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** This was also the only generation to have more than two fossil Pokemon introduced at a time. In every later generation they have always come strictly in pairs.


* Referring to all Pokémon as "it" is likely an [[TheArtifact artifact]] from Generation 1 lacking genders, though (in translations at least) [=NPCs=] did refer to their Pokémon by gendered pronouns even in the original games. Also, up until ''VideoGame/PokemonDiamondAndPearl'', Pokémon didn't have gender differences. All Pokémon had one design no matter their sex, with "shineness" being the only exterior distinction between Pokémon.

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* Referring to all Pokémon as "it" is likely an [[TheArtifact artifact]] from Generation 1 lacking genders, though (in translations at least) [=NPCs=] did refer to their Pokémon by gendered pronouns even in the original games. Also, up until ''VideoGame/PokemonDiamondAndPearl'', Pokémon didn't have gender differences. All Pokémon had one design no matter their sex, with "shineness" "shininess" being the only exterior distinction between Pokémon.


* The Kanto league has the unusual title of "Indigo League" because Kanto wasn't commonly referred as such until ''Gold and Silver''. All other leagues are named after their region (Hoenn League, Sinnoh League, etc).

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* The Kanto league has the unusual title of "Indigo League" because Kanto wasn't commonly referred as such until ''Gold and Silver''.Silver'', possibly because it is also the only league that serves two regions. All other leagues are named after their region (Hoenn League, Sinnoh League, etc).


* Originally, Pokémon that were considered Poison type in the video games were grouped under Grass type for the TCG; later sets would instead group them under Psychic. Also, before Dragon was its own type, Dragon-type Pokémon were considered Colorless, though they still frequently used the type's gimmick of relying on multiple Energy types to attack.
* When the Darkness and Metal Energy types were first introduced, they were only printed as Special Energy cards. Thus, a player could only have four of them in a deck, limiting the ability of players to use Pokémon that used those energy types. Later sets, starting with ''Diamond and Pearl'', would include basic energy versions of those types.

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* Originally, Pokémon that were considered Poison type in the video games were grouped under Grass type for the TCG; later sets beginning with the ''Diamond & Pearl'' set they would instead group them be grouped under Psychic. Also, before Dragon was its own type, Dragon-type Pokémon were considered Colorless, though they still frequently used the type's gimmick of relying on multiple Energy types to attack.
* When the Darkness and Metal Energy types were first introduced, they were only printed as Special Energy cards. Thus, a player could only have four of them in a deck, limiting the ability of players to use Pokémon that used those energy types. Later sets, starting with ''Diamond and & Pearl'', would include basic energy versions of those types.


** The limited number of Pokémon also created some type weirdness. In Gen I, Gastly, Haunter, and Gengar were the only Ghost-types and, for some reason, ''all'' of them were Ghost/Poison. Gen II added only one new Ghost-type, Misdreavus, the first pure-Ghost type; this caused some confusion since its weaknesses were different from what many assumed was normal for ghosts -- Gastly's family is only weak to Psychic and Ground because it's part-Poison. And then Gastly's family, plus Misdreavus and many other ghosts, got Levitate in Gen III, making them ''immune'' to Ground.

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** The limited number of Pokémon also created some type weirdness. In Gen I, Gastly, Haunter, and Gengar were the only Ghost-types and, for some reason, ''all'' of them were Ghost/Poison. Gen II added only one new Ghost-type, Misdreavus, the first pure-Ghost type; this caused some confusion since its weaknesses were different from what many assumed was normal for ghosts -- Gastly's family is only weak to Psychic and Ground because it's its part-Poison. And then Gastly's family, plus Misdreavus and many other ghosts, got Levitate in Gen III, making them ''immune'' to Ground.


** Held items in Generation II were saved in the area of a Pokémon's data that Generation I used to store catch rates, since a Pokémon's catch rate would never actually be used after it was caught in Generation I while Generation II, as well as later generations, use constant values for catch rates. This quirk had the following ramifications:

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** Held items Catch rates have always been constant and unchanging per species, but in Generation II were I, this data was saved in the area of a Pokémon's data that Generation I used to store catch rates, since a Pokémon's catch rate on individual mons anyway, even though it would never actually be used after it again once the mon was caught in caught. Generation I while Generation II, as well as later generations, use constant values for catch rates. This quirk had II repurposed this bit of the following ramifications:data to store held items in, resulting in some interesting quirks:

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* Downplayed. The Unown made more sense when the series still used real-world written languages. Since ''Black & White'', the games have [[RetCanon switched]] to the anime's usage of {{Wingdinglish}}. However, some some English text still remains (such as Team Rocket's symbol) which suggest that English text still exists in the ''Pokémon'' world, even if it's not as common as the made-up text.


** The first gym battle in the mangais Red vs Brock. Red wins by having his Plkachu use an electric-type move on Brock's Onix to one-hit KO it. This is despite Onix having a type-advantage over Pikachu. Future gym battles stick closer to the game's mechanics.

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** The first gym battle in the mangais manga is Red vs Brock. Red wins by having his Plkachu use an electric-type move on Brock's Onix to one-hit KO it. This is despite Onix having a type-advantage over Pikachu. Future gym battles stick closer to the game's mechanics.


** Crystal's original hair colour in coloured official artwork was brown. Later she was given blue hair like her game counterpart.
** The first gym battle in the anime is Red vs Brock. Red wins by having his Plkachu use an electric-type move on Brock's Onix to one-hit KO it. This is despite Onix having a type-advantage over Pikachu. Future gym battles stick closer to the game's mechanics.

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** Crystal's original hair colour color in coloured colored official artwork was brown. Later she was given blue hair like her game counterpart.
** The first gym battle in the anime is mangais Red vs Brock. Red wins by having his Plkachu use an electric-type move on Brock's Onix to one-hit KO it. This is despite Onix having a type-advantage over Pikachu. Future gym battles stick closer to the game's mechanics.


** CharacterizationMarchesOn is quite noticeable. Red's Pikachu was a {{Jerkass}} for all of ''one chapter'' before randomly mellowing down. Red himself was interested in girls (including Green and Misty) before becoming an ObliviousToLove (''willfully'' oblivious, at that!) ChasteHero. Blue's personality change is so noticeable that even Red lampshaded it. Blue started out as a snarky jerk, more on-par with his game counterpart, but a few chapters in he reappeared as TheStoic he is today.

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** CharacterizationMarchesOn is quite noticeable. Red's Pikachu was a {{Jerkass}} for all of ''one chapter'' before randomly mellowing down.down for the most part. Red himself was interested in girls (including Green and Misty) before becoming an ObliviousToLove (''willfully'' oblivious, at that!) ChasteHero. Blue's personality change is so noticeable that even Red lampshaded it. Blue started out as a snarky jerk, more on-par with his game counterpart, but a few chapters in he reappeared as TheStoic he is today.


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** The first gym battle in the anime is Red vs Brock. Red wins by having his Plkachu use an electric-type move on Brock's Onix to one-hit KO it. This is despite Onix having a type-advantage over Pikachu. Future gym battles stick closer to the game's mechanics.


* The human characters in Generation 1 are noticeably muted compared to future generations. Most [=NPCs=] have relatively realistic Japanese designs with hair colours in either brown, black, or colours that are stylized versions of those colours and their designs aren't that "out there"[[note]]With the wildest design being [[FieryRedHead Mis]][[WalkingSwimsuitScene ty]], who still falls in the "somewhat probable" range[[/note]]. It wasn't until ''Gold and Silver'' that the games fully embraced AnimeHair, YouGottaHaveBlueHair, and more flamboyant clothes.

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* The human characters in Generation 1 are noticeably muted compared to future generations. Most [=NPCs=] have relatively realistic Japanese designs with hair colours in either brown, black, or colours that are stylized versions of those colours and their designs aren't that "out there"[[note]]With the wildest design designs being [[FieryRedHead Mis]][[WalkingSwimsuitScene ty]], [[WalkingSwimsuitScene Misty]] [[FieryRedhead and]] [[BadassCape Lance]], who still falls fall in the "somewhat probable" "relatively believable, if a bit gaudy" range[[/note]]. It wasn't until ''Gold and Silver'' that the games fully embraced AnimeHair, YouGottaHaveBlueHair, and more flamboyant clothes.


* Pokémon lay eggs... except that one of the [[ApocalypticLog journal entries]] found in the Pokémon Mansion says "Mew gave birth. We named the newborn Mewtwo." This was unchanged in the remakes, which feature breeding. To be fair, this isn't the only way in which Mew isn't exactly your standard Pokémon.

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* Pokémon lay eggs... except that one of the [[ApocalypticLog journal entries]] found in the Pokémon Mansion says "Mew gave birth. We named the newborn Mewtwo." This was unchanged in the remakes, which feature breeding. To be fair, this isn't the only way in which Mew isn't Mew's not exactly your standard Pokémon.


* Pokémon lay eggs... except that one of the [[ApocalypticLog journal entries]] found in the Pokémon Mansion says "Mew gave birth. We named the newborn Mewtwo." This was unchanged in the remakes, which feature breeding. Granted, it isn't the only way in which Mew isn't exactly your standard Pokémon.

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* Pokémon lay eggs... except that one of the [[ApocalypticLog journal entries]] found in the Pokémon Mansion says "Mew gave birth. We named the newborn Mewtwo." This was unchanged in the remakes, which feature breeding. Granted, it To be fair, this isn't the only way in which Mew isn't exactly your standard Pokémon.


* Pokémon lay eggs... except that one of the [[ApocalypticLog journal entries]] found in the Pokémon Mansion says "Mew gave birth. We named the newborn Mewtwo." This was unchanged in the remakes, which feature breeding.

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* Pokémon lay eggs... except that one of the [[ApocalypticLog journal entries]] found in the Pokémon Mansion says "Mew gave birth. We named the newborn Mewtwo." This was unchanged in the remakes, which feature breeding. Granted, it isn't the only way in which Mew isn't exactly your standard Pokémon.


* Your [[TheRival rivals]] in the series often have the Trainer class that's simply Pokémon Trainer, which is the default class name used for important and storyline Trainers. However, your rivals in Gen I and Gen II actually had the Trainer class of Rival, and are also the only two who actively antagonize (or basically be a jerk to) the player. The two also stand out in other ways. Blue, the Rival of Gen I, is always trying to one up the player and is still the only Rival who ends up being the Champion until Trace in the Gen VII pseudo-remake. Meanwhile Silver, the Rival of Gen II, is a selfish thug who steals his Starter Pokémon, is completely abrasive towards others (at least at first), and is the only Rival with connections to a villainous team (being Giovanni's son and all). With the exception of [[VideoGame/PokemonBlack2AndWhite2 Hugh]], every Rival character introduced afterwards is a lot nicer and just ends up competing with the player in friendly competition and nothing more,[[note]]and even Hugh's standoffishness is due to being a KnightTemplar against Team Plasma,[[/note]] with a few of them even being childhood friends of the player.[[note]]While Blue was Red's childhood friend, the two had a falling-out sometime prior to the start of Generation I, though they seem to have repaired their relationship as adults by Generation VII.[[/note]]

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* Your [[TheRival rivals]] in the series often have the Trainer class that's simply Pokémon Trainer, which is the default class name used for important and storyline Trainers. However, your rivals in Gen I and Gen II actually had the Trainer class of Rival, and are also the only two who actively antagonize (or basically otherwise be a jerk to) the player. The two also stand out in other ways. Blue, the Rival of Gen I, is always trying to one up the player and is still the only Rival who ends up being the Champion until Trace in the Gen VII pseudo-remake. Meanwhile Silver, the Rival of Gen II, is a selfish thug who steals his Starter Pokémon, is completely abrasive towards others (at least at first), and is the only Rival with connections to a villainous team (being Giovanni's son and all). With the exception semi-exception of [[VideoGame/PokemonBlack2AndWhite2 Hugh]], whose hostility isn't even directed at the player, every Rival character introduced afterwards is a lot nicer and just ends up competing with the player in friendly competition and nothing more,[[note]]and even Hugh's standoffishness is due to being a KnightTemplar against Team Plasma,[[/note]] with a few of them even being childhood friends of the player.[[note]]While Blue was Red's childhood friend, the two had a falling-out sometime prior to the start of Generation I, though they seem to have repaired their relationship as adults by Generation VII.[[/note]]

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