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* PlayedWith in ''Film/TheHangover'': Stu Price's girlfriend Melissa is both emotionally and physically abusive to him, and has cheated on him at least once. It's PlayedForLaughs, at least [[BlackComedy dark ones]], and Stu spends a lot of the movie trying to justify the physical stuff ([[WhatMeasureIsANonBadass "That was only twice!"]]), going as far as to [[WhyDidYouMakeMeHitYou blame himself]], but after his wild weekend with his friends, who constantly remind him that she's no good for him, he [[spoiler:wises up and [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome breaks up with her at the wedding]].]]

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* PlayedWith in ''Film/TheHangover'': Stu Price's girlfriend Melissa is both emotionally and physically abusive to him, and has cheated on him at least once. It's PlayedForLaughs, at least [[BlackComedy dark ones]], and Stu spends a lot of the movie trying to justify the physical stuff ([[WhatMeasureIsANonBadass "That was only twice!"]]), going as far as to [[WhyDidYouMakeMeHitYou blame himself]], but after his wild weekend with his friends, who constantly remind him that she's no good for him, he [[spoiler:wises up and [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome [[SugarWiki/MomentOfAwesome breaks up with her at the wedding]].]]

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* ''Film/{{Overboard}}'' provides a meta example: The original 1987 film features a man abducting an amnesiac RichBitch who owes him money and tricks her into becoming his wife, causing her to eventually fall in love with him. You'd expect that a premise like this would never fly in 2018, but the film was actually remade, only with the genders flipped to make the protagonist's actions more forgivable.

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* In ''Film/PhantomThread'', make no mistake, Reynolds Woodcock is an asshole with ''serious'' ControlFreak issues. This does ''not'' make it right when [[spoiler:Alma deliberately feeds him poison mushrooms so he will be too weak to keep her from doing things as she wants.]] [[spoiler:The film ends with her deliberately poisoning him again, and him allowing this to happen, playing it as a form of sadomasochistic romance.]] Not '''one''' critic has ever complained about this; in fact, many feminists have denounced the film as "supporting toxic masculinity", or as glorifying male-on-female abusive relationships, because Alma never leaves Reynolds, completely ignoring [[spoiler:the poisoning thing]]. Try and imagine what the reception would be to a film where [[spoiler:a man poisoning a woman to keep her weak, vulnerable and forced to accede to his desires]] is treated as romantic.


** Taken UpToEleven in the sequel, ''Film/ThorRagnarok'', with a hefty dose of DoubleSubversion to boot. The main villain, Hela, easily kills an army of male warriors to show how much of a threat she is -- then later in the film does the same to [[AmazonBrigade the Valkyries]]. The scene in which the men are slaughtered is filmed the same way as any other action scene, but the scene with the Valkyries is shot in slo-mo, with heavy emphasis [[DeathIsDramatic on their invididual deaths]] -- it's clear it's meant to be a heart-wrenching scene. In other words, killing an army of men makes her a threat, but killing a (much smaller, and [[InformedAbility supposedly]] more elite) army of women makes her ''EEEEEVIL''. The film also features a [[spoiler: surviving Valkyrie]] who is EasilyForgiven, despite [[spoiler: deserting from her army, capturing goodness knows how many people for gladitorial combat, and torturing Thor]]. Just to twist the knife further, [[spoiler: the male members of the Warriors Three are killed with no fanfare whatsoever, but Lady Sif is still alive (although to be perfectly fair, her actress was unable to appear in the film)]].


** Taken UpToEleven in the sequel, ''Film/ThorRagnarok'', with a hefty dose of DoubleSubversion to boot. The main villain, Hela, easily kills an army of male warriors to show how much of a threat she is -- then later in the film does the same to [[AmazonBrigade the Valkyries]]. In other words, killing an army of men makes her a threat, but killing a (much smaller, and [[InformedAbility supposedly]] more elite) army of women makes her ''EEEEEVIL''. The film also features a [[spoiler: surviving Valkyrie]] who is EasilyForgiven, despite [[spoiler: deserting from her army, capturing goodness knows how many people for gladitorial combat, and torturing Thor]].

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** Taken UpToEleven in the sequel, ''Film/ThorRagnarok'', with a hefty dose of DoubleSubversion to boot. The main villain, Hela, easily kills an army of male warriors to show how much of a threat she is -- then later in the film does the same to [[AmazonBrigade the Valkyries]]. The scene in which the men are slaughtered is filmed the same way as any other action scene, but the scene with the Valkyries is shot in slo-mo, with heavy emphasis [[DeathIsDramatic on their invididual deaths]] -- it's clear it's meant to be a heart-wrenching scene. In other words, killing an army of men makes her a threat, but killing a (much smaller, and [[InformedAbility supposedly]] more elite) army of women makes her ''EEEEEVIL''. The film also features a [[spoiler: surviving Valkyrie]] who is EasilyForgiven, despite [[spoiler: deserting from her army, capturing goodness knows how many people for gladitorial combat, and torturing Thor]]. Just to twist the knife further, [[spoiler: the male members of the Warriors Three are killed with no fanfare whatsoever, but Lady Sif is still alive (although to be perfectly fair, her actress was unable to appear in the film)]].

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** Taken UpToEleven in the sequel, ''Film/ThorRagnarok'', with a hefty dose of DoubleSubversion to boot. The main villain, Hela, easily kills an army of male warriors to show how much of a threat she is -- then later in the film does the same to [[AmazonBrigade the Valkyries]]. In other words, killing an army of men makes her a threat, but killing a (much smaller, and [[InformedAbility supposedly]] more elite) army of women makes her ''EEEEEVIL''. The film also features a [[spoiler: surviving Valkyrie]] who is EasilyForgiven, despite [[spoiler: deserting from her army, capturing goodness knows how many people for gladitorial combat, and torturing Thor]].

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* ''Film/{{Blockers}}'' almost averts this, with a scene where Hunter confesses that, while he had cheated on his ex-wife, it was after she had cheated on him and beat him up in a restaurant. It was clearly humiliating for him, but then it's revealed the other characters in the scene weren't really paying attention and Hunter has to say NotListeningToMeAreYou.

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* In ''Film/GirlsTrip'', Dina gives Stewart an ArmorPiercingSlap because Stewart cheated on his wife, Ryan. While it's PlayedForLaughs due to how sleazy Stewart is and to sympathize with Ryan, nobody will laugh at a man for attacking a woman just because the woman cheated on her husband.


* In the original ''[[Film/TheParentTrap Parent Trap]]'', in a fit of anger at one point Maggie socks her ex-husband Mitch in the eye. His dialogue seems to imply she'd done stuff like that back when they were married: "Why do you have to get so physical? Can't even talk to you about anything, you're always trying to belt me with something." The movie tries to make the whole situation seem cutesy by the awkward and girly way in which she throws the punch, but for the [[ValuesDissonance modern viewer]] it casts an ominous tone over their eventual reconciliation.
** The remake acknowledges this in a conversation between Nick and Elizabeth, talking about one of their fights. Elizabeth asks "did I hurt you when I threw that...what was it?" and Nick coldly says "it was a hair dryer" which prompts a very guilty look from Elizabeth. Later on Meredith has thrown a ring at him and he says to Elizabeth in the same tone "at least it's smaller than a hair dryer".

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* In the original ''[[Film/TheParentTrap Parent Trap]]'', in a fit of anger at one point Maggie socks her ex-husband Mitch in the eye. His dialogue seems to imply she'd done stuff like that back when they were married: "Why do you have to get so physical? Can't even talk to you about anything, you're always trying to belt me with something." The movie tries to make the whole situation seem cutesy by the awkward and girly way in which she throws the punch, but for the [[ValuesDissonance modern viewer]] it casts an ominous tone over their eventual reconciliation.
**
reconciliation.[[note]] The remake acknowledges this in a conversation between Nick and Elizabeth, talking about one of their fights. Elizabeth asks "did I hurt you when I threw that...what was it?" and Nick coldly says "it was a hair dryer" which prompts a very guilty look from Elizabeth. Later on Meredith has thrown a ring at him and he says to Elizabeth in the same tone "at least it's smaller than a hair dryer".[[/note]]

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* There's a scene in ''Disney/TheRescuersDownUnder'' that has some domestic abuse played for laughs. A very large wife and a very small husband are eating dinner at a restaurant. The engagement ring Bernard was intending to give to Bianca rolls under their table, and Bernard, getting it, brushes up against the wife's leg. Assuming her husband is trying to play footsie (she never sees Bernard), she rather brutally smacks him, whereupon he cringes away from her in fear.


%%* {{Stepbrothers}}. Alice.

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%%* {{Stepbrothers}}.Film/StepBrothers. Alice.


* ''WesternAnimation/ChickenRun'': '''Averted'''. Mrs. Tweedy's treatment of her husband, while still comical, is clearly treated as terrible, dismissing and insulting him, and literally kicking his butt. Ginger does bitch-slap Rocky for deserting her and the other chickens at the end. Whether or not he deserved it is up to the viewer to decide.
* ''Disney/MeetTheRobinsons'': Aunt Petunia is introduced smacking around [[HenpeckedHusband her husband Fritz around]] in a cartoonish way. Of corse, it's worth mentioning that Petunia is [[CompanionCube a hand puppet that Fritz controls]], meaning he's clearly [[CloudCuckoolander off his rocker]].
* ''WesternAnimation/{{Rio 2}}'': Jewel's more or less emotionally abusing her husband Blu for the entire film, making all of his decisions for him, allowing her stern father to berate him and showing a blatant disregard for his difficulty transitioning to jungle life. But because Blu is supposed to be a [[NervousWreck sheltered worry-wart]], all of his opinions are treated as hilarious inept. If the genders were flipped, there'd be an uproar.
* ''Disney/{{Tangled}}'': Rapunzel's unnecessary and played-for-laughs physical violence against Flynn when they first meet. It's justified that she initially knocks him unconscious (twice), since he is an intruder. But then once he is unconscious, instead of physically restraining him by tying him up, she goes to put his unconscious body in her closet, which takes several attempts during which he endures a lot of physical abuse (all played for laughs). Then she ties him up to a chair (which she could have done to begin with, making the closet scene and abuse unnecessary). She knocks him unconscious for a ''third'' time while he is tied down (again unnecessary and he was physically restrained this time). When she accidentally lets the chair he is tied up to fall down so he falls on his face on the floor, she doesn't say "Sorry" but a dismissive "Oops". Later, when Flynn tries to argue with her to abandon their mission, instead of reasoning with him she answers with "''I will use this''" holding up the pan that she had knocked him unconscious with three times, menacingly to his face (imagine if it was a man that says to a woman "I will knock you out" to make her do his will during a dispute).
* ''Disney/WreckItRalph'': Played with--Sgt. Calhoun [[GetAHoldOfYourselfMan slaps Felix to stop him from freaking]] out when the two are stuck in [[QuicksandSucks NesquikSand]], causing the sentient vines of Laffy Taffy to giggle and slowly make their way down towards them. Despite her reluctance to do so, Felix, who can instantly heal himself with his magic hammer, demands Calhoun [[AmusingInjuries continue injuring him]] until the vines are close enough for them to pull themselves out. Out of context, it's easy to imagine a gender-swapped version being rejected en mass, but the context in which all of this happens is so... [[ItMakesSenseInContext let's just say "specific"]] that it'd take a lot of second-thinking to come off as this.

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* ''WesternAnimation/ChickenRun'': '''Averted'''.''WesternAnimation/ChickenRun'' averts it. Mrs. Tweedy's treatment of her husband, while still comical, is clearly treated as terrible, dismissing and insulting him, him and literally kicking his butt. Ginger does bitch-slap Rocky for deserting her and the other chickens at the end. Whether or not he deserved it is up to the viewer to decide.
* ''Disney/MeetTheRobinsons'': In ''Disney/MeetTheRobinsons'', Aunt Petunia is introduced smacking around [[HenpeckedHusband her husband Fritz around]] in a cartoonish way. Of corse, it's worth mentioning that Petunia is [[CompanionCube a hand puppet that Fritz controls]], meaning he's clearly [[CloudCuckoolander off his rocker]].
* ''WesternAnimation/{{Rio 2}}'': Jewel's 2}}'' has Jewel more or less emotionally abusing her husband Blu for the entire film, making all of his decisions for him, allowing her stern father to berate him and showing a blatant disregard for his difficulty transitioning to jungle life. But because Blu is supposed to be a [[NervousWreck sheltered worry-wart]], all of his opinions are treated as hilarious inept. If the genders were flipped, there'd be an uproar.
* ''Disney/{{Tangled}}'': ''Disney/{{Tangled}}'' and Rapunzel's unnecessary and unnecessary, played-for-laughs physical violence against Flynn when they first meet. It's justified that she initially knocks him unconscious (twice), since he is an intruder. But then once he is unconscious, instead of physically restraining him by tying him up, she goes to put his unconscious body in her closet, which takes several attempts during which he endures a lot of physical abuse (all played for laughs). Then she ties him up to a chair (which she could have done to begin with, making the closet scene and abuse unnecessary). She knocks him unconscious for a ''third'' time while he is tied down (again unnecessary and he was physically restrained this time). When she accidentally lets the chair he is tied up to fall down so he falls on his face on the floor, she doesn't say "Sorry" but a dismissive "Oops". Later, when Flynn tries to argue with her to abandon their mission, instead of reasoning with him she answers with "''I will use this''" holding up the pan that she had knocked him unconscious with three times, menacingly to his face (imagine if it was a man that says to a woman "I will knock you out" to make her do his will during a dispute).
* ''Disney/WreckItRalph'': Played with--Sgt.''Disney/WreckItRalph'' plays with this--Sgt. Calhoun [[GetAHoldOfYourselfMan slaps Felix to stop him from freaking]] out when the two are stuck in [[QuicksandSucks NesquikSand]], causing the sentient vines of Laffy Taffy to giggle and slowly make their way down towards them. Despite her reluctance to do so, Felix, who can instantly heal himself with his magic hammer, demands Calhoun [[AmusingInjuries continue injuring him]] until the vines are close enough for them to pull themselves out. Out of context, it's easy to imagine a gender-swapped version being rejected en mass, but the context in which all of this happens is so... [[ItMakesSenseInContext let's just say "specific"]] that it'd take a lot of second-thinking to come off as this.
abuse.


* ''WesternAnimation/ChickenRun'': Played straight in a brief scene near the end when Ginger angrily slaps Rocky. Otherwise, '''averted'''. Mrs. Tweedy's treatment of her husband, while still comical, is clearly treated as terrible, dismissing and insulting him, and literally kicking his butt.

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* ''WesternAnimation/ChickenRun'': Played straight in a brief scene near the end when Ginger angrily slaps Rocky. Otherwise, '''averted'''.''WesternAnimation/ChickenRun'': '''Averted'''. Mrs. Tweedy's treatment of her husband, while still comical, is clearly treated as terrible, dismissing and insulting him, and literally kicking his butt. Ginger does bitch-slap Rocky for deserting her and the other chickens at the end. Whether or not he deserved it is up to the viewer to decide.


* ''Disney/{{Tangled}}'': Rapunzel's unnecessary and played-for-laughs physical violence against Flynn when they first meet. It's justified that she initially knocks him unconscious (twice), since he is an intruder. But then once he is unconscious, instead of physically restraining him by tying him up, she goes to put his unconscious body in her closet, which takes several attempts during which he endures a lot of physical abuse (all played for laughs). Then she ties him up to a chair (which she could have done to begin with, making the closet scene and abuse unnecessary). She knocks him unconscious for a ''third'' time while he is tied down (again unnecessary and he was physically restrained this time). When she accidentally lets the chair he is tied up to fall down so he falls on his face on the floor, she doesn't say "Sorry" but a dismissive "Oops". Later, when Flynn tries to argue with her to abandon their mission, instead of reasoning with him she answers with "''I will use this''" holding up the pan that she had knocked him unconsicous with three times, menacingly to his face (imagine if it was a man that says to a woman "I will knock you out" to make her do his will during a dispute).

to:

* ''Disney/{{Tangled}}'': Rapunzel's unnecessary and played-for-laughs physical violence against Flynn when they first meet. It's justified that she initially knocks him unconscious (twice), since he is an intruder. But then once he is unconscious, instead of physically restraining him by tying him up, she goes to put his unconscious body in her closet, which takes several attempts during which he endures a lot of physical abuse (all played for laughs). Then she ties him up to a chair (which she could have done to begin with, making the closet scene and abuse unnecessary). She knocks him unconscious for a ''third'' time while he is tied down (again unnecessary and he was physically restrained this time). When she accidentally lets the chair he is tied up to fall down so he falls on his face on the floor, she doesn't say "Sorry" but a dismissive "Oops". Later, when Flynn tries to argue with her to abandon their mission, instead of reasoning with him she answers with "''I will use this''" holding up the pan that she had knocked him unconsicous unconscious with three times, menacingly to his face (imagine if it was a man that says to a woman "I will knock you out" to make her do his will during a dispute).


* ''Disney/{{Tangled}}'': Rapunzel's unnecessary and played-for-laughs physical violence against Flynn when they first meet. It's justified that she initially knocks him unconscious (twice), since he is an intruder. But then once he is unconscious, instead of physically restraining him by tying him up, she goes to put his unconscious body in her clouset, which takes several attempts during which he endures a lot of physical abuse (all played for laughs). Then she ties him up to a chair (which she could have done to begin with, making the clouset scene and abuse unnecessary). She knocks him unconscious for a ''third'' time while he is tied down (again unnecessary and he was physically restrained this time). When she accidentally lets the chair he is tied up to fall down so he falls on his face on the floor, she doesn't say "Sorry" but a dismissive "Oops". Later, when Flynn tries to argue with her to abandon their mission, instead of reasoning with him she answers with "''I will use this''" holding up the pan that she had knocked him unconsicous with three times, menacingly to his face (imagine if it was a man that says to a woman "I will knock you out" to make her do his will during a dispute).

to:

* ''Disney/{{Tangled}}'': Rapunzel's unnecessary and played-for-laughs physical violence against Flynn when they first meet. It's justified that she initially knocks him unconscious (twice), since he is an intruder. But then once he is unconscious, instead of physically restraining him by tying him up, she goes to put his unconscious body in her clouset, closet, which takes several attempts during which he endures a lot of physical abuse (all played for laughs). Then she ties him up to a chair (which she could have done to begin with, making the clouset closet scene and abuse unnecessary). She knocks him unconscious for a ''third'' time while he is tied down (again unnecessary and he was physically restrained this time). When she accidentally lets the chair he is tied up to fall down so he falls on his face on the floor, she doesn't say "Sorry" but a dismissive "Oops". Later, when Flynn tries to argue with her to abandon their mission, instead of reasoning with him she answers with "''I will use this''" holding up the pan that she had knocked him unconsicous with three times, menacingly to his face (imagine if it was a man that says to a woman "I will knock you out" to make her do his will during a dispute).

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