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* While Microsoft Office 2007 introduced some new features that were well-received, its introduction of the ribbon interface saw considerable controversy. The ribbon took up a good portion of the screen at the cost of usable editing space (exacerbating the problem in Word where you would have to either constantly scroll up or spend most of your time looking at the bottom of the screen if you typed a lot) and was not customisable without third-party tools. Many features were shuffled around and renamed, which made the ribbon even more confusing to use for Office veterans. On top of that, Office 2007 was a RAM hog, making it crippingly slow even on machines with 4GB of RAM, although this was fixed as of Service Pack 3 in 2011. Eventually, the problems that plagued the ribbon in Office 2007 were resolved: future Office versions allowed ribbon customisation out of the box, users got used to the interface, and the screen cluttering became less of an issue as larger screen resolutions became more commonplace.

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* While Microsoft Office 2007 introduced some new features that were well-received, well-received (and removed the infamous Office Assistant entirely), its introduction of the ribbon interface saw considerable controversy. The ribbon took up a good portion of the screen at the cost of usable editing space (exacerbating the problem in Word where you would have to either constantly scroll up or spend most of your time looking at the bottom of the screen if you typed a lot) and was not customisable without third-party tools. Many features were shuffled around and renamed, which made the ribbon even more confusing to use for Office veterans. On top of that, Office 2007 was a RAM hog, making it crippingly slow even on machines with 4GB of RAM, although this was fixed as of Service Pack 3 in 2011. Eventually, the problems that plagued the ribbon in Office 2007 were resolved: future Office versions allowed ribbon customisation out of the box, users got used to the interface, and the screen cluttering became less of an issue as larger screen resolutions became more commonplace.



** The program is 32-bit, and puts itself in the Program Files folder instead of Program Files (x86) on a 64-bit computer.

to:

** The program is 32-bit, and puts itself in the Program Files folder instead of Program Files (x86) on a computer running a 64-bit computer.version of Windows.



* With the development of Windows 10, Microsoft released an update for older operating systems that does nothing except pester users to get the new OS. This would merely be annoying if it didn't cause the occasional error, slow down boot time, and use lag-inducing amounts of processing power. All for the purpose of informing users of Windows 7 and 8 about an OS that hadn't even been released yet.
** Even after getting rid of the update that caused those annoying pop-ups, [[TheThingThatWouldNotLeave they keep coming back]]! Microsoft just kept getting more and more aggressive in their campaign for 1 billion machines with Windows 10 installed. Rather than annoying users relentlessly, they shortly turned to trickery to force users into installing it with misleading pop-ups, users consent or not. When angry users complained about Microsoft's unethical and devious tactics, they played it it off as unfortunate update errors or blamed it on the users. [[http://en.rocketnews24.com/2016/05/20/windows-10s-annoying-updates-come-alive-in-twitter-artists-cute-yet-horrifying-manga/ Mercilessly parodied here.]]
** In its relentless drive to get users to upgrade, Microsoft offered Windows 10 for free to users of Windows 7 and 8 as an optional update through Windows Update. Many users have Windows Update set to "download optional updates and ask before installing". Cue ''4 GB'' of data being delivered to users in countries with low data caps or on netbook type devices with minimal onboard storage. Regular Windows updates are several orders of magnitude smaller. It got so out of hand that a local news station doing the day's weather had an update prompt pop up on the weather map ''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VMPeTrHNX1U during the live broadcasting]]'' and a few hotels had their entire systems bricked.

to:

* With the development and release of Windows 10, Microsoft released an update for older operating systems Windows 7 and 8.1 that does did nothing except pester users to get the new OS. This would merely be annoying if it didn't cause the occasional error, slow down boot time, and use lag-inducing amounts of processing power. All power, all for the purpose of informing users of Windows 7 and 8 8.1 about an OS that hadn't even been released yet.
** Even after getting rid of the update that caused those annoying pop-ups, [[TheThingThatWouldNotLeave they keep kept coming back]]! Microsoft just kept getting more and more aggressive in their campaign for 1 billion machines with Windows 10 installed. Rather than annoying users relentlessly, they shortly turned to trickery to force users into installing it with misleading pop-ups, users consent or not. When angry users complained about Microsoft's unethical and devious tactics, they played it it off as unfortunate update errors or blamed it on the users. [[http://en.rocketnews24.com/2016/05/20/windows-10s-annoying-updates-come-alive-in-twitter-artists-cute-yet-horrifying-manga/ Mercilessly parodied here.]]
** In its relentless drive to get users to upgrade, Microsoft offered Windows 10 for free to users of Windows 7 and 8 8.1 as an optional update through Windows Update. Many users have Windows Update set to "download optional updates and ask before installing". Cue ''4 GB'' of data being delivered to users in countries with low data caps or on netbook type devices with minimal onboard storage. Regular Windows updates are several orders of magnitude smaller. It got so out of hand that a local news station doing the day's weather had an update prompt pop up on the weather map ''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VMPeTrHNX1U during the live broadcasting]]'' and a few hotels had their entire systems bricked.



* If you thought GUI programming in general was bad (see below), well, Microsoft has you covered. Windows has ''five'' separate GUI toolkits ([=Win32=], MFC, Forms, WPF and Metro). [=Win32=] is the one all others are implemented on top of, but its (never used nowadays) default settings produce UI that look like the ones in ''Windows 3.1''. MFC is a C++ library on top of it, but was designed before C++ was fully standardized and comprises numerous ugly hacks such as DIY exception management and classes that ''simulate'' diamond inheritance. Windows Forms is the much cleaner .NET-based equivalent and WPF is supposed to be the revolutionary new interface for the Windows desktop, but Microsoft roughly alternates between apparently abandoning each one. And then comes Metro, better known as "who put a smartphone UI in my desktop?".

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* If you thought GUI programming in general was bad (see below), well, Microsoft has you covered. Windows has ''five'' separate GUI toolkits ([=Win32=], MFC, Forms, WPF and Metro). [=Win32=] is the one all others are implemented on top of, but its (never used nowadays) default settings produce UI controls that look like the ones in ''Windows 3.1''. MFC is a C++ library on top of it, but was designed before C++ was fully standardized and comprises numerous ugly hacks such as DIY exception management and classes that ''simulate'' diamond inheritance. Windows Forms is the much cleaner .NET-based equivalent and WPF is supposed to be the revolutionary new interface for the Windows desktop, but Microsoft roughly alternates between apparently abandoning each one. And then comes came Metro, better known as "who put a smartphone UI in on my desktop?".



*** Microsoft appears to be trying to fix this with the introduction of the native code C++/CX and UWP in Windows 10. In fact, the aggressive pushing of the Windows 10 upgrade likely to be partly motivated to maximize the availability of this system to developers.
** It's also kind of bad if you want to program in Ruby. Or Python. Or Factor. Or any language whose low-level libraries are written in C, which is practically all of them. Because of the awkwardness of the Windows native UI libraries, they tend to use cross-platform UNIX-based ones; which often have very badly maintained Windows ports, and again produce software that looks more than 10 years old without extensive retooling. (Java is the one exception.)

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*** Microsoft appears to be trying to fix this with the introduction of the native code C++/CX and UWP in Windows 10. In fact, the aggressive pushing of the Windows 10 upgrade was likely to be partly motivated to maximize the availability of this system to developers.
** It's also kind of bad if you want to program in Ruby. Or Python. Or Factor. Or any language whose low-level libraries are written in C, which is practically all of them. Because of the awkwardness of the Windows native UI libraries, they tend to use cross-platform UNIX-based ones; ones, which often have very badly maintained Windows ports, and again produce software that looks more than 10 years old without extensive retooling. retooling (Java is the one exception.)



* For a year or so, Windows 10 had multiple bugs and slow-downs until Microsoft incrementally updated these problems as a token of good will. These annoyances (along with many new mandatory features) did not help Windows 10's negative image in the eyes of the owners of previous versions of Windows.\\

to:

* For a year or so, Windows 10 had multiple bugs and slow-downs until Microsoft incrementally updated these problems as a token of good will.goodwill. These annoyances (along with many new mandatory features) did not help Windows 10's negative image in the eyes of the owners of previous versions of Windows.\\



On startup if Windows 10 detects a problem with the hardware, it will scan through as usual. [[LoadsAndLoadsOfLoading After making a slowass scan of the whole system]], it invites the user to click on the repair button, except the mouse and the keyboard may not be responding. With no way to initiate repairs, the OS is utterly useless.\\

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On startup startup, if Windows 10 detects a problem with the hardware, it will scan through as usual. [[LoadsAndLoadsOfLoading After making a slowass scan of the whole system]], it invites the user to click on the repair button, except the mouse and the keyboard may not be responding. With no way to initiate repairs, the OS is utterly useless.\\



* Windows 10's start menu search got a little... overzealous... with its internet integration, to the point where web results are frequently prioritised over things readily found in major directories on your own hard drive, so good luck trying to remember where you left that file Cortana sure as hell isn't lifting a finger to help. The Windows Explorer system search fortunately still works for finding mislaid files.

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* Windows 10's start menu search got a little... overzealous... with its internet Internet integration, to the point where web results are frequently prioritised over things readily found in major directories on your own hard drive, so good luck trying to remember where you left that file Cortana sure as hell isn't lifting a finger to help. The Windows Explorer system search fortunately still works for finding mislaid files.



* Windows Aero (now Metro) may look cool, but there's many programs (especially ones that make use of transparency layers) that flat out do not display correctly if Aero is turned on.

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* Windows Aero (now Metro) (Metro in Windows 8 and later) may look cool, but there's there are many programs (especially ones that make use of transparency layers) that flat out do not display correctly if Aero is turned on.


** On May 3rd, 2019, a bug was introduced that disabled all addons and the ability to install them, under the false pretense that they could not be verified (for security reasons, this verification is a good step). Reinstalling them didn't work because Firefox declared in a canned response: ''"download failed. please check your connection."'' This could alarm some people if they have security-based extensions to protect from known browser attacks, and suddenly they're turned off (like the browser has been hijacked). Fortunately, a temporary fix was found by navigating ''Options\Privacy and Security\Firefox Data Collection and Use\View Firefox Studies'' and updating the studies list.

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** On May 3rd, 2019, a bug was introduced that signing certificate used by Firefox addons expired, which disabled all addons and the ability to install them, under the false pretense that they could not be verified (for security reasons, this verification is a good step). Reinstalling them didn't work because Firefox declared in a canned response: ''"download failed. please check your connection."'' This could alarm some people if they have security-based extensions to protect from known browser attacks, and suddenly they're turned off (like the browser has been hijacked). Fortunately, a temporary fix was found by navigating ''Options\Privacy and Security\Firefox Data Collection and Use\View Firefox Studies'' and updating the studies list.


With a company which specialized on an operating system that's made to work for many different computer systems, do you think it will be really, really flawless?.

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With a company which specialized on an operating system that's made to work for many different computer systems, do you think it will be really, really flawless?.flawless?


** On May 3th, 2019, a bug was introduced that disabled all addons and the ability to install them, under the false pretense that they could not be verified (for security reasons, this verification is a good step). Reinstalling them didn't work because Firefox declared in a canned response: ''"download failed. please check your connection."'' This could alarm some people if they have security-based extensions to protect from known browser attacks, and suddenly they're turned off (like the browser has been hijacked). Fortunately, a temporary fix was found by navigating ''Options\Privacy and Security\Firefox Data Collection and Use\View Firefox Studies'' and updating the studies list.

to:

** On May 3th, 3rd, 2019, a bug was introduced that disabled all addons and the ability to install them, under the false pretense that they could not be verified (for security reasons, this verification is a good step). Reinstalling them didn't work because Firefox declared in a canned response: ''"download failed. please check your connection."'' This could alarm some people if they have security-based extensions to protect from known browser attacks, and suddenly they're turned off (like the browser has been hijacked). Fortunately, a temporary fix was found by navigating ''Options\Privacy and Security\Firefox Data Collection and Use\View Firefox Studies'' and updating the studies list.


* vBulletin 5 has this in spades. Thousands of bugs? Check. Bugs that let members do things like figure out what private sections exist, not search/view more pages/post if [=JavaScript=] is disabled? Check. Changing every aspect of the URL structure on upgrade in one fell swoop and completely mauling the site's search engine rankings? Check again. There's even [[http://vbtruth.com/vbulletin-5-code-review-by-rafio/460/ a code review]] that breaks down the poorly programming line by line that's filled with examples of Idiot Programming and inconsistency.

to:

* vBulletin 5 has this in spades. Thousands of bugs? Check. Bugs that let members do things like figure out what private sections exist, not search/view more pages/post if [=JavaScript=] is disabled? Check. Changing every aspect of the URL structure on upgrade in one fell swoop and completely mauling the site's search engine rankings? Check again. There's even [[http://vbtruth.com/vbulletin-5-code-review-by-rafio/460/ a code review]] that breaks down the poorly poor programming line by line that's filled with examples of Idiot Programming and inconsistency.inconsistency line by line.


* Firefox 4's temporary file deletion algorithm was an unusual, since it was actually pretty effective at deleting older files and freeing up large amounts of disk space. It suffered a major problem, though, in that it chewed up huge amounts of CPU power and maxed out the hard drive in the process, which could slow your entire system to a crawl. Worse still, there was no way of aborting the cleanup routine, and if you killed the Firefox process, it would just invoke the file cleaner again as soon as you restarted the browser. It wasn't until Firefox 5 that the file cleaner got fixed, using much less CPU power and still being fairly disk-intensive, but not to the same extent as previously.

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* Mozilla Firefox:
**
Firefox 4's temporary file deletion algorithm was an unusual, since it was actually pretty effective at deleting older files and freeing up large amounts of disk space. It suffered a major problem, though, in that it chewed up huge amounts of CPU power and maxed out the hard drive in the process, which could slow your entire system to a crawl. Worse still, there was no way of aborting the cleanup routine, and if you killed the Firefox process, it would just invoke the file cleaner again as soon as you restarted the browser. It wasn't until Firefox 5 that the file cleaner got fixed, using much less CPU power and still being fairly disk-intensive, but not to the same extent as previously.


* Firefox 4's temporary file deletion algorithm was an unusual, since it was actually pretty effective at deleting older files and freeing up large amounts of disk space. It suffered a major problem, though, in that it chewed up huge amounts of CPU power and maxed out the hard drive in the process, which could slow your entire system to a crawl. Worse still, there was no way of aborting the cleanup routine, and if you killed the Firefox process, it would just invoke the file cleaner again as soon as you restarted the browser. It wasn't until Firefox 5 that the file cleaner got fixed, using much less CPU power and still being fairly disk-intensive, but not to the same extent as previously.
** Firefox had an update that changed the system for syncing your passwords. This allowed recovery of accounts in case of losing your master decoder key, but had an outrageous problem: You could no longer sync passwords with a master password set on your Firefox user, requiring the user to disable it and then check-off passwords in the sync list. Thankfully, Mozilla updated this problem, and all is well again.
** Syncing Firefox accounts makes it very convenient to keep your computers up to date with each other, but syncing for the first time causes the browser to eat CPU cycles -- for a while -- like narcotics. All this just to download data from a server and import it into the browser?
** On May 3th, 2019, a bug was introduced that disabled all addons and the ability to install them, under the false pretense that they could not be verified (for security reasons, this verification is a good step). Reinstalling them didn't work because Firefox declared in a canned response: ''"download failed. please check your connection."'' This could alarm some people if they have security-based extensions to protect from known browser attacks, and suddenly they're turned off (like the browser has been hijacked). Fortunately, a temporary fix was found by navigating ''Options\Privacy and Security\Firefox Data Collection and Use\View Firefox Studies'' and updating the studies list.



* Firefox 4's temporary file deletion algorithm was an unusual, since it was actually pretty effective at deleting older files and freeing up large amounts of disk space. It suffered a major problem, though, in that it chewed up huge amounts of CPU power and maxed out the hard drive in the process, which could slow your entire system to a crawl. Worse still, there was no way of aborting the cleanup routine, and if you killed the Firefox process, it would just invoke the file cleaner again as soon as you restarted the browser. It wasn't until Firefox 5 that the file cleaner got fixed, using much less CPU power and still being fairly disk-intensive, but not to the same extent as previously.
** Firefox had an update that changed the system for syncing your passwords. This allowed recovery of accounts in case of losing your master decoder key, but had an outrageous problem: You could no longer sync passwords with a master password set on your Firefox user, requiring the user to disable it and then check-off passwords in the sync list. Thankfully, Mozilla updated this problem, and all is well again.
** Syncing Firefox accounts makes it very convenient to keep your computers up to date with each other, but syncing for the first time causes the browser to eat CPU cycles -- for a while -- like narcotics. All this just to download data from a server and import it into the browser?
** On May 3th, 2019, a bug was introduced that disabled all addons and the ability to install them, under the false pretense that they could not be verified (for security reasons, this verification is a good step). Reinstalling them didn't work because Firefox declared in a canned response: ''"download failed. please check your connection."'' This could alarm some people if they have security-based extensions to protect from known browser attacks, and suddenly they're turned off (like the browser has been hijacked). Fortunately, a temporary fix was found by navigating ''Options\Privacy and Security\Firefox Data Collection and Use\View Firefox Studies'' and updating the studies list.


[[folder:Browser Baloney]]
* Firefox:
** Firefox 4's temporary file deletion algorithm was an unusual, since it was actually pretty effective at deleting older files and freeing up large amounts of disk space. It suffered a major problem, though, in that it chewed up huge amounts of CPU power and maxed out the hard drive in the process, which could slow your entire system to a crawl. Worse still, there was no way of aborting the cleanup routine, and if you killed the Firefox process, it would just invoke the file cleaner again as soon as you restarted the browser. It wasn't until Firefox 5 that the file cleaner got fixed, using much less CPU power and still being fairly disk-intensive, but not to the same extent as previously.
** Firefox had an update that changed the system for syncing your passwords. This allowed recovery of accounts in case of losing your master decoder key, but had an outrageous problem: You could no longer sync passwords with a master password set on your Firefox user, requiring the user to disable it and then check-off passwords in the sync list. Thankfully, Mozilla updated this problem, and all is well again.
** Syncing Firefox accounts makes it very convenient to keep your computers up to date with each other, but syncing for the first time causes the browser to eat CPU cycles -- for a while -- like narcotics. All this just to download data from a server and import it into the browser?
** On May 3th, 2019, a bug was introduced that disabled all addons and the ability to install them, under the false pretense that they could not be verified (for security reasons, this verification is a good step). Reinstalling them didn't work because Firefox declared in a canned response: ''"download failed. please check your connection."'' This could alarm some people if they have security-based extensions to protect from known browser attacks, and suddenly they're turned off (like the browser has been hijacked). Fortunately, a temporary fix was found by navigating ''Options\Privacy and Security\Firefox Data Collection and Use\View Firefox Studies'' and updating the studies list.
[[/folder]]

to:

[[folder:Browser Baloney]]
* Firefox:
** Firefox 4's temporary file deletion algorithm was an unusual, since it was actually pretty effective at deleting older files and freeing up large amounts of disk space. It suffered a major problem, though, in that it chewed up huge amounts of CPU power and maxed out the hard drive in the process, which could slow your entire system to a crawl. Worse still, there was no way of aborting the cleanup routine, and if you killed the Firefox process, it would just invoke the file cleaner again as soon as you restarted the browser. It wasn't until Firefox 5 that the file cleaner got fixed, using much less CPU power and still being fairly disk-intensive, but not to the same extent as previously.
** Firefox had an update that changed the system for syncing your passwords. This allowed recovery of accounts in case of losing your master decoder key, but had an outrageous problem: You could no longer sync passwords with a master password set on your Firefox user, requiring the user to disable it and then check-off passwords in the sync list. Thankfully, Mozilla updated this problem, and all is well again.
** Syncing Firefox accounts makes it very convenient to keep your computers up to date with each other, but syncing for the first time causes the browser to eat CPU cycles -- for a while -- like narcotics. All this just to download data from a server and import it into the browser?
** On May 3th, 2019, a bug was introduced that disabled all addons and the ability to install them, under the false pretense that they could not be verified (for security reasons, this verification is a good step). Reinstalling them didn't work because Firefox declared in a canned response: ''"download failed. please check your connection."'' This could alarm some people if they have security-based extensions to protect from known browser attacks, and suddenly they're turned off (like the browser has been hijacked). Fortunately, a temporary fix was found by navigating ''Options\Privacy and Security\Firefox Data Collection and Use\View Firefox Studies'' and updating the studies list.
[[/folder]]


Added DiffLines:

* Firefox 4's temporary file deletion algorithm was an unusual, since it was actually pretty effective at deleting older files and freeing up large amounts of disk space. It suffered a major problem, though, in that it chewed up huge amounts of CPU power and maxed out the hard drive in the process, which could slow your entire system to a crawl. Worse still, there was no way of aborting the cleanup routine, and if you killed the Firefox process, it would just invoke the file cleaner again as soon as you restarted the browser. It wasn't until Firefox 5 that the file cleaner got fixed, using much less CPU power and still being fairly disk-intensive, but not to the same extent as previously.
** Firefox had an update that changed the system for syncing your passwords. This allowed recovery of accounts in case of losing your master decoder key, but had an outrageous problem: You could no longer sync passwords with a master password set on your Firefox user, requiring the user to disable it and then check-off passwords in the sync list. Thankfully, Mozilla updated this problem, and all is well again.
** Syncing Firefox accounts makes it very convenient to keep your computers up to date with each other, but syncing for the first time causes the browser to eat CPU cycles -- for a while -- like narcotics. All this just to download data from a server and import it into the browser?
** On May 3th, 2019, a bug was introduced that disabled all addons and the ability to install them, under the false pretense that they could not be verified (for security reasons, this verification is a good step). Reinstalling them didn't work because Firefox declared in a canned response: ''"download failed. please check your connection."'' This could alarm some people if they have security-based extensions to protect from known browser attacks, and suddenly they're turned off (like the browser has been hijacked). Fortunately, a temporary fix was found by navigating ''Options\Privacy and Security\Firefox Data Collection and Use\View Firefox Studies'' and updating the studies list.


[[folder:Browser Baloney]]
* Firefox:
** Firefox 4's temporary file deletion algorithm was an unusual, since it was actually pretty effective at deleting older files and freeing up large amounts of disk space. It suffered a major problem, though, in that it chewed up huge amounts of CPU power and maxed out the hard drive in the process, which could slow your entire system to a crawl. Worse still, there was no way of aborting the cleanup routine, and if you killed the Firefox process, it would just invoke the file cleaner again as soon as you restarted the browser. It wasn't until Firefox 5 that the file cleaner got fixed, using much less CPU power and still being fairly disk-intensive, but not to the same extent as previously.
** Firefox had an update that changed the system for syncing your passwords. This allowed recovery of accounts in case of losing your master decoder key, but had an outrageous problem: You could no longer sync passwords with a master password set on your Firefox user, requiring the user to disable it and then check-off passwords in the sync list. Thankfully, Mozilla updated this problem, and all is well again.
** Syncing Firefox accounts makes it very convenient to keep your computers up to date with each other, but syncing for the first time causes the browser to eat CPU cycles -- for a while -- like narcotics. All this just to download data from a server and import it into the browser?
** On May 3th, 2019, a bug was introduced that disabled all addons and the ability to install them, under the false pretense that they could not be verified (for security reasons, this verification is a good step). Reinstalling them didn't work because Firefox declared in a canned response: ''"download failed. please check your connection."'' This could alarm some people if they have security-based extensions to protect from known browser attacks, and suddenly they're turned off (like the browser has been hijacked). Fortunately, a temporary fix was found by navigating ''Options\Privacy and Security\Firefox Data Collection and Use\View Firefox Studies'' and updating the studies list.
[[/folder]]



* Firefox:
** Firefox 4's temporary file deletion algorithm was an unusual, since it was actually pretty effective at deleting older files and freeing up large amounts of disk space. It suffered a major problem, though, in that it chewed up huge amounts of CPU power and maxed out the hard drive in the process, which could slow your entire system to a crawl. Worse still, there was no way of aborting the cleanup routine, and if you killed the Firefox process, it would just invoke the file cleaner again as soon as you restarted the browser. It wasn't until Firefox 5 that the file cleaner got fixed, using much less CPU power and still being fairly disk-intensive, but not to the same extent as previously.
** Firefox had an update that changed the system for syncing your passwords. This allowed recovery of accounts in case of losing your master decoder key, but had an outrageous problem: You could no longer sync passwords with a master password set on your Firefox user, requiring the user to disable it and then check-off passwords in the sync list. Thankfully, Mozilla updated this problem, and all is well again.
** Syncing Firefox accounts makes it very convenient to keep your computers up to date with each other, but syncing for the first time causes the browser to eat CPU cycles -- for a while -- like narcotics. All this just to download data from a server and import it into the browser?
** On May 3th, 2019, a bug was introduced that disabled all addons and the ability to install them, under the false pretense that they could not be verified (for security reasons, this verification is a good step). Reinstalling them didn't work because Firefox declared in a canned response: ''"download failed. please check your connection."'' This could alarm some people if they have security-based extensions to protect from known browser attacks, and suddenly they're turned off (like the browser has been hijacked). Fortunately, a temporary fix was found by navigating ''Options\Privacy and Security\Firefox Data Collection and Use\View Firefox Studies'' and updating the studies list.


** On May 3th, 2019, a bug was introduced that disabled all addons and the ability to install them, under the false pretense that they could not be verified (for security reasons, this verification is a good step). Reinstalling them didn't work because Firefox declared in a canned response: ''"download failed. please check your connection."'' This could alarm some people if they have security-based extensions to protect from known browser attacks, and suddenly they're turned off (like the browser has been hijacked). Fortunately, a temporary fix was found by navigating ''Options \ Privacy and Security \ Firefox Data Collection and Use \ View Firefox Studies'' and updating the studies list.

to:

** On May 3th, 2019, a bug was introduced that disabled all addons and the ability to install them, under the false pretense that they could not be verified (for security reasons, this verification is a good step). Reinstalling them didn't work because Firefox declared in a canned response: ''"download failed. please check your connection."'' This could alarm some people if they have security-based extensions to protect from known browser attacks, and suddenly they're turned off (like the browser has been hijacked). Fortunately, a temporary fix was found by navigating ''Options \ Privacy ''Options\Privacy and Security \ Firefox Security\Firefox Data Collection and Use \ View Use\View Firefox Studies'' and updating the studies list.

Added DiffLines:

** On May 3th, 2019, a bug was introduced that disabled all addons and the ability to install them, under the false pretense that they could not be verified (for security reasons, this verification is a good step). Reinstalling them didn't work because Firefox declared in a canned response: ''"download failed. please check your connection."'' This could alarm some people if they have security-based extensions to protect from known browser attacks, and suddenly they're turned off (like the browser has been hijacked). Fortunately, a temporary fix was found by navigating ''Options \ Privacy and Security \ Firefox Data Collection and Use \ View Firefox Studies'' and updating the studies list.


** 3 PC magazines in Europe had their copies of the ''Videogame/SiN'' demo infected with "[[https://www.symantec.com/security-center/writeup/2000-122010-2655-99 CIH]]", a rather infamous worm that, on the 26th of every month, overwrites your hard disk with random nonsense until your system crashes, and then ''corrupts your Flash BIOS'' essentially bricking your PC and putting it beyond repair (which was unintentional, by the way)
** Thankfully, those discs are extremely rare nowadays, and even those who got one working found out that those viruses only affect older Windows 9X operating system series.

to:

** 3 PC magazines in Europe had their copies of the ''Videogame/SiN'' demo infected with "[[https://www.symantec.com/security-center/writeup/2000-122010-2655-99 CIH]]", a rather infamous worm that, on the 26th of every month, overwrites your hard disk with random nonsense until your system crashes, and then ''corrupts your Flash BIOS'' essentially bricking your PC and putting it beyond repair (which was unintentional, by the way)
** Thankfully, those discs are extremely rare nowadays, and even those who got one working found out that those viruses only affect older Windows 9X operating system series.
way).


With great market share comes great exposure to malicious coders. Keep those virus definitions updated, and Windows Updates downloading.

to:

With great market share comes great exposure a company which specialized on an operating system that's made to malicious coders. Keep those virus definitions updated, and Windows Updates downloading.work for many different computer systems, do you think it will be really, really flawless?.



* The Zune software. The interface is fine, but at first it devoured RAM and took up way too much CPU power for what it does. Each subsequent release managed to improve performance, though, to the point where as of Version 4 even machines that don't have much higher than the minimum specs can run it with all the visual effects turned on with little to no problem. iTunes, on the other hand, started at bloated garbage and got even more slow and bloated over time.

to:

* The The(now-defunct) Zune software. The interface is fine, but at first it devoured RAM and took up way too much CPU power for what it does. Each subsequent release managed to improve performance, though, to the point where as of Version 4 even machines that don't have much higher than the minimum specs can run it with all the visual effects turned on with little to no problem. iTunes, on the other hand, started at bloated garbage and got even more slow and bloated over time.



** It's so bad that Microsoft ''blacklisted its own program'' in Windows 8.1. If you attempt to install GFWL, it will ask "This program has compatibility issues, do you want to run it?"
* Unfortunately for gamers, once Microsoft attempted supporting hardcore gamers again on PC on Windows 10, said gamers discovered that the Microsoft Store is an absolute ''disaster''. No offline play, issues downloading games, and now requiring patches to play a game at all, even in single player, and the way downloading patches works essentially means you need to have enough space on your hard drive to be able to ''download the entire game again'' just to patch it, among other issues. Some gamers are claiming that these issues make GFWL look ''competent by comparison'', with many considering it the second incarnation of GFWL. No wonder PC games such as ''VideoGame/QuantumBreak'' and ''VideoGame/RiseOfTheTombRaider'' have sold terribly on the Microsoft Store, in the realm of ''single-digit percentage'' of total sales with the rest being the Steam versions.
** Then there's the UWP format, which is essentially an attempt to replace the standard [=Win32=] executable. Except not only is it severely locked down and limited as far as PC gamers are concerned, the way the DRM works also clearly wasn't thought through well enough -- ''Forza Horizon 3'' at least has a DRM system involving encrypting and decrypting sections of the game data in real-time when said data is needed. Problem is, this is a massive performance hog, and doesn't mesh well with an open-world driving game that loads sections of its game world on the fly, resulting in massive performance drops.

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** It's so bad that Microsoft ''blacklisted its own program'' in Windows 8.1. If you attempt to install GFWL, it will ask "This program has compatibility issues, do you want to run it?"
it?" However, in Windows 10, running a GFWL game without GFWL might call Program Compatibility Assistant who "helpfully" suggest you to install GFWL...
* Unfortunately for gamers, once Microsoft attempted supporting hardcore gamers again on PC on Windows 10, said gamers discovered that the Microsoft Store is an absolute ''disaster''. No offline play, Drive space limitations, issues downloading games, and now requiring patches to play a game at all, even in single player, the fact that the Store client refuse to run if the Windows 10 version is slightly outdated, and the way downloading patches works essentially means you need to have enough space on your hard drive to be able to ''download the entire game again'' just to patch it, among other issues. Some gamers are claiming that these issues make GFWL look ''competent by comparison'', with many considering it the second incarnation of GFWL. No wonder PC games such as ''VideoGame/QuantumBreak'' and ''VideoGame/RiseOfTheTombRaider'' have sold terribly on the Microsoft Store, in the realm of ''single-digit percentage'' of total sales with the rest being the Steam versions.
** Then there's the UWP format, which is essentially an attempt to replace the standard [=Win32=] executable. Except not only is it severely locked down and limited as far as PC gamers are concerned, the way the DRM works also clearly wasn't thought through well enough -- ''Forza Horizon 3'' at least has a DRM system involving encrypting and decrypting sections of the game data in real-time when said data is needed. Problem is, this is a massive performance hog, and doesn't mesh well with an open-world driving game that loads sections of its game world on the fly, resulting in massive performance drops. Baffling because Denuvo did the same thing with little performance hog. Thankfully Microsoft Studios learned their mistakes, as shown in how Forza Horizon 4, which runs on UWP, was massively better optimized...



* Windows 10's start menu search got a little... overzealous... with its internet integration, to the point where web results are frequently prioritised over things readily found in major directories on your own hard drive, so good luck trying to remember where you left that file Cortana sure as hell isn't lifting a finger to help. The Windows Explorer system search fortunately still works for finding mislaid files, but, it having to methodically search your entire computer, can and will take longer than you want to wait for it.

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* Windows 10's start menu search got a little... overzealous... with its internet integration, to the point where web results are frequently prioritised over things readily found in major directories on your own hard drive, so good luck trying to remember where you left that file Cortana sure as hell isn't lifting a finger to help. The Windows Explorer system search fortunately still works for finding mislaid files, but, it having to methodically search your entire computer, can and will take longer than you want to wait for it.files.



Finally, after an April 2019 patch was determined to cause certain computers to freeze at boot, Microsoft publicized that they'd allow users to decline updates (after reluctance to add such a feature since releasing Windows 10 in 2015). This incident finally motivated Microsoft to better test for fatal updates. One of the causes of said freezes were the [=OS=] fighting with ''anti-virus software'', which you would think Microsoft would take into account since such software is vital for a Windows computer.

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Finally, after an April 2019 patch was determined to cause certain computers to freeze at boot, Microsoft publicized that they'd allow users to decline updates (after reluctance to add such a feature since releasing Windows 10 in 2015). This incident finally motivated Microsoft to better test for fatal updates. One of the causes of said freezes were the [=OS=] fighting with ''anti-virus software'', which you would think Microsoft would take into account since such software is vital for a Windows computer. However, there is a set limit to decline updates, namely until the end of support for the current build of Windows 10.



* One EasterEgg that was common with a lot of UsefulNotes/SegaDreamcast games was that if you were to put the disc into a PC, you'd find extras on it. ''VideoGame/{{Atelier}} Marie: The Alchemist of Salburg'' did this, and included a screensaver. However, whoever's idea this was apparently didn't scan their machine for viruses first, as the screensaver was infected with [[https://www.symantec.com/security-center/writeup/2000-122014-2500-99 a virus called "Kriz"]]. If the user is unfortunate enough to install the screensaver, the virus ''completely wipes the BIOS'' if the PC's clock is set to Christmas[[note]]A lot of early computer viruses were programmed to activate their payloads on certain dates in an attempt to avoid antivirus databases from picking it up so quickly[[/note]]. The game was later reprinted with a non-infected version of the screensaver, and later re-releases lack it completely.

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* A lot of security pundits said you got risk of malwares by downloading pirated content. However, legitimately purchased contents might be hiding some nasty surprises... Here's are some of the infamous but unintentional cases.
**
One EasterEgg that was common with a lot of UsefulNotes/SegaDreamcast games was that if you were to put the disc into a PC, you'd find extras on it. ''VideoGame/{{Atelier}} Marie: The Alchemist of Salburg'' did this, and included a screensaver. However, whoever's idea this was apparently didn't scan their machine for viruses first, as the screensaver was infected with [[https://www.symantec.com/security-center/writeup/2000-122014-2500-99 a virus called "Kriz"]]. If the user is unfortunate enough to install the screensaver, the virus ''completely wipes the BIOS'' if the PC's clock is set to Christmas[[note]]A lot of early computer viruses were programmed to activate their payloads on certain dates in an attempt to avoid antivirus databases from picking it up so quickly[[/note]]. The game was later reprinted with a non-infected version of the screensaver, and later re-releases lack it completely.



** 3 PC magazines in Europe had their copies of the ''Videogame/SiN'' demo infected with "[[https://www.symantec.com/security-center/writeup/2000-122010-2655-99 CIH]]", a rather infamous worm that, on the 26th of every month, overwrites your hard disk with random nonsense until your system crashes, and then ''corrupts your Flash BIOS'' essentially bricking your PC and putting it beyond repair (which was unintentional, by the way) Thankfully, those discs are extremely rare nowadays, and even those who got one working found out that those viruses only affect older Windows 9X operating system series.

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** 3 PC magazines in Europe had their copies of the ''Videogame/SiN'' demo infected with "[[https://www.symantec.com/security-center/writeup/2000-122010-2655-99 CIH]]", a rather infamous worm that, on the 26th of every month, overwrites your hard disk with random nonsense until your system crashes, and then ''corrupts your Flash BIOS'' essentially bricking your PC and putting it beyond repair (which was unintentional, by the way) way)
**
Thankfully, those discs are extremely rare nowadays, and even those who got one working found out that those viruses only affect older Windows 9X operating system series.


This is perplexing as the UsefulNotes/{{Linux}} Extensible series of file systems seamlessly manages file fragments on mechanical drivers without any user input. One may wonder why Windows 10 can't have such an optional toggle for on-the-fly file consolidation at certain intervals.\\

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This is perplexing as the UsefulNotes/{{Linux}} Extensible series of file systems seamlessly manages file fragments on mechanical drivers drives without any user input. One may wonder why Windows 10 can't have such an optional toggle for on-the-fly file consolidation at certain intervals.\\


** [[https://www.androidauthority.com/microsoft-edge-sabotage-936422/ Google literally bottlenecked Microsoft Edge]] so that [=YouTube=] performs worse on it. This was an attempt to sabotage the browser who's video playback capabilities normally outdid Chrome by a long shot. Apparently, [[https://www.neowin.net/news/former-edge-intern-says-google-sabotaged-microsofts-browser this isn't the first time they've done this]]. And sadly, [[https://www.theinquirer.net/inquirer/news/3068413/google-sabotage-microsoft-edge it seems that Microsoft is finally caving in]].

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** [[https://www.androidauthority.com/microsoft-edge-sabotage-936422/ Google literally bottlenecked Microsoft Edge]] so that [=YouTube=] performs worse on it. This was an attempt to sabotage the browser who's browser's video playback capabilities capabilities, which normally outdid Chrome by a long shot. Apparently, [[https://www.neowin.net/news/former-edge-intern-says-google-sabotaged-microsofts-browser this isn't the first time they've done this]]. And sadly, [[https://www.theinquirer.net/inquirer/news/3068413/google-sabotage-microsoft-edge it seems that Microsoft is finally caving in]].

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