it for the Academy Awards; it ended up winning the award that year, convincing RKO to give it a proper release.

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