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* ''VideoGame/RedDeadRevolver'' is quite different from its successors, the ''VideoGame/RedDeadRedemption'' games. For one thing, it's a linear ThirdPersonShooter instead of a WideOpenSandbox, though it does have an explorable hub level. It's story and tone are also a lot DenserAndWackier than the ''Redemption'' games.


* ''VideoGame/DragonBallZBudokai'' had a massive case of this, as it was the first Dragon Ball Z game since ''VideoGame/DragonBallGTFinalBout''. There was no actual flight mechanic, but characters could gently glide down when knocked airborne. Some characters would have transformations that wouldn't be seen in other games, like Krillin would have an "Unlock Potential" transformation and Piccolo had a "Fused with Kami" transformation. Many characters would have original alternate costumes that hadn't been seen in the actual series. One that would stick out through many games is that, despite having transformations, it was quite common to hear Imperfect Cell's voice even as Semi-Perfect and Perfect Cell. This goes the same for Goku and the Super Saiyan 4 transformation. This was due to the fact that, unlike the English version of the anime, Cell and Goku were voiced by the same actor/actress throughout all variations, thus the files couldn't be altered for the various actors playing their forms in English.

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* ''VideoGame/DragonBallZBudokai'' had a massive case of this, as it was the first Dragon Ball Z ''Franchise/DragonBall'' game since ''VideoGame/DragonBallGTFinalBout''. There was no actual flight mechanic, but characters could gently glide down when knocked airborne. Some characters would have transformations that wouldn't be seen in other games, like Krillin would have an "Unlock Potential" transformation and Piccolo had a "Fused with Kami" transformation. Many characters would have original alternate costumes that hadn't been seen in the actual series. One that would stick out through many games is that, despite having transformations, it was quite common to hear Imperfect Cell's voice even as Semi-Perfect and Perfect Cell. This goes the same for Goku and the [[Anime/DragonBallGT Super Saiyan 4 transformation.transformation]]. This was due to the fact that, unlike the English version of the anime, Cell and Goku were voiced by the same actor/actress throughout all variations, thus the files couldn't be altered for the various actors playing their forms in English.



** The first game used characters from other franchises as part of the boss and summon roster, and had music taken from other video games. Later installments not only near-exclusively use original or [[GuestFighter borrowed]] content, but actively try to scrub most mentions of copyrighted characters. (The second game's recap does not mention that the first game's final boss was a zombified [[Manga/{{Dragonball}} Goku,]] even though his death-explosion plays a role in the plot. Goku does however get a small nod in a tombstone in ''4''.) Especially as of the fourth game, when the creator started including paid DLC and thus the series was no longer completely non-profit, and had the game censor copyrighted names [[BleepDammit by replacing one letter with an asterisk.]]

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** The first game used characters from other franchises as part of the boss and summon roster, and had music taken from other video games. Later installments not only near-exclusively use original or [[GuestFighter borrowed]] content, but actively try to scrub most mentions of copyrighted characters. (The second game's recap does not mention that the first game's final boss was a zombified [[Manga/{{Dragonball}} [[Franchise/{{Dragonball}} Goku,]] even though his death-explosion plays a role in the plot. Goku does however get a small nod in a tombstone in ''4''.) Especially as of the fourth game, when the creator started including paid DLC and thus the series was no longer completely non-profit, and had the game censor copyrighted names [[BleepDammit by replacing one letter with an asterisk.]]

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* The original ''VideoGame/{{Pikmin}}'' game featured three Pikmin types: Red, Blue and Yellow. Red and Blue Pikmin work pretty much the same as they do throughout the series, but Yellow Pikmin function completely differently; they lacked their trademark electricity immunity (there were no electrical hazards in the first game), and their unique trait was being able to handle Bomb Rocks. When Bomb Rocks returned in the third game, they were able to be handled by any Pikmin type.


** The DS games have a fee for renaming your characters. The 3DS games remove this. (For reference, there are 3 DS games and 5 3DS games, not counting the ''Mystery Dungeon'' spinoffs.)

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** The DS games have a fee for renaming your characters. The 3DS games remove this. (For this (for reference, there are 3 DS games and 5 3DS games, not counting the ''Mystery Dungeon'' spinoffs.)spinoffs).



** The first two games don't have subclasses.



** The first two games don't have subclasses, nor any sort of LimitBreak mechanic.
** In the first game, the level cap is 70 with no way to raise it in the postgame (or ever). In the second game, it's possible to raise it by exploiting the Retire mechanic (though it's a very long process, as the level is only raised by one at a time), and all subsequent games (including the remake of the first game, ''Millennium Girl'') allow the player to raise the party characters' cap by defeating certain {{Bonus Boss}}es.



* The first ''VideoGame/ProfessorLayton'' game, ''[[VideoGame/ProfessorLaytonAndTheCuriousVillage The Curious Village]]'', is a bit different from other games. The characters aren't as zoomed in during dialogue exchanges, the red exclamation mark symbol appears when you do any examination instead of just appearing when you've activated a puzzle, and there's very little voice acting outside of the Anime cutscenes and the victory/failure quotes after puzzles. There was also no Memo function at this point (though a handful of puzzles did let you draw directly on them), meaning that any note-taking and calculating had to be done on a separate sheet of paper. Finally, the optional side puzzles are much simpler than they'd be in later games (one consists entirely of clicking parts to assemble a robot dog - there isn't even the challenge of figuring out where the parts go - while another is little more than a jigsaw puzzle).

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* The first ''VideoGame/ProfessorLayton'' game, ''[[VideoGame/ProfessorLaytonAndTheCuriousVillage The Curious Village]]'', is a bit different from other games. The characters aren't as zoomed in during dialogue exchanges, the red exclamation mark symbol appears when you do any examination instead of just appearing when you've activated a puzzle, and there's very little voice acting outside of the Anime cutscenes and the victory/failure quotes after puzzles. There was also no Memo function at this point (though a handful of puzzles did let you draw directly on them), meaning that any note-taking and calculating had to be done on a separate sheet of paper. Finally, Furthermore, the optional side puzzles are much simpler than they'd be in later games (one consists entirely of clicking parts to assemble a robot dog - there isn't even the challenge of figuring out where the parts go - while another is little more than a jigsaw puzzle).puzzle). Finally, in terms of characterization, Layton is unusually baffled at people's obsession with puzzles, when in later games (even those placed chronologically before this one) he's not only okay with it, he ''himself'' is a veritable puzzle chewer.


** The [[VideoGame/MetalGear1 first game]] for the [=MSX2=] and NES had no crawling, no radar, a transceiver that was completely room oriented and a simple straightforward plot. Guards could only see in straight lines and the stages were screen-based (think the original ''Zelda''), allowing the players to escape detection by moving to the next screen (at least in the NES version, which lacked the higher alert phase). It also featured a leveling system that increases your maximum health and carrying capacity for every five hostages you rescued (and demotes you if you killed one) and multiple cardkeys were needed to open different doors.
** Snake in the first game lacks [[IconicOutfit his bandana]], and the cover of the game portrays him as a thinly disguised [[Film/TheTerminator Kyle Reese]]. ''Metal Gear 2'' similarly traced its character artwork from various recogniseable actors. Snake is now a thinly disguised Mel Gibson from ''Film/LethalWeapon'', Big Boss is Creator/SeanConnery, and Roy Campbell is Richard Crenna from ''Film/FirstBlood''. ''Metal Gear Solid'' would finally give each of these characters unique designs, and the version of ''Metal Gear 2'' found in ''Metal Gear Solid 3: Subsistence'' features new character sprites that better reflect how those characters look in the remainder of the series.
** Although it was a non-canon sequel made by a different team, ''VideoGame/SnakesRevenge'' played like the first game, only with the addition of side-scrolling segments.

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** The [[VideoGame/MetalGear1 first game]] for the [=MSX2=] and NES had no crawling, no radar, a transceiver that was completely room oriented and a simple straightforward plot. Guards could only see in straight lines and the stages were screen-based (think the original ''Zelda''), allowing the players to escape detection by simply moving to the next screen (at least in the NES version, which lacked the higher alert phase). It also featured a leveling system that increases your maximum health and carrying capacity for every five hostages you rescued (and demotes you [[VideoGameCrueltyPunishment if you killed one) one]]) and multiple cardkeys were needed to open different doors.
** Snake in the first game lacks [[IconicOutfit his bandana]], and the cover of the game portrays him as a thinly disguised [[Film/TheTerminator Kyle Reese]]. ''Metal Gear 2'' similarly traced its character artwork from various recogniseable actors. actors; Snake is now a thinly disguised Mel Gibson from ''Film/LethalWeapon'', Big Boss is Creator/SeanConnery, and Roy Campbell is Richard Crenna from ''Film/FirstBlood''. ''Metal Gear Solid'' would finally give each of these characters unique designs, and the version of ''Metal Gear 2'' found in ''Metal ''VideoGame/{{Metal Gear Solid 3: 3|SnakeEater}}: Subsistence'' features new character sprites that better reflect how those characters look in the remainder of the series.
** Although it was a non-canon sequel made by a different team, ''VideoGame/SnakesRevenge'' played like the first game, only with the addition of side-scrolling segments.segments and a focus on knives that the canon Snake would [[DiscontinuityNod outright deny]] until ''Metal Gear Solid 3'' and ''[[VideoGame/MetalGearSolid4GunsOfThePatriots 4]]''.



** In the first ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'', Snake's maximum health and item/ammo capacity increases after every boss battle (a play mechanic carried over from the MSX games), he would regain some health after every boss battle by taking a puff from a cigarette (later games would eliminate this and just bring you back to full health without explanation when it felt the need), and there were two endings based on one specific choice halfway through (all the other games in the series only had single endings), with unlockables that were available for NewGamePlus based on which ending you got (other games make them rewards for a CollectionSidequest, for completing a PacifistRun, or for completing the game on high difficulties). Also, there were no tranquilizers, relative lack of sound-based stealth (only running over specific loud floors or tapping on a wall would garner a reaction), there was no way to aim a gun in first person view or perform a roll, and the plot, while still intricate, is not as [[KudzuPlot insane]] as later games.

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** In the first ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'', Snake's maximum health and item/ammo capacity increases after every boss battle (a play mechanic carried over from the MSX games), he would regain some health after every boss battle by taking a puff from a cigarette (later games would eliminate this and just bring you back to full health without explanation when it felt the need), and there were two endings based on one specific choice halfway through (all the other games in the series only had single endings), with unlockables that were available for NewGamePlus based on which ending you got (other games make them rewards for a CollectionSidequest, for completing a PacifistRun, or and/or just for completing the game on high difficulties). Also, there were no tranquilizers, relative lack of sound-based stealth (only running over specific loud floors or tapping on a wall would garner a reaction), there was no way to aim a gun in first person view or perform a roll, and the plot, while still intricate, is not as [[KudzuPlot nearly as insane]] as later games.



* The first game based on ''VideoGame/{{Dune}}'' is an obscure Adventure/Strategy game; [[VideoGame/DuneII its sequel]] is the TropeCodifier for the RealTimeStrategy genre.

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* The [[VideoGame/Dune1992 first game game]] based on ''VideoGame/{{Dune}}'' is an obscure Adventure/Strategy game; [[VideoGame/DuneII its sequel]] is the TropeCodifier for the RealTimeStrategy genre.genre. The major differences between them are because the games are actually completely unrelated to one another in every way bar publisher (Virgin Games) and the ''Franchise/{{Dune}}'' license; Creator/WestwoodStudios's game was numbered as a sequel simply because Cryo Interactive's one came out earlier in the same year.


** ''VideoGame/KirbysDreamLand2'' and ''[[VideoGame/KirbysDreamLand3 3]]'' add [[PowerUpMount ridable animal helpers]] for Kirby to use that have their own abilities (Rick can GoombaStomp and later climb walls, Coo can [[VideoGameFlight fly freely]], Kine can swim freely, Pitch can glide and fly, Nago can jump multiple times, and Chuchu can walk on ceilings). They also provide alternate uses for Kirby's Copy Abilities. They were largely rendered obsolete by Kirby being more versatile with the uses of his abilities (including being able to transform into stone carvings of them in ''64'', giving Kirby the trademark abilities of a few of them), and haven't made much more than cameos until their return in ''VideoGame/KirbyStarAllies''. A case of TropesAreNotGood, however, as many fans clamored for their return.

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** ''VideoGame/KirbysDreamLand2'' and ''[[VideoGame/KirbysDreamLand3 3]]'' add [[PowerUpMount ridable animal helpers]] for Kirby to use that have their own abilities (Rick can GoombaStomp and later climb walls, Coo can [[VideoGameFlight fly freely]], Kine can swim freely, Pitch can glide and fly, Nago can jump multiple times, and Chuchu can walk on ceilings). They also provide alternate uses for Kirby's Copy Abilities. They were largely rendered obsolete by Kirby being more versatile with the uses of his abilities (including being able to transform into stone carvings of them in ''64'', giving Kirby the trademark abilities of a few of them), and haven't made much more than cameos until their return in ''VideoGame/KirbyStarAllies''. A case of TropesAreNotGood, Administrivia/TropesAreNotGood, however, as many fans clamored for their return.

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** In terms of setting, the first game was happy to indulge in an exaggerated case of IWantMyJetpack when it came to levels set in the future. The game was released in 2000, but "[[{{Cyberpunk}} Cyberden]]" was set in 2005, and the golden age sci-fi inspired "Planet X" and "Spaceways" took place in 2020 and 2035 respectively. By ''[=TimeSplitters 2=]'', the "cyberpunk era" had been pushed back to 2019 (and unlike "Cyberden", featured no sign of killer robots), while "Return to Planet X" now takes place in 2280.


** The original ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaI'' lets you take keys between dungeons, which just feels completely un-''Zelda''-like, especially since most later games (presumably in response to it being possible in the first) remind you constantly that keys only work in the dungeon you find them in. Because of this, keys can also be bought from shopkeepers to cheat if the player is having trouble clearing a puzzle. There are no towns anywhere, so the only characters besides the main three (Link, Zelda and Ganon) are Old Men and Old Women found in caves. Your bow also uses rupees to make arrows, which is bizarre even without contrast to other Zeldas. The English in-game text also has [[SpellMyNameWithAnS notoriously erratic spelling]].

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** The original ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaI'' lets you take keys between dungeons, which just feels completely un-''Zelda''-like, especially since most later games (presumably in response to it being possible in the first) remind you constantly that keys only work in the dungeon you find them in. Because of this, keys can also be bought from shopkeepers to cheat if the player is having trouble clearing a puzzle. There are no towns anywhere, so the only characters besides the main three (Link, Zelda and Ganon) are Old Men and Old Women found in caves. Your bow also [[MoneyToBurn uses rupees to make arrows, arrows]], which is bizarre even without contrast to other Zeldas.''Zelda''s. The English in-game text also has [[SpellMyNameWithAnS notoriously erratic spelling]].


** The original ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaI'' lets you take keys between dungeons, which just feels completely un-''Zelda'' like, especially since most later games (presumably in response to it being possible in the first) remind you constantly that keys only work in the dungeon you find them in. Because of this, keys can also be bought from shopkeepers to cheat if the player was having trouble clearing a puzzle. There are no towns anywhere, so the only characters besides the main three (Link, Zelda and Ganon) are Old Men and Old Women found in caves. Your bow also uses rupees to make arrows, which is bizarre even without contrast to other Zeldas. The English in-game text also has [[SpellMyNameWithAnS notoriously erratic spelling]].

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** The original ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaI'' lets you take keys between dungeons, which just feels completely un-''Zelda'' like, un-''Zelda''-like, especially since most later games (presumably in response to it being possible in the first) remind you constantly that keys only work in the dungeon you find them in. Because of this, keys can also be bought from shopkeepers to cheat if the player was is having trouble clearing a puzzle. There are no towns anywhere, so the only characters besides the main three (Link, Zelda and Ganon) are Old Men and Old Women found in caves. Your bow also uses rupees to make arrows, which is bizarre even without contrast to other Zeldas. The English in-game text also has [[SpellMyNameWithAnS notoriously erratic spelling]].



** The first and [[VideoGame/ZeldaIITheAdventureOfLink second games]] also have you find whole heart containers outside of dungeons instead of Pieces of Heart. This mechanic was resurrected in the UsefulNotes/NintendoDS installments.

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** The first and [[VideoGame/ZeldaIITheAdventureOfLink second games]] second]] games also have you find whole heart containers outside of dungeons instead of Pieces of Heart. This mechanic was resurrected in the UsefulNotes/NintendoDS installments.



** ''VideoGame/ZeldaIITheAdventureOfLink'' remains the only mainline game not to include ''The Legend of Zelda'' in its English title, suggesting that early on the official name of the series could have just been ''Zelda'', with the names of individual games going by TheXOfY instead. As a curious side note, the first two [[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaCDiGames Zelda CD-i games]], ''Link: The Faces of Evil'' and ''Zelda: The Wand of Gamelon'', follow the naming convention set out by ''The Adventure of Link''.
** Up until ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaALinkBetweenWorlds A Link Between Worlds]]'', [[WideOpenSandbox the open endedness]] of the original game was nowhere to be seen. In fact, until the aforementioned [=3DS=] game, it was gradually reduced from ''[[VideoGame/ZeldaIITheAdventureOfLink The Adventure of Link]]'' onwards.
** This trope also applies in terms of aesthetics and plot. The Triforce for one originally had only two parts, with the Triforce of Courage and the appearance as flat, golden Sierpinski triangles not featured until ''Zelda II''; in fact, the artwork, the cartoon, and the CD-i games actually portrayed it as glowing, gem-like tetrahedrons. While the standard look for the Triforce was codified in ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaALinkToThePast'', it was portrayed as actually speaking to Link. Link and Zelda's hair were brown, the expanded Hyrule in ''VideoGame/ZeldaIITheAdventureOfLink'' (which had DeathMountain on the southern part of the OverworldNotToScale instead of the usual northern location and had eastern and western regions separated by water) is never heard of in any other game, and races that became iconic aspects of the series in later games (i.e. Gorons, friendly Zoras, the Sheikah) are completely absent in early games. And then, of course, the early games had zero hints to the eventual timeline issues that would develop in large part thanks to ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime Ocarina of Time]]'', which would not be settled until Nintendo ''finally'' released an official timeline on the game's 25th anniversary. Said timeline relegates the early games to a third timeline in which Ganon won in ''Ocarina of Time''; even the creators seem to argue that the early installments were weird.

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** ''VideoGame/ZeldaIITheAdventureOfLink'' remains the only mainline game not to include ''The Legend of Zelda'' in its English title, suggesting that in early on planning, the official name of the series could have just been ''Zelda'', with the names of individual games going by TheXOfY instead. As a curious side note, the first two [[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaCDiGames Zelda CD-i games]], ''Link: The Faces of Evil'' and ''Zelda: The Wand of Gamelon'', follow the naming convention set out by ''The Adventure of Link''.
** Up until ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaALinkBetweenWorlds A Link Between Worlds]]'', [[WideOpenSandbox the open endedness]] open-endedness]] of the original game was nowhere to be seen. In fact, until the aforementioned [=3DS=] game, it was gradually reduced from ''[[VideoGame/ZeldaIITheAdventureOfLink The Adventure of Link]]'' onwards.
onward.
** This trope also applies in terms of aesthetics and plot. The Triforce for one originally had only two parts, with the Triforce of Courage and the appearance as flat, golden Sierpinski triangles not featured until ''Zelda II''; in fact, the artwork, the cartoon, and the CD-i games actually portrayed it as glowing, gem-like tetrahedrons. While the standard look for the Triforce was codified in ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaALinkToThePast'', it was portrayed as actually speaking to Link. Link and Zelda's hair were brown, Zelda had brown hair, the expanded Hyrule in ''VideoGame/ZeldaIITheAdventureOfLink'' (which had DeathMountain on the southern part of the OverworldNotToScale instead of the usual northern location and had eastern and western regions separated by water) is never heard of in any other game, and races that became iconic aspects of the series in later games (i.e. Gorons, friendly Zoras, the Sheikah) are completely absent in early games. And then, of course, the early games had zero hints to the eventual timeline issues that would develop in large part thanks to ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime Ocarina of Time]]'', which would not be settled until Nintendo ''finally'' released an official timeline on the game's 25th anniversary. Said timeline relegates the early games to a third timeline in which Ganon won in ''Ocarina of Time''; even the creators seem to argue that the early installments were weird.



** Ganon's weakness in the first game and ''A Link to the Past'' was [[SilverBullet Silver Arrows]], which were replaced with [[LightEmUp Light Arrows]] from ''Ocarina of Time'' onwards. In the first game, that was also his only weakness, as the iconic Master Sword didn't exist yet. ''Ocarina of Time'' introduced the idea that the Master Sword must be used to deliver the final blow, an idea that has mostly stuck since.

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** Ganon's weakness in the first game and ''A Link to the Past'' was [[SilverBullet Silver Arrows]], which were replaced with [[LightEmUp Light Arrows]] from ''Ocarina of Time'' onwards.onward. In the first game, that was also his only weakness, as the iconic Master Sword didn't exist yet. ''Ocarina of Time'' introduced the idea that the Master Sword must be used to deliver the final blow, an idea that has mostly stuck since.



** Ratchet is also noticeably different as a character in the original game. In the first game he was characterized as a streetwise and teasingly sarcastic character out for a good romp who becomes arrogant and sour towards Clank for much of the game after Captain Qwark's betrayal (until he realizes the error of his ways and the two work together on common ground), while from the second game onwards he is far more mature, warm-hearted and selfless (well, except for that one time in ''[[VideoGame/RatchetAndClankFutureToolsOfDestruction Tools of Destruction]]''). Notably Ratchet also has strong desires to be a hero, an aspect added into the re-telling of the origin story in ''VideoGame/RatchetAndClank2016''.

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** Ratchet is also noticeably different as a character in the original game. In the first game he was characterized as a streetwise and teasingly sarcastic character out for a good romp who becomes arrogant and sour towards Clank for much of the game after Captain Qwark's betrayal (until he realizes the error of his ways and the two work together on common ground), while from the second game onwards onward he is far more mature, warm-hearted and selfless (well, except for that one time in ''[[VideoGame/RatchetAndClankFutureToolsOfDestruction Tools of Destruction]]''). Notably Ratchet also has strong desires to be a hero, an aspect added into the re-telling of the origin story in ''VideoGame/RatchetAndClank2016''.



** While subsequent games, from ''Melee'' onwards, are notable for detailed environments and characters, as well as epic orchestral music, the original has {{Floating Continent}}s in front of a simple background, many more [[SpritePolygonMix sprites for items, Pokémon, and some attacks]], darker, low-key original songs and was promoted with cartoony, comic book style illustrations of the characters.

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** While subsequent games, from ''Melee'' onwards, onward, are notable for detailed environments and characters, as well as epic orchestral music, the original has {{Floating Continent}}s in front of a simple background, many more [[SpritePolygonMix sprites for items, Pokémon, and some attacks]], darker, low-key original songs and was promoted with cartoony, comic book style illustrations of the characters.



** ''Melee'' was the only time the series experimented with the formula for beginning a Vs. match. It replaced the original's three-second countdown with the announcer saying "Ready..." and introduction-animations were dropped in favor of the characters being brought to life from trophies. ''Brawl'' brought both of those pre-match elements back, and every installment onwards continued the tradition.

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** ''Melee'' was the only time the series experimented with the formula for beginning a Vs. match. It replaced the original's three-second countdown with the announcer saying "Ready..." and introduction-animations were dropped in favor of the characters being brought to life from trophies. ''Brawl'' brought both of those pre-match elements back, and every installment onwards since has continued the tradition.



** Also in the first game, while there were boss rematches in the final stage, there was no dedicated BossRush mode separate from the main game like in ''Kirby's Adventure'' onwards.

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** Also in the first game, while there were boss rematches in the final stage, there was no dedicated BossRush mode separate from the main game like in ''Kirby's Adventure'' onwards.onward.



** Level creators who started with the second game or onwards may be given a shock when coming to the original game and seeing how crude certain level creation techniques are, due the absence of almost all of the familiar cursor and Logic tools that makes seemingly simple tasks more difficult to accomplish. Multi-stage bosses in particular are a much more complex nightmare to get working, especially without Microchips to help compress the logic down and save on Thermometer use. Common gadgets from later titles like the Grappling Hook are also absent; you only have the Jetpack, Scuba Gear and the Paintinator from the Metal Gear Solid DLC to play with.
** The crude aesthetic also applies to [=NPCs=]. It's quite jarring to go from fully voiced cutscene characters like Da Vinci and Newton to Magic Mouth contraptions that only appear at the start and end of a level, and are replete with obvious stickers, visible connectors and voices you couldn't even call [[VideoGame/TheSims Simlish]]!

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** Level creators who started with the second game or onwards onward may be given a shock when coming to the original game and seeing how crude certain level creation techniques are, due the absence of almost all of the familiar cursor and Logic tools that makes seemingly simple tasks more difficult to accomplish. Multi-stage bosses in particular are a much more complex nightmare to get working, especially without Microchips to help compress the logic down and save on Thermometer use. Common gadgets from later titles like the Grappling Hook are also absent; you only have the Jetpack, Scuba Gear and the Paintinator from the Metal ''Metal Gear Solid Solid'' DLC to play with.
** The crude aesthetic also applies to [=NPCs=]. It's quite jarring to go from fully voiced cutscene characters like Da da Vinci and Newton to Magic Mouth contraptions that only appear at the start and end of a level, and are replete with obvious stickers, visible connectors connectors, and voices you couldn't even call [[VideoGame/TheSims Simlish]]!



** The "Trinity" signs of the first ''Kingdom Hearts'' allow Sora, Donald, and Goofy ([[CharacterSelectForcing and only those three party members]]) to interact with the environment in some way to reveal a hidden treasure. The Trinity marks are absent from ''[[VideoGame/KingdomHeartsChainOfMemories Chain of Memories]]'' onwards.

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** The "Trinity" signs of the first ''Kingdom Hearts'' allow Sora, Donald, and Goofy ([[CharacterSelectForcing and only those three party members]]) to interact with the environment in some way to reveal a hidden treasure. The Trinity marks are absent from ''[[VideoGame/KingdomHeartsChainOfMemories Chain of Memories]]'' onwards.onward.



** In ''VideoGame/DragonAgeOrigins'', Sten and the other Qunari were all but human in appearance--very tall black men with white hair and purple eyes. ''VideoGame/DragonAgeII'' onwards gave them grey skin and horns, as well as their war paint (the ''vitaar''). Having the Qunari be horned was intended from the beginning, but was unfeasible due to game engine limitations. Qunari were programmed to use human armor and the helmets wouldn't work with the horns. This is evident when you note that ogres, Qunari darkspawn, are horned even in the first game.

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** In ''VideoGame/DragonAgeOrigins'', Sten and the other Qunari were all but human in appearance--very tall black men with white hair and purple eyes. ''VideoGame/DragonAgeII'' onwards onward gave them grey skin and horns, as well as their war paint (the ''vitaar''). Having the Qunari be horned was intended from the beginning, but was unfeasible due to game engine limitations. Qunari were programmed to use human armor and the helmets wouldn't work with the horns. This is evident when you note that ogres, Qunari darkspawn, are horned even in the first game.



** The attitude towards female warriors change in subtle but notable ways in the series, making ''Origins'' stand out a bit. A female Warden’s gender is constantly brought up as odd and unusual, with many expressing surprise and the occasional sexist remarks upon meeting them. This is dialed down in the second game and, by the time of ''Inquisition'', the player’s gender is almost completely unremarked upon in dialogue almost to the point of PurelyAestheticGender. Female warriors are also a lot less common in ''Origins'' compared to the rest of the series; female templars and female warriors as party members do not appear until ''Awakening''. ''Inquisition'' has a lot more - if not just as many - plot-important female warriors as men.
** Grey Wardens do not wear any particular uniform in ''Origins'', which they are never seen without in the sequels. This comes across as a bit strange in retrospect since nobody tries to recognice a warden by sight. People don't ask the player why they are not in uniform, nor can you wear one to prove your identity.

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** The attitude towards female warriors change in subtle but notable ways in the series, making ''Origins'' stand out a bit. A female Warden’s gender is constantly brought up as odd and unusual, with many expressing surprise and the occasional sexist remarks remark upon meeting them. them.[[note]]A brief explanation ''is'' offered which could justify at least some of the surprise - the player character is the first female Warden in the country in some two hundred years - but it's easy to miss.[[/note]] This is dialed down in the second game and, by the time of ''Inquisition'', the player’s gender is almost completely unremarked upon in dialogue almost to the point of PurelyAestheticGender. Female warriors are also a lot less common in ''Origins'' compared to the rest of the series; female templars and female warriors as party members do not appear until ''Awakening''. ''Inquisition'' has a lot more - if not just as many - plot-important female warriors as men.
** Grey Wardens do not wear any particular uniform in ''Origins'', which they are never seen without ''Origins'' (or ''Awakening''), while in the sequels. sequels they all wear blue and white checkered outfits with double-headed griffon emblems. This comes across as a bit strange in retrospect retrospect, since nobody tries to recognice recognize a warden Warden by sight. People don't ask the player why they are not in uniform, nor can you wear one to prove your identity.



** Secondly, the way new classes unlocked was very different. Since ''VideoGame/Disgaea2CursedMemories'', it's worked like this: unlocking the first tier of a class requires either having a certain combination of other classes at certain levels, then passing a bill in the Dark Assembly (humanoid-type classes) or defeating a monster of that type (monster-type classes). To unlock higher tiers of a given class, you had to have ''the previous tier'' of that class levelled up to a certain point. In Hour of Darkness, humanoid classes unlock immediately upon fulfilling the requisite class-and-level combinations, and you can unlock a higher tier by having ''any tier'' of that class levelled up to a certain point. And monster tiers didn't unlock on levelling at all–unlocking a higher level monster tier required defeating a monster of that specific tier.

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** Secondly, the way new classes unlocked was very different. Since ''VideoGame/Disgaea2CursedMemories'', it's worked like this: unlocking the first tier of a class requires either having a certain combination of other classes at certain levels, then passing a bill in the Dark Assembly (humanoid-type classes) or defeating a monster of that type (monster-type classes). To unlock higher tiers of a given class, you had to have ''the previous tier'' of that class levelled leveled up to a certain point. In Hour of Darkness, humanoid classes unlock immediately upon fulfilling the requisite class-and-level combinations, and you can unlock a higher tier by having ''any tier'' of that class levelled leveled up to a certain point. And monster tiers didn't unlock on levelling leveling at all–unlocking a higher level monster tier required defeating a monster of that specific tier.



** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsArena Arena]]'', the first game in the series, is almost unrecognizable as an ''Elder Scrolls'' game. It is a simple hack-and-slash DungeonCrawler filled with frenetic, almost constant combat. The side quests are extremely simple and only there to help you acquire gold and experience. There are also none of the series' staples like [[SidequestSidestory joinable factions]], [[OurGodsAreDifferent Daedric Princes]], and slower-paced RPG elements. Even the very land of Tamriel is extremely different than that it would be in later appearances, with tiny villages later appearing as major cities and major cities being dropped completely. [[TheGoodKing Emperor Uriel Septim VII]] speaks in really cheesy YeOldeButcheredEnglish that future appearances would drop.
** "The Arena" was regarded as a nickname for Tamriel, due to its violent reputation, but other games never refer to Tamriel as such[[note]]The Third Edition Pocket Guide to the Empire refers to ''Nirn'', the world, as the Arena, however.[[/note]].

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** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsArena Arena]]'', the first game in the series, is almost unrecognizable as an ''Elder Scrolls'' game. It is a simple hack-and-slash DungeonCrawler filled with frenetic, almost constant combat. The side quests are extremely simple and only there to help you acquire gold and experience. There are also none of the series' staples like [[SidequestSidestory joinable factions]], [[OurGodsAreDifferent Daedric Princes]], and slower-paced RPG elements. Even the very land of Tamriel is extremely different than that from what it would be in later appearances, with tiny villages later appearing as major cities and major cities being dropped completely. [[TheGoodKing Emperor Uriel Septim VII]] speaks in really cheesy YeOldeButcheredEnglish that future appearances would drop.
** "The Arena" was regarded as a nickname for Tamriel, due to its violent reputation, but other games never refer to Tamriel as such[[note]]The such.[[note]]However, ''The Third Edition Pocket Guide to the Empire Empire'' refers to ''Nirn'', the world, as the Arena, however.[[/note]].Arena.[[/note]]



** The mainline ''Shin Megami Tensei'' series itself has undergone several changes since it started out. The [[VideoGame/MegamiTensei first game]] in the series was an adaptation of Aya Nishitani's ''Literature/DigitalDevilStory'' novels, featuring none of the alignment choices or MultipleEndings that would be characteristic of the series later on. The connection with the ''Literature/DigitalDevilStory'' series was drastically toned down in [[VideoGame/MegamiTenseiII the sequel]], and the ContinuityReboot ''VideoGame/ShinMegamiTenseiI'' dropped the novel series' plotline entirely. Also, many earlier Megaten games had first-person dungeon crawling as a key mechanic. This has been phased out from ''VideoGame/ShinMegamiTenseiIIINocturne'' onwards, though you could enter a first-person view in NewGamePlus, and limitations with the DS saw the old style updated and temporarily revived with ''VideoGame/ShinMegamiTenseiStrangeJourney''.

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** The mainline ''Shin Megami Tensei'' series itself has undergone several changes since it started out. The [[VideoGame/MegamiTensei first game]] in the series was an adaptation of Aya Nishitani's ''Literature/DigitalDevilStory'' novels, featuring none of the alignment choices or MultipleEndings that would be characteristic of the series later on. The connection with the ''Literature/DigitalDevilStory'' series was drastically toned down in [[VideoGame/MegamiTenseiII the sequel]], and the ContinuityReboot ''VideoGame/ShinMegamiTenseiI'' dropped the novel series' plotline entirely. Also, many earlier Megaten games had first-person dungeon crawling as a key mechanic. This has been phased out from ''VideoGame/ShinMegamiTenseiIIINocturne'' onwards, onward, though you could enter a first-person view in NewGamePlus, and limitations with the DS saw the old style updated and temporarily revived with ''VideoGame/ShinMegamiTenseiStrangeJourney''.



* The first ''Franchise/DragonBall'' videogame for the NES, ''Dragon Ball: Shenlong no Nazo'', was neither a FightingGame nor a RPG CardBattleGame, like almost every subsequent game, but a poorly done action game with long overhead phases a la Zelda and short sideview platform phases and boss battles, with an extremely limited moveset. Justified in that it was based on the first series, less action-packed and more focused on exploration and adventure, but still...

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* The first ''Franchise/DragonBall'' videogame for the NES, ''Dragon Ball: Shenlong no Nazo'', was neither a FightingGame nor a RPG CardBattleGame, like almost every subsequent game, but a poorly done action game with long overhead phases a (a la Zelda ''Zelda'') and short sideview platform phases and boss battles, with an extremely limited moveset. Justified in that it was based on the first series, less action-packed and more focused on exploration and adventure, but still...



** As a whole the first few titles were considerably darker than what we're used to now, with the series getting increasingly LighterAndSofter from ''VideoGame/HarvestMoonMagicalMelody'' onwards.

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** As a whole the first few titles were considerably darker than what we're used to now, with the series getting increasingly LighterAndSofter from ''VideoGame/HarvestMoonMagicalMelody'' onwards.onward.



** Any fan who picks up [[VideoGame/HarvestMoon1 the SNES series]] on Virtual Console will be surely shocked by the difference from what they know. There's no rucksack, there are no hearts besides the names (instead being in a diary much like in ''VideoGame/HarvestMoonAWonderfulLife'''), there are no no character portraits, you can't befriend non-bachelorette villagers, there are no heart events, and there are no real Harvest Godesss interactions. The English translation was censored thus getting you drunk on "juice", when almost all games in the series feature alcohol heavily. There are references to other gods besides the Harvest Goddess as well. The game is [[SurpriseDifficulty surprisingly difficult]] as there is no clock, you cannot ship at night, you can't ship perishables, and the days go by quickly. You often have no time to woo women and get your work done in the same day. Luckily there is no proper day-night system so you can work all night.

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** Any fan who picks up [[VideoGame/HarvestMoon1 the SNES series]] on Virtual Console will be surely shocked by the difference from what they know. There's no rucksack, there are no hearts besides the names (instead being in a diary much like in ''VideoGame/HarvestMoonAWonderfulLife'''), there are no no character portraits, you can't befriend non-bachelorette villagers, there are no heart events, and there are no real Harvest Godesss interactions. The English translation was censored censored, thus getting you drunk on "juice", when almost all games in the series feature alcohol heavily. There are references to other gods besides the Harvest Goddess as well. The game is [[SurpriseDifficulty surprisingly difficult]] as there is no clock, you cannot ship at night, you can't ship perishables, and the days go by quickly. You often have no time to woo women and get your work done in the same day. Luckily there is no proper day-night system so you can work all night.



** The villagers were less interactive. For example, in the first games, you had a menu option to do favors for them, ''Wild World'' onwards, the villagers will automatically run to you if they want you to do a favor.

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** The villagers were less interactive. For example, in the first games, you had a menu option to do favors for them, ''Wild World'' onwards, onward, the villagers will automatically run to you if they want you to do a favor.



* The first two ''VideoGame/DarkTales'' adventures, particularly the first one, are very different from those which followed. The art style is different, and they're the only two games in the series which don't have voice acting. The first one is also the only installment in which the bonus chapter doesn't in some way continue or supplement the main game's story; it's a completely unrelated little challenge. It also follows the Poe story on which it's based (''Murders in the Rue Morgue'') more closely than any other installment.



** Character models did not have animation; they simply slided around without moving their limbs.

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** Character models did not have animation; they simply slided slid around without moving their limbs.



* The original ''Videogame/FiveNightsAtFreddys'' lacks the {{retraux}} minigames featured in every other game in the series, and is the only one where the threat of losing power is a constant gameplay element.[[labelnote:*]]While ''Videogame/FiveNightsAtFreddysSisterLocation'' brought it back, it was only for a hidden level and a separate game mode added later.[[/labelnote]] Also, [[BigBad Freddy]] has a higher level of importance over the other animatronics (undergoing VillainDecay in the sequels), and the backstory is much more well-hidden; what later games bring front and center are instead hard to find {{easter egg}}s that [[ExcusePlot the main narrative]] never brings up.

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* The original ''Videogame/FiveNightsAtFreddys'' lacks the {{retraux}} minigames featured in every other game in the series, and is the only one where the threat of losing power is a constant gameplay element.[[labelnote:*]]While ''Videogame/FiveNightsAtFreddysSisterLocation'' brought it back, it was only for a hidden level and a separate game mode added later.[[/labelnote]] Also, [[BigBad Freddy]] has a higher level of importance over the other animatronics (undergoing VillainDecay in the sequels), and the backstory is much more well-hidden; what later games bring front and center are instead hard to find {{easter {{Easter egg}}s that which [[ExcusePlot the main narrative]] never brings up.mentions.



* Both sibling series of the ''VideoGame/{{Forza}}'' franchise have noticeable differences between their first instalment and later ones:

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* Both sibling series of the ''VideoGame/{{Forza}}'' franchise have noticeable differences between their first instalment installment and later ones:



** [=DedSec=] did appear in the first game, but as a morally ambiguous third party faction with HeWhoFightsMonsters tendencies. Both ''[[VideoGame/WatchDogs2 2]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/WatchDogsLegion Legion]]'' not only have their protagonists work directly for [=DedSec=], but the group is also depicted in a far more positive light; less [[WellIntentionedExtremist Well Intentioned Extremists]] and more LaResistance.

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** [=DedSec=] did appear in the first game, but as a morally ambiguous third party faction with HeWhoFightsMonsters tendencies. Both ''[[VideoGame/WatchDogs2 2]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/WatchDogsLegion Legion]]'' not only have their protagonists work directly for [=DedSec=], but the group is also depicted in a far more positive light; less [[WellIntentionedExtremist Well {{Well Intentioned Extremists]] Extremist}}s and more LaResistance.



* ''VideoGame/HeroesOfMightAndMagic I'' lacked the series staple of hero skills -- levelling up ''only'' meant an increase of statistics, there were no choices to be made or specializations to take, that only came in with ''II'' -- instead, each type of hero had some advantage, like Sorceresses being better at sailing. It also lacked pretty much any story in the game itself -- the four campaigns were the ''same'' except for different starting towns and each lacking the map about attacking the lord you picked, the map descriptions were barebones and there was no new story in the maps, far from the voiced briefings and in-map events of ''II'' onward.

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* ''VideoGame/HeroesOfMightAndMagic I'' lacked the series staple of hero skills -- levelling leveling up ''only'' meant an increase of statistics, there were no choices to be made or specializations to take, that only came in with ''II'' -- instead, each type of hero had some advantage, like Sorceresses being better at sailing. It also lacked pretty much any story in the game itself -- the four campaigns were the ''same'' except for different starting towns and each lacking the map about attacking the lord you picked, the map descriptions were barebones bare bones and there was no new story in the maps, far from the voiced briefings and in-map events of ''II'' onward.



** Organs and bodies were rendered to look more realistic, rather than bright and colorful like in later installments. On the other side of the spectrum, character artwork was noticeably more shonen-esque, whereas ''Second Opinion'' onwards would go for a more realistic look provided by Masayuki Doi of ''Persona'' and ''Shin Megami Tensei'' fame.

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** Organs and bodies were rendered to look more realistic, rather than bright and colorful like in later installments. On the other side of the spectrum, character artwork was noticeably more shonen-esque, whereas ''Second Opinion'' onwards onward would go for a more realistic look provided by Masayuki Doi of ''Persona'' and ''Shin Megami Tensei'' fame.



** There were many gameplay mechanics that stand out. You had a "Miss Limit" of 20; if you miss enough times the operation will end in failure. Future games drop the Miss Limit, making losing vitals or the occasional NonStandardGameOver the only ways to fail an operation. Several ailments were also dealt with differently. Triti had to be cut out with the scalpel after removing its pins, while gauzes had to be massaged down after applying the gel. Most visible is that you have both the Hand and the Bandage as tools you can select at anytime; the former used for the aforementioned massaging as well as for CPR, while the bandage was used to close up patients. Due to their extremely limited uses, they were removed from the tool selection in future games, only becoming selectable when relevant.

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** There were many gameplay mechanics that stand out. You had a "Miss Limit" of 20; if you miss enough times the operation will end in failure. Future games drop the Miss Limit, making losing vitals or the occasional NonStandardGameOver the only ways to fail an operation. Several ailments were also dealt with differently. Triti had to be cut out with the scalpel after removing its pins, while gauzes gauze had to be massaged down after applying the gel. Most visible is that you have both the Hand and the Bandage as tools you can select at anytime; the former used for the aforementioned massaging as well as for CPR, while the bandage was used to close up patients. Due to their extremely limited uses, they were removed from the tool selection in future games, only becoming selectable when relevant.



[[/folder]]
----

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[[/folder]]
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[[/folder]]


** The characters of the series tended to change a fair bit from game-to-game, owing to how each game in the series has differing philosophies over how to handle their narrative. Harry Tipper for example went from being a CowboyCop in the first game to a [[TuxedoAndMartini James Bond parody]] in the other two. Sergeant Cortez (who wasn't even in the first game despite being the main character of the other two) similarly went from being a rather generic HollywoodActionHero in ''2'' to a dorky IdiotHero in ''Future Perfect''.

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** The characters of the series tended to change a fair bit from game-to-game, owing to how each game in the series has differing philosophies over how to handle their narrative. Harry Tipper for example went from being a CowboyCop in the first game to a [[TuxedoAndMartini James Bond parody]] in the other two. Sergeant Cortez (who wasn't even in the first game game, despite being the main character of the other two) similarly went from being a rather generic HollywoodActionHero in ''2'' to a dorky [[{{Adorkable}} dorky]] IdiotHero in ''Future Perfect''.



** For the class-specific updates, the new weapons given to the class in question were locked behind achievements, and gaining certain numbers of the achievements granted milestone achievements that would unlock one of the new weapons in a specific order. This is weird enough on its own simply because, save for the occasional holiday-themed hat, the system was abandoned entirely after each class got an update in this manner by July 2010,[[note]]and, in another instance of this trope, the classes started sharing updates later in this cycle, with "Sniper vs. Spy" and then the Demo-versus-Soldier "WAR!"; Engineer only had the last of these updates to himself simply because there were no other classes left in need of an update for him to share it with[[/note]] but the first such update for the Medic was particularly odd for two reasons: one, you originally had to get ''[[HundredPercentCompletion all]]'' of the new achievements to get all three of his new weapons; and two, in spite of the strict completion requirements, a lot of the achievements were designed under the mindset of what a medic, or other classes while under the effects of a medic's [=UberCharge=], could ''theoretically'' do in a game, [[AwesomeButImpractical when the stars were aligned just right and a sacrifice to the deity of your choice was made before you started the game]], rather than what the class was actually '''designed''' to be doing 99% of the time - a lot of them even encouraged the exact opposite mindset ''any Team Fortress'' player, much less a Medic, should have by requiring you to focus on personal goals over helping the team[[note]]killing 50 Scouts with the syringe gun, assisting another Medic in making three kills in one life, or [=UberCharging=] five people on your friends list instead of teammates who actually need it[[/note]] even to the point of sabotaging the team's efforts[[note]]scoring the highest on your team without killing any enemies, which invariably requires leaving better players to die so they don't outscore you by just killing enemies[[/note]] and cooperating with members of the opposing team[[note]]deploying an [=UberCharge=] within 8 seconds of an enemy medic deploying one[[/note]]. Also, while it was a Medic-themed update, it wasn't actually named in reference to anything about the Medic, like most later updates - officially it was the "Gold Rush Update". Every other class-specific update was named after the class(es) in question except for the "WAR!" update for the Demoman and Soldier, which was instead named in reference to its backstory of pitting the two classes against one another in its lead-up.

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** For the class-specific updates, the new weapons given to the class in question were locked behind achievements, and gaining certain numbers of the achievements granted milestone achievements that would unlock one of the new weapons in a specific order. This is weird enough on its own simply because, save for the occasional holiday-themed hat, the system was abandoned entirely after each class got an update in this manner by July 2010,[[note]]and, in another instance of this trope, the classes started sharing updates later in this cycle, with "Sniper vs. Spy" and then the Demo-versus-Soldier "WAR!"; Engineer only had the last of these updates to himself simply because there were no other classes left in need of an update for him to share it with[[/note]] 2010, but the first such update for the Medic was particularly odd for two reasons: one, you originally had to get ''[[HundredPercentCompletion all]]'' of the new achievements to get all three of his new weapons; and two, in spite of the strict completion requirements, a lot of the achievements were designed under the mindset of what a medic, or other classes while under the effects of a medic's [=UberCharge=], could ''theoretically'' do in a game, [[AwesomeButImpractical when the stars were aligned just right and a sacrifice to the deity of your choice was made before you started the game]], rather than what the class was actually '''designed''' to be doing 99% of the time - a lot of them even encouraged the exact opposite mindset ''any Team Fortress'' player, much less a Medic, should have by requiring you to focus on personal goals over helping the team[[note]]killing 50 Scouts with the syringe gun, assisting another Medic in making three kills in one life, or [=UberCharging=] five people on your friends list instead of teammates who actually need it[[/note]] even to the point of sabotaging the team's efforts[[note]]scoring the highest on your team without killing any enemies, which invariably requires leaving better players to die so they don't outscore you by just killing enemies[[/note]] and cooperating with members of the opposing team[[note]]deploying an [=UberCharge=] within 8 seconds of an enemy medic deploying one[[/note]]. Also, while it was a Medic-themed update, it wasn't actually named in reference to anything about the Medic, like most later updates - officially it was the "Gold Rush Update". Every other class-specific update was named after the class(es) in question except for the "WAR!" update for the Demoman and Soldier, which was instead named in reference to its backstory of pitting the two classes against one another in its lead-up.



** Some abilities that are vital to classes today weren't around for a while. The Pyro didn't have the projectile-reflecting, foe-pushing, and ally-extinguishing airblast, today seen as the most valuable ability of the Pyro, for close to a year. The Engineer couldn't carry buildings, which greatly limited his range and usefulness, until his update in July 2010.

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** Some abilities that are vital to classes today weren't around for a while. The Pyro didn't have the projectile-reflecting, foe-pushing, and ally-extinguishing airblast, today seen as the most valuable ability of the Pyro, for close to a year. The Engineer couldn't carry buildings, which greatly limited his range and usefulness, until his update in July 2010.2010, almost ''three'' years after release.



** OfficialFanSubmittedContent was originally submitted through an official site instead of Steam Workshop.

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** OfficialFanSubmittedContent was originally submitted through an official site instead of the Steam Workshop.



** ''VideoGame/HalfLifeOpposingForce'' was developed by Creator/GearboxSoftware without any strict oversight from Valve, and as a consequence features several oddities not present in the rest of the series. The most memorable of these is the existence of "[[GiantSpaceFleaFromNowhere Race X]]", an alien army of PlanetLooters unrelated to Xen that arrive in Black Mesa to take advantage of the chaos. Race X is never mentioned again outside ''Opposing Force''. Aside from that, ''Opposing Force'' is also the only game where the G-Man takes an active role in the player's journey (see below). Finally, the weapon selection includes a much larger range creative and unusual choices, including a Barnacle {{Grappling Hook|Pistol}}, the Spore Launcher (a CoolPet that you feed fruit, giving it a SuperSpit attack), and the Displacer Cannon (a TeleportGun that has the potential to give you a NonStandardGameOver). The original ''Half-Life'' had a few unique weapons as well, but not as many as ''Opposing Force'' does, and ''Half-Life 2'' almost exclusively sticks with your StandardFPSGuns with the exception of the Gravity Gun and Pheropods.

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** ''VideoGame/HalfLifeOpposingForce'' was developed by Creator/GearboxSoftware without any strict oversight from Valve, and as a consequence features several oddities not present in the rest of the series. The most memorable of these is the existence of "[[GiantSpaceFleaFromNowhere Race X]]", an alien army of PlanetLooters unrelated to Xen that arrive in Black Mesa to take advantage of the chaos. Race X is never mentioned again outside ''Opposing Force''. Aside from that, ''Opposing Force'' is also the only game where the G-Man takes an active role in the player's journey (see below). Finally, the weapon selection includes a much larger range of creative and unusual choices, including a Barnacle {{Grappling Hook|Pistol}}, the Spore Launcher (a CoolPet that you feed fruit, giving it a SuperSpit attack), and the Displacer Cannon (a TeleportGun that has the potential to give you a NonStandardGameOver). NonStandardGameOver), to say nothing of several more conventional options that act as almost-direct upgrades to existing weapons, such as the Desert Eagle (a slightly faster and higher-capacity Python), M40 ({{hitscan}} Crossbow with even better damage), and M249 ([=MP5=] [[MoreDakka with more bullets]]). The original ''Half-Life'' had a few unique weapons as well, but not as many as ''Opposing Force'' does, and ''Half-Life 2'' almost exclusively sticks with your StandardFPSGuns 2'', with the exception of the Gravity Gun and Pheropods.Pheropods, almost exclusively sticks with your StandardFPSGuns, not bringing back any of the ''Opposing Force''-exclusive weapons.



*** When he finally speaks to you at the end of the first game, the G-Man speaks fluid English, with the only oddity being his tendency to [[{{Sssssnaketalk}} draw out S sounds]] and a ''single'' instance of [[VaderBreath taking in a loud breath]]. Come ''Half-Life 2'', his more alien manner of speaking is introduced, with heavy AccentUponTheWrongSyllable, frequent Vader Breaths, and drawing out several consonants to give the impression that communicating by way of speech itself is a foreign concept to him, and glossed over to act like that was always how he talked.

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*** When he finally speaks to you at the end of the first game, the G-Man speaks fluid English, with the only oddity being his tendency to [[{{Sssssnaketalk}} draw out S sounds]] and a ''single'' instance of [[VaderBreath taking in a loud breath]].breath]] between sentences. Come ''Half-Life 2'', his more alien manner of speaking is introduced, with heavy AccentUponTheWrongSyllable, frequent Vader Breaths, and drawing out several consonants to give the impression that communicating by way of speech itself is a foreign concept to him, and glossed over to act like that was always how he talked.


** The first game is noticeably different compared to later games. There's no RegeneratingHealth; UniversalAmmunition is averted to the extreme, as even weapons that did take the same ammo in the same form in reality, like the Sten vs [=MP40=] or the normal and scoped versions of any given rifle, couldn't share ammo, [[TheEnemyWeaponsAreBetter forcing the use of German weapons for 95% of the game]]; enemies were slightly more sporadic in their use of grenades; the player can't [[GrenadeHotPotato toss enemy grenades back]], even though [[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard NPCs can]]; you can select the rate of fire between semi-auto and full-auto for several weapons; QuickMelee takes the form of bashing the enemy with your gun instead of pulling out a knife, and is noticeably weaker than melee in later games as a result (frequently requiring two or even three hits to kill a single enemy); your LimitedLoadout included a third slot dedicated to pistols, which was restricted to the M1911 for the American campaign and then the Luger for basically everybody else, and grenades in a fourth slot rather than bound to a quick-use key; your selection of weapons in multiplayer is dependent on your faction, thus unbalancing the American team because they had two semi-auto rifles to everybody else's none; no sprinting, going for a ''VideoGame/CounterStrike''-like system where your movement speed is entirely dependent on your currently-equipped weapon, which interestingly makes a character holding a pistol in this game ''faster'' than a sprinting character in ''[=CoD4=]''; and Captain Price looks and sounds different from his more famous ''Modern Warfare'' depiction (particularly, he's [[FakeNationality voiced by an American actor]]) and [[SacrificialLion dies unceremoniously]] partway through the game. Its expansion (another example in itself; none of the later games in the series have had singleplayer-only content added after release, nor has post-release content been distributed on its own in any manner except [[DownloadableContent digitally]]) added sprinting, which cannot be used for nearly as long as it can in later games and defaults to [[DamnYouMuscleMemory an entirely different key]], but is otherwise identical, differing mainly in rebalancing weapons by adding semi-auto rifles to the German and Russian inventories (without balancing them differently for singleplayer, thus making the campaign [[DifficultySpike much more difficult]]) and nerfing machine guns by eschewing pre-placed [=MG42s=] in favor of giving every side a portable machine gun that has to be set up where the player wants. Moreover is the game's use of of the ''VideoGame/{{Quake III|Arena}}'' engine with few major modifications, compared to later games using iterations of a game engine still derived from ''Quake III''[='=]s but noticeably different from it. ''Call of Duty: Finest Hour'' was much the same as the first game, but with no GameplayAllyImmortality and a reworked medkit system to accommodate this (you could carry large medkits around with you and HealThyself or an ally with them). It was also the only game with a female player character (Tanya Pavelovna, a Russian sniper) and the only one where a player character at least becomes an NPC who can talk, until the ''Black Ops'' games (females are playable in some [[VideoGame/CallOfDutyZombies Zombies]] maps and an optional mission in ''[[VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOpsII Black Ops II]]'', culminating in being able to play ''[[VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOpsIII Black Ops III]]'' as a female in its entirety, and the first ''Black Ops'' sold itself somewhat heavily on the fact that the player character speaks all the time, even in gameplay).

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** The first game is noticeably different compared to later games. There's no RegeneratingHealth; UniversalAmmunition is averted to the extreme, as even weapons that did take the same ammo in the same form in reality, like the Sten vs [=MP40=] sharing 9mm bullets from similar magazines, or the normal and scoped versions of any given rifle, couldn't share ammo, [[TheEnemyWeaponsAreBetter forcing the use of German weapons for 95% of the game]]; enemies were slightly more sporadic in their use of grenades; the player can't [[GrenadeHotPotato toss enemy grenades back]], even though [[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard NPCs can]]; you can select the rate of fire between semi-auto and full-auto for several weapons; QuickMelee takes the form of bashing the enemy with your gun instead of pulling out a knife, and is noticeably weaker than melee in later games as a result (frequently requiring two or even three hits to kill a single enemy); your LimitedLoadout included a third slot dedicated to pistols, which was restricted to the M1911 for the American campaign and then the Luger for basically everybody else, and grenades in a fourth slot rather than bound to a quick-use key; your selection of weapons in multiplayer is dependent on your faction, thus unbalancing the American team because they had two semi-auto rifles to everybody else's none; no sprinting, going for a ''VideoGame/CounterStrike''-like system where your movement speed is entirely dependent on your currently-equipped weapon, which interestingly makes a character holding a pistol in this game ''faster'' than a sprinting character in ''[=CoD4=]''; and Captain Price looks looking and sounds sounding different from his more famous ''Modern Warfare'' depiction (particularly, he's [[FakeNationality voiced by by]] an [[Creator/MichaelGoughVoiceActor American actor]]) and [[SacrificialLion dies dying unceremoniously]] partway through the game.game, only becoming a staple of the franchise because AnachronicOrder meant the second game could have him show up in missions that took place before the one he died in. Its expansion (another example in itself; none of the later games in the series have had singleplayer-only content added after release, nor has post-release content been distributed on its own in any manner except [[DownloadableContent digitally]]) added sprinting, which cannot be used for nearly as long as it can in later games and defaults to [[DamnYouMuscleMemory an entirely different key]], but is otherwise identical, differing mainly in rebalancing weapons by adding semi-auto rifles to the German and Russian inventories (without balancing them differently for singleplayer, thus making the campaign [[DifficultySpike much more difficult]]) and nerfing machine guns by eschewing pre-placed [=MG42s=] in favor of giving every side a portable machine gun that has to be set up where the player wants. Moreover is the game's use of of the ''VideoGame/{{Quake III|Arena}}'' engine with few major modifications, compared to later games using iterations of a game engine still derived from ''Quake III''[='=]s but noticeably different from it. ''Call of Duty: Finest Hour'' was much the same as the first game, but with no GameplayAllyImmortality and a reworked medkit system to accommodate this (you could carry large medkits around with you and HealThyself or an ally with them). It was also the only game with a female player character (Tanya Pavelovna, a Russian sniper) and the only one where a player character at least becomes an NPC who can talk, until the ''Black Ops'' games (females are playable in some [[VideoGame/CallOfDutyZombies Zombies]] maps and an optional mission in ''[[VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOpsII Black Ops II]]'', culminating in being able to play ''[[VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOpsIII Black Ops III]]'' as a female in its entirety, and the first ''Black Ops'' sold itself somewhat heavily on the fact that the player character speaks all the time, even in gameplay).



** ''Call of Duty 2'' is overall much closer to the now-more-familiar style of ''Call of Duty 4'', but there are still some oddities, the major one being that you ''still'' can't sprint. It also brings some game mechanics that are now standard to the series, such as grenades bound to quick-use keys and regenerating health, but it has some rather odd ideas on how it's supposed to work with that; in particular, the devs seemed to have trouble dealing with the fact that the player has theoretically infinite health, and decided to make the smoke grenades the Next Big Feature of the game by requiring you to use them every fifteen seconds to sneak past machine guns and tanks that will chew you up if you try to actually take them on.
** The first ''VideoGame/ModernWarfare'' is noticeably different from its later two installments. Most obviously, it was sold under the title ''Call of Duty [[NumberedSequels 4]]'', which was later [[ArtifactTitle mostly phased out]] due to [[ExecutiveMeddling the franchise's split between Treyarch and Infinity Ward]]. Its campaign switches between little more than [[{{Ruritania}} the Russian countryside]] and [[{{Qurac}} a hostile, unnamed Islamic country]] (the latter of which you stop playing in as little as a third of the way through the game), as opposed to the more varied setings of the series' later two installments; there was also only one set of missions in a recognizably-specific real-world location (and that one being set in the real-world GhostTown that is UsefulNotes/{{Chernobyl}}), as opposed to every other mission in the later games taking place in Washington, D.C. or Paris or Moscow. This, combined with the second and third installments' heavy use of RuleOfCool, is why some of the first installment's gritty realism feels lost in its sequels. It also featured "Arcade Mode" and unlockable campaign cheats for collecting the intelligence, which were nowhere to be found in later installments. The game's multiplayer experience is also heavily modified in its sequels. The first installment featured three fixed killstreaks, equippable night vision goggles, and an equipment/perk system that was heavily reworked in sequels. The first-tier perks were all for extra equipment such as an RPG, claymore mines or extra ammo, for instance, and you were forced to go without one if you attached a grenade launcher or underbarrel grip to your weapon. The system for attachments was also slightly different (a maximum of one attachment at a time for any weapon, with the only options available being two types of sights, a suppressor, a foregrip or a grenade launcher, and some weapon types were noticeably restricted in what was available like sniper rifles ''only'' getting the ACOG and foregrips being restricted to shotguns and machine guns), and the AK-47 was the first alternate assault rifle available upon unlocking the ability to create your own classes - the next two ''Modern Warfare'' games made it the final unlock (here that honor goes to the [[BlingBlingBang Golden Desert Eagle]]). The PC version also had some noticeable differences from the console versions - there was no Prestige system, it used [=PunkBuster=] as its anti-cheat system (making things difficult to set up properly when Even Balance eventually dropped official support for the game), and all of the post-release content console players had to purchase as DLC was made available for free in patches for the PC version, including a Christmas-themed variation of one map that the consoles never got except when [[HolidayMode it actually was Christmas]]. By ''Modern Warfare 2'' the publisher and developers realized the implications of selling the games over UsefulNotes/{{Steam}}, and were able to implement Prestiging, use Valve's anti-cheat system, and sell DLC map packs.

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** ''Call of Duty 2'' ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty2'' is overall much closer to the now-more-familiar style of ''Call of Duty 4'', but there are still some oddities, the major one being that you ''still'' can't sprint. It also brings some game mechanics that are now standard to the series, such as grenades bound to quick-use keys and regenerating health, but it has some rather odd ideas on how it's supposed to work with that; those; in particular, the devs seemed to have trouble dealing with the fact that the player has theoretically infinite health, and decided to make the smoke grenades the Next Big Feature of the game by requiring you to use them every fifteen seconds to sneak past machine guns and tanks that will chew you up if you try to actually take them on.
on. It would also be the last mainline game in the series to heavily avert BagOfSpilling and NoCutsceneInventoryInertia, allowing you to take enemy weapons and hang onto them for the entirety of a campaign even as the individual levels in it take place days and weeks apart from each other.
** The first ''VideoGame/ModernWarfare'' is noticeably different from its later two installments. Most obviously, it was sold under the title ''Call of Duty [[NumberedSequels 4]]'', which was later [[ArtifactTitle mostly phased out]] due to [[ExecutiveMeddling the franchise's split between Treyarch and Treyarch, Infinity Ward]].Ward, and later Sledgehammer]]. Its campaign switches between little more than [[{{Ruritania}} the Russian countryside]] and [[{{Qurac}} a hostile, unnamed Islamic country]] (the latter of which you stop playing in as little as a third of the way through the game), as opposed to the more varied setings of the series' later two installments; there was also only one set of missions in a recognizably-specific real-world location (and that one being set in the real-world GhostTown that is UsefulNotes/{{Chernobyl}}), as opposed to every other mission in the later games taking place in Washington, D.C. or Paris or Moscow. This, combined with the second and third installments' heavy use of RuleOfCool, is why some of the first installment's gritty realism feels lost in its sequels. It also featured "Arcade Mode" and unlockable campaign cheats for collecting the intelligence, which were nowhere to be found in later installments. The game's multiplayer experience is also heavily modified in its sequels. The first installment featured three fixed killstreaks, equippable night vision goggles, and an equipment/perk system that was heavily reworked in sequels. The first-tier perks were all for extra equipment such as an RPG, claymore mines or extra ammo, for instance, and you were forced to go without one if you attached a grenade launcher or underbarrel grip to your weapon. The system for attachments was also slightly different (a maximum of one attachment at a time for any weapon, with the only options available being two types of sights, a suppressor, a foregrip or a grenade launcher, and some weapon types were noticeably restricted in what was available like sniper rifles ''only'' getting the ACOG and foregrips being restricted to shotguns and machine guns), and the AK-47 was the first alternate assault rifle available upon unlocking the ability to create your own classes - the next two ''Modern Warfare'' games made it the final unlock (here that honor goes to the [[BlingBlingBang Golden Desert Eagle]]). The PC version also had some noticeable differences from the console versions - there was no Prestige system, it used [=PunkBuster=] as its anti-cheat system (making things difficult to set up properly when Even Balance eventually dropped official support for the game), and all of the post-release content console players had to purchase as DLC was made available for free in patches for the PC version, including a Christmas-themed variation of one map that the consoles never got except when [[HolidayMode it actually was Christmas]]. By ''Modern Warfare 2'' the publisher and developers realized the implications of selling the games over UsefulNotes/{{Steam}}, and were able to implement Prestiging, use Valve's anti-cheat system, and sell DLC map packs.



** The most obvious difference between earlier and later maps is that the early ones make much greater use of SurvivalHorror tropes. Look at the second map, "Verrükt", for example. That map plays its BedlamHouse setting completely straight, makes good use of OminousFog, contains plenty of tight corridors designed to limit the player's ability to simply outrun Zombies, and the map's central gimmick (your team is split up and can only reunite once the power is switched on) is designed to introduce a feeling of isolation. Each newer map marks a gradual but constant shift towards DenserAndWackier content and layouts designed to encourage movement over camping.

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** The most obvious difference between earlier and later maps is that the early ones make much greater use of SurvivalHorror tropes. Look at the second map, "Verrükt", for example. That map plays its BedlamHouse setting completely straight, makes good use of OminousFog, contains plenty of tight corridors designed to limit the player's ability to simply outrun Zombies, and the map's central gimmick (your team is split up and can only reunite once the power is switched on) is designed to introduce a feeling of isolation. Each newer map marks a gradual but constant shift towards DenserAndWackier content and layouts designed to encourage movement and completing objectives together over camping.camping and just shooting zombies.



** The characters of the series tended to change a fair bit from game-to-game, owing to how each game in the series has differing philosophies over how to handle their narrative. Harry Tipper for example went from being a CowboyCop in the first game to a [[TuxedoAndMartini James Bond parody]] in the other two. Sergeant Cortez (who wasn’t even in the first game despite being the main character of the other two) similarly went from being a rather generic HollywoodActionHero in ''2'' to a dorky IdiotHero in ''Future Perfect''.

to:

** The characters of the series tended to change a fair bit from game-to-game, owing to how each game in the series has differing philosophies over how to handle their narrative. Harry Tipper for example went from being a CowboyCop in the first game to a [[TuxedoAndMartini James Bond parody]] in the other two. Sergeant Cortez (who wasn’t wasn't even in the first game despite being the main character of the other two) similarly went from being a rather generic HollywoodActionHero in ''2'' to a dorky IdiotHero in ''Future Perfect''.



** For the class-specific updates, the new weapons given to the class in question were locked behind achievements, and gaining certain numbers of the achievements granted milestone achievements that would unlock one of the new weapons in a specific order. This is weird enough on its own simply because, save for the occasional holiday-themed hat, the system was abandoned entirely after each class got an update in this manner by July 2010 (whether on their own or shared with another class[[note]]which was itself sort of another oddity, as later in this cycle of updates, the classes started sharing updates, with "Sniper vs. Spy" and then the Demo-versus-Soldier "WAR!"; Engineer only had the last of these updates to himself simply because there were no other classes left in need of an update for him to share it with[[/note]]), but the first such update for the Medic was particularly odd for two reasons: one, you originally had to get ''[[HundredPercentCompletion all]]'' of the new achievements to get all three of his new weapons; and two, in spite of the strict completion requirements, a lot of the achievements were designed under the mindset of what a medic, or other classes while under the effects of a medic's [=UberCharge=], could ''theoretically'' do in a game, [[AwesomeButImpractical when the stars were aligned just right and a sacrifice to the deity of your choice was made before you started the game]], rather than what the class was actually '''designed''' to be doing 99% of the time - a lot of them even encouraged the exact opposite mindset ''any Team Fortress'' player, much less a Medic, should have by requiring you to focus on personal goals over helping the team[[note]]killing 50 Scouts with the syringe gun, assisting another Medic in making three kills in one life, or [=UberCharging=] five people on your friends list instead of teammates who actually need it[[/note]] even to the point of sabotaging the team's efforts[[note]]scoring the highest on your team without killing any enemies, which invariably requires leaving better players to die so they don't outscore you by just killing enemies[[/note]] and cooperating with members of the opposing team[[note]]deploying an [=UberCharge=] within 8 seconds of an enemy medic deploying one[[/note]]. Also, while it was a Medic-themed update, it wasn't actually named in reference to anything about the Medic, like most later updates - officially it was the "Gold Rush Update". Every other class-specific update was named after the class(es) in question except for the "WAR!" update for the Demoman and Soldier, which was instead named in reference to its backstory of pitting the two classes against one another in its lead-up.

to:

** For the class-specific updates, the new weapons given to the class in question were locked behind achievements, and gaining certain numbers of the achievements granted milestone achievements that would unlock one of the new weapons in a specific order. This is weird enough on its own simply because, save for the occasional holiday-themed hat, the system was abandoned entirely after each class got an update in this manner by July 2010 (whether on their own or shared with 2010,[[note]]and, in another class[[note]]which was itself sort instance of another oddity, as later in this cycle of updates, trope, the classes started sharing updates, updates later in this cycle, with "Sniper vs. Spy" and then the Demo-versus-Soldier "WAR!"; Engineer only had the last of these updates to himself simply because there were no other classes left in need of an update for him to share it with[[/note]]), with[[/note]] but the first such update for the Medic was particularly odd for two reasons: one, you originally had to get ''[[HundredPercentCompletion all]]'' of the new achievements to get all three of his new weapons; and two, in spite of the strict completion requirements, a lot of the achievements were designed under the mindset of what a medic, or other classes while under the effects of a medic's [=UberCharge=], could ''theoretically'' do in a game, [[AwesomeButImpractical when the stars were aligned just right and a sacrifice to the deity of your choice was made before you started the game]], rather than what the class was actually '''designed''' to be doing 99% of the time - a lot of them even encouraged the exact opposite mindset ''any Team Fortress'' player, much less a Medic, should have by requiring you to focus on personal goals over helping the team[[note]]killing 50 Scouts with the syringe gun, assisting another Medic in making three kills in one life, or [=UberCharging=] five people on your friends list instead of teammates who actually need it[[/note]] even to the point of sabotaging the team's efforts[[note]]scoring the highest on your team without killing any enemies, which invariably requires leaving better players to die so they don't outscore you by just killing enemies[[/note]] and cooperating with members of the opposing team[[note]]deploying an [=UberCharge=] within 8 seconds of an enemy medic deploying one[[/note]]. Also, while it was a Medic-themed update, it wasn't actually named in reference to anything about the Medic, like most later updates - officially it was the "Gold Rush Update". Every other class-specific update was named after the class(es) in question except for the "WAR!" update for the Demoman and Soldier, which was instead named in reference to its backstory of pitting the two classes against one another in its lead-up.


** The first game also featured a setting that was far more culturally vague, at least in the English version. While things like a SuperSentai show being extremely popular among children or the general outline of the court system point to the setting being based on Japan, they were small enough details that [[ThinlyVeiledDubCountryChange the localisation could reasonably change the setting to a slightly stranger version of the United States]]. Later games feature far more overtly unique Japanese themes, causing headaches for the localisers and leading to the infamous {{Americasia}} aesthetic.

to:

** The first game also featured a setting that was far more culturally vague, at least in the English version. While things like a SuperSentai {{Toku}} show being extremely popular among children or the general outline of the court system point to the setting being based on Japan, they were small enough details that [[ThinlyVeiledDubCountryChange the localisation could reasonably change the setting to a slightly stranger version of the United States]]. Later games feature far more overtly unique Japanese themes, causing headaches for the localisers and leading to the infamous {{Americasia}} aesthetic.

Added DiffLines:

** The first game also featured a setting that was far more culturally vague, at least in the English version. While things like a SuperSentai show being extremely popular among children or the general outline of the court system point to the setting being based on Japan, they were small enough details that [[ThinlyVeiledDubCountryChange the localisation could reasonably change the setting to a slightly stranger version of the United States]]. Later games feature far more overtly unique Japanese themes, causing headaches for the localisers and leading to the infamous {{Americasia}} aesthetic.


** ''VideoGame/HalfLife1'' lets the player [[VideoGameCrueltyPotential kill allied NPCs with little reprisal]], whereas ''VideoGame/HalfLife2'' makes all your allies FriendlyFireproof. WordOfGod states that this was due to different priorities between the two games. In ''1'', the developers wanted to give the player the freedom to do what they want in a world filled with BlackComedy, while in ''2'' they realised that it wouldn't make much sense for Gordon to become TheParagon of a bleak world if he could casually murder his friends.
** ''VideoGame/HalfLifeOpposingForce'' was developed by Creator/GearboxSoftware without any strict oversight from Valve, and as a consequence features several oddities not present in the rest of the series. The most memorable of these is the existence of "[[GiantSpaceFleaFromNowhere Race X]]" an alien army of PlanetLooters unrelated to Xen that arrive in Black Mesa to take advantage of the chaos. Race X is never mentioned again outside ''Opposing Force''. Aside from that, ''Opposing Force'' is also the only game where the G-Man takes an active role in the player's journey (see below). Finally, the weapon selection includes a much larger range creative and unusual choices, including a Barnacle [[GrapplingHookPistol Grappling Hook]], the Spore Launcher (a CoolPet that you feed fruit, giving it a SuperSpit attack), and the Displacer Cannon (a TeleportGun that has the potential to give you a NonStandardGameOver). The original ''Half-Life'' had a few unique weapons as well, but not as many as ''Opposing Force'' does, and ''Half-Life 2'' almost exclusively sticks with your StandardFPSGuns with the exception of the Gravity Gun and Pheropods.
** Comparing ''VideoGame/HalfLife1'' and [[VideoGame/HalfLife2 its sequel]] reveals a number of differences in how it treats the G-Man:

to:

** ''VideoGame/HalfLife1'' lets the player [[VideoGameCrueltyPotential kill allied NPCs with little reprisal]], whereas ''VideoGame/HalfLife2'' makes all your allies FriendlyFireproof. WordOfGod states that this was due to different priorities between the two games. In ''1'', the developers wanted to give the player the freedom to do what they want in a world filled with BlackComedy, while in ''2'' they realised that it wouldn't make much sense for Gordon to become TheParagon of a bleak world [[GameplayAndStorySegregation if he could casually murder his friends.
friends]].
** ''VideoGame/HalfLifeOpposingForce'' was developed by Creator/GearboxSoftware without any strict oversight from Valve, and as a consequence features several oddities not present in the rest of the series. The most memorable of these is the existence of "[[GiantSpaceFleaFromNowhere Race X]]" X]]", an alien army of PlanetLooters unrelated to Xen that arrive in Black Mesa to take advantage of the chaos. Race X is never mentioned again outside ''Opposing Force''. Aside from that, ''Opposing Force'' is also the only game where the G-Man takes an active role in the player's journey (see below). Finally, the weapon selection includes a much larger range creative and unusual choices, including a Barnacle [[GrapplingHookPistol Grappling Hook]], {{Grappling Hook|Pistol}}, the Spore Launcher (a CoolPet that you feed fruit, giving it a SuperSpit attack), and the Displacer Cannon (a TeleportGun that has the potential to give you a NonStandardGameOver). The original ''Half-Life'' had a few unique weapons as well, but not as many as ''Opposing Force'' does, and ''Half-Life 2'' almost exclusively sticks with your StandardFPSGuns with the exception of the Gravity Gun and Pheropods.
** Comparing ''VideoGame/HalfLife1'' ''Half-Life'' and [[VideoGame/HalfLife2 its sequel]] sequel reveals a number of differences in how it treats the G-Man:



*** ''Opposing Force'' portrays the G-Man as being far more involved in the player's journey; he opens a door to save Shephard from [[RiseToTheChallenge rising toxic waste]], locks another door to prevent him from escaping Black Mesa, [[spoiler:and rearms a nuclear bomb after Shephard defuses it]]. This stands in stark contrast to his far more passive role in both ''Half-Life'' and ''Half-Life 2'', where even if he is implied to be assisting Gordon, exactly how he does so is never directly shown and the most direct thing he does is having someone deliver a message.

to:

*** ''Opposing Force'' portrays the G-Man as being far more involved in the player's journey; he opens a door to save Shephard from [[RiseToTheChallenge rising toxic waste]], locks another door to prevent him from escaping Black Mesa, Mesa when the rest of the HECU begins pulling out, [[spoiler:and rearms a nuclear bomb after Shephard defuses it]]. This stands in stark contrast to his far more passive role in both ''Half-Life'' and ''Half-Life 2'', where even if he is implied to be assisting Gordon, exactly how he does so is never directly shown and the most direct thing he does is having someone deliver a message.



** The original game was divided into three episodes, with a fourth being added in the UpdatedRerelease ''Ultimate Doom''. The player [[BagOfSpilling cannot take weapons and powerups from one episode to the next]], making each episode's gameplay self-contained. This system is a relic of the game's {{Shareware}} origins; the first chapter, ''Knee-Deep in the Dead'', was available for free, and players had to mail-order the other two. Notably, this only actually gets directly explained in the transition to the second episode, where the protagonist [[TheHeroDies is ambushed at the end of the first episode and dies]], waking up in Hell. ''Doom II: Hell on Earth'' dropped this system as part of the shift to becoming a retail game from the start, with distinct "episodes" being an afterthought at best (mostly differentiated by what texture is currently being used for the sky).
** The Super Shotgun wasn't introduced until ''Doom II'', after which it would become the franchise's most iconic weapon second only to the BFG 9000. Several of the franchise's more iconic (or at least infamous) enemies were also not introduced until the second game, including the Chaingun Zombie, Arch-Vile, and Revenant.
** The console ports have some noticeable differences from the PC games in part because, rather than continuing to port the code from the then-most-recent version of the game to consoles, the ports are all derived from code for the UsefulNotes/AtariJaguar port, which was compiled from v1.2. This leaves several mechanics noticeably dated since none of the console ports of either game were released until two months after ''Doom II'', such as Lost Souls still counting towards the player's kill percentage (changed with the release of ''Doom II'' and the concurrent v1.666 for the first game to account for the Pain Elemental attacking by [[MookMaker spawning Lost Souls]]).

to:

** The original game was divided into three episodes, with a fourth being added in the UpdatedRerelease ''Ultimate Doom''. The player [[BagOfSpilling cannot take weapons and powerups from one episode to the next]], making each episode's gameplay self-contained. This system is a relic of the game's {{Shareware}} origins; the first chapter, ''Knee-Deep in the Dead'', was available for free, and players had to mail-order the other two.two, also leaving them to have to deal with that existing framework when they added a fourth for the retail release. Notably, this only actually gets directly explained in the transition to the second episode, where the protagonist [[TheHeroDies is ambushed at the end of the first episode and dies]], waking up in Hell. ''Doom II: Hell on Earth'' dropped this system as part of the shift to becoming a retail game from the start, with distinct "episodes" being an afterthought at best (mostly best, only really differentiated by what texture is currently being used for the sky).
text dumps between them.
** The Super Shotgun wasn't introduced until ''Doom II'', after which it would become the franchise's most iconic weapon weapon, second only to the BFG 9000.9000, and a staple of FPS arsenals even well ''after'' they [[FromClonesToGenre stopped straight-copying the game]]. Several of the franchise's more iconic (or at least infamous) enemies were also not introduced until the second game, including the Chaingun Zombie, Arch-Vile, and Revenant.
** The console ports have some noticeable differences from the PC games in part because, rather than continuing to port the code from the then-most-recent version of the game to consoles, the ports are almost all derived from code for the UsefulNotes/AtariJaguar port, which was compiled from v1.2. This leaves several mechanics noticeably dated since none of the console ports of either game were released until two months after ''Doom II'', such as Lost Souls still counting towards the player's kill percentage (changed with the release of ''Doom II'' and the concurrent v1.666 for the first game to account for the Pain Elemental attacking by [[MookMaker spawning Lost Souls]]).



* Most of the base game operators in ''VideoGame/RainbowSixSiege'' are TheFaceless or otherwise have their face heavily obscured, and their armor is almost identical among their special forces branch. This design philosophy feels a little odd compared to the operators added over the years, which feature far more varied and expressive designs. Another oddity is that the base game's [=CTUs=] like the SAS or [=GSG9=] have, technically, ''three'' Attackers and Defenders each (two unique Operators and a generic "Recruit"), whereas later [=CTUs=] like [=JTF2=] or the SAT get one Attacker and one Defender (though exceptions have come about, like "Operation Outbreak's" CRBN getting two Attackers with no Defenders, and vice versa for "Operation Para Bellum's" GIS). The base game's Operators also share more weapons between Attackers and Defenders than the post-release ones, such as all four SAS Operators being able to use the [=M590=] shotgun, while most later Operators focus on assault and marksman's rifles for Attackers, and shotguns and submachine guns for Defenders.

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* Most of the base game operators in ''VideoGame/RainbowSixSiege'' are TheFaceless or otherwise have their face heavily obscured, and their armor is almost identical among their special forces branch. This design philosophy feels a little odd compared to the operators added over the years, which feature far more varied and expressive designs. Another oddity is that the base game's [=CTUs=] like the SAS or [=GSG9=] have, technically, ''three'' Attackers and Defenders each (two unique Operators and a generic "Recruit"), whereas later [=CTUs=] like [=JTF2=] or the SAT get one Attacker and one Defender (though exceptions have come about, like "Operation Outbreak's" CRBN getting two Attackers with no Defenders, and vice versa for "Operation Para Bellum's" GIS). The base game's Operators also share more weapons have a slightly wider selection of weapons, including those shared between Attackers and Defenders roles, than the post-release ones, later Operators, such as all four SAS Operators being able getting to use the [=M590=] shotgun, while most later Operators focus on assault and marksman's rifles for Attackers, and post-release [=CTUs=] restrict shotguns to Defenders; or handgun choice being between a smaller, weaker but faster and submachine guns higher-capacity gun and a larger, stronger but lower-capacity one for Defenders.the base [=CTUs=] and, for the most part, a ''single'' pistol per post-release CTU.



* ''VideoGame/JakAndDaxter'': [[VideoGame/JakAndDaxterThePrecursorLegacy The first game]] is very different in [[DarkerAndEdgier tone]] from the later games in the series, although it was more in line with Naughty Dog's [own] ''VideoGame/CrashBandicoot'' titles. The second game replaces Eco with a {{BFG}}, the series becomes more Sandbox/''GTA'' orientated, and Jak becomes SuddenlyVoiced.

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* ''VideoGame/JakAndDaxter'': [[VideoGame/JakAndDaxterThePrecursorLegacy The first game]] is very different in [[DarkerAndEdgier tone]] from the later games in the series, although it was more in line with Naughty Dog's [own] Creator/NaughtyDog's earlier ''VideoGame/CrashBandicoot'' titles. The second game replaces Eco with a {{BFG}}, the series becomes more Sandbox/''GTA'' orientated, and Jak becomes is SuddenlyVoiced.


** Characters from ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' were quite prominent in ''VideoGame/KingdomHeartsI'' and ''VideoGame/KingdomHeartsII'', with the plot frequently requiring you to revisit the world they're hanging out in to interact with them, epecially in ''II''. Since then, the games have had maybe one FF character appear in a small role barely more prominent than a cameo until they eventually just [[ChuckCunninghamSyndrome stopped appearing altogether]], leaving the Hollow Bastion restoration, the ongoing conflict between [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII Cloud and Sephiroth]], and whatever happened to [[VideoGame/CrisisCoreFinalFantasyVII Zack]] to become [[AbortedArc Aborted Arcs]], with ''VideoGame/KingdomHeartsIII'' even breaking the series tradition of always having an FF character be involved in the story in [[Disney/Hercules]]'s world. This is especially jarring because the WeirdCrossover that is Final Fantasy plus Disney had been a big part of the franchise's identity and what brought many people to it in the first place. WordOfGod says that Final Fantasy characters being in the games at all was just a case of WolverinePublicity that is "no longer necessary". Fans who enjoyed the WeirdCrossover nature of the series and enjoyed seeing the FF characters and wanted a continuation or conclucion of their various subplots were not happy about this.

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** Characters from ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' were quite prominent in ''VideoGame/KingdomHeartsI'' and ''VideoGame/KingdomHeartsII'', with the plot frequently requiring you to revisit the world they're hanging out in to interact with them, epecially in ''II''. Since then, the games have had maybe one FF character appear in a small role barely more prominent than a cameo until they eventually just [[ChuckCunninghamSyndrome stopped appearing altogether]], leaving the Hollow Bastion restoration, the ongoing conflict between [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII Cloud and Sephiroth]], and whatever happened to [[VideoGame/CrisisCoreFinalFantasyVII Zack]] to become [[AbortedArc Aborted Arcs]], with ''VideoGame/KingdomHeartsIII'' even breaking the series tradition of always having an FF character be involved in the story in [[Disney/Hercules]]'s {{Disney/Hercules}}'s world. This is especially jarring because the WeirdCrossover that is Final Fantasy plus Disney had been a big part of the franchise's identity and what brought many people to it in the first place. WordOfGod says that Final Fantasy characters being in the games at all was just a case of WolverinePublicity that is "no longer necessary". Fans who enjoyed the WeirdCrossover nature of the series and enjoyed seeing the FF characters and wanted a continuation or conclucion of their various subplots were not happy about this.

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