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* ''Literature/MedusasWeb''


* CreatorInJoke: When Tim Powers and James Blaylock were in college together, they invented a fake poet named "William Ashbless" to satirize the quality of their college's literary magazine. Nearly every novel Powers and Blaylock have written has had a reference to Ashbless in it somewhere -- most famously ''The Anubis Gates'', in which he appears as a major character.

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* CreatorInJoke: When Tim Powers and James Blaylock Creator/JamesPBlaylock were in college together, they invented a fake poet named "William Ashbless" to satirize the quality of their college's literary magazine. Nearly every novel Powers and Blaylock have written has had a reference to Ashbless in it somewhere -- most famously ''The Anubis Gates'', in which he appears as a major character.


* ''Literature/HideMeAmongTheGraves''



* OurGhostsAreDifferent: In ''Hide Me Among the Graves'' ghosts are just fragments of people's souls and memories that eventually wander into streams and rivers and are carried out gradually to the ocean where they join and decay with other ghosts.


Timothy Thomas Powers (born February 29, 1952) is an American science fiction and fantasy writer. His breakout novel was ''Literature/TheAnubisGates'', published in 1983. Other novels include ''Literature/{{Declare}}'', ''Literature/DinnerAtDeviantsPalace'', ''Literature/TheDrawingOfTheDark'', ''Earthquake Weather'', ''Literature/ExpirationDate'', ''Literature/LastCall'', ''Literature/OnStrangerTides'', ''Literature/TheStressOfHerRegard'', and ''Literature/ThreeDaysToNever''.

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Timothy Thomas Powers (born February 29, 1952) is an American science fiction and fantasy writer. His breakout novel was ''Literature/TheAnubisGates'', published in 1983. Other novels include ''Literature/{{Declare}}'', ''Literature/DinnerAtDeviantsPalace'', ''Literature/TheDrawingOfTheDark'', ''Earthquake Weather'', ''Literature/EarthquakeWeather'', ''Literature/ExpirationDate'', ''Literature/LastCall'', ''Literature/OnStrangerTides'', ''Literature/TheStressOfHerRegard'', and ''Literature/ThreeDaysToNever''.



* ''Literature/EarthquakeWeather''



* CanonWelding:
** ''Earthquake Weather'' is a sequel to both ''Expiration Date'' and ''Last Call'', with characters returning from both.
** "Nobody's Home" is a ghost story using the ghost lore from ''Expiration Date'' and ''Hide Me Among the Graves'' but set during ''The Anubis Gates''.

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* CanonWelding:
** ''Earthquake Weather'' is a sequel to both ''Expiration Date'' and ''Last Call'', with characters returning from both.
**
CanonWelding: "Nobody's Home" is a ghost story using the ghost lore from ''Expiration Date'' and ''Hide Me Among the Graves'' but set during ''The Anubis Gates''.



* ElectromagneticGhosts: Ghosts in ''Last Call'', ''Expiration Date'', and ''Earthquake Weather'' affect compasses, make telephone calls, and appear on TV sets to communicate important information.



* FisherKing: The legend of the Fisher King is central to ''Literature/LastCall'' and its sequel ''Earthquake Weather''. It is also mentioned in ''Expiration Date'', which forms a trilogy with ''Last Call'' and ''Earthquake Weather''.



* SplitPersonality: The female lead in ''Earthquake Weather'' suffered a trauma in her childhood that has resulted in her having over a dozen different personalities, some of whom like the male lead more than others [[spoiler:and one of whom is an actual ghost that attempted to possess her, initiating the fracturing that produced the others]].



* StolenGoodReturnedBetter: In ''Earthquake Weather'', fugitive Cody steals a car, picking one that's a few decades old because it's easier to hotwire. She does some work on it while it's in her hands, so when the owner eventually gets it back it's in better condition than it was when she stole it.


Tim Powers is an American science fiction and fantasy writer. His breakout novel was ''Literature/TheAnubisGates'', published in 1983. Other novels include ''Literature/{{Declare}}'', ''Literature/DinnerAtDeviantsPalace'', ''Literature/TheDrawingOfTheDark'', ''Earthquake Weather'', ''Literature/ExpirationDate'', ''Literature/LastCall'', ''Literature/OnStrangerTides'', ''Literature/TheStressOfHerRegard'', and ''Literature/ThreeDaysToNever''.

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Tim Timothy Thomas Powers (born February 29, 1952) is an American science fiction and fantasy writer. His breakout novel was ''Literature/TheAnubisGates'', published in 1983. Other novels include ''Literature/{{Declare}}'', ''Literature/DinnerAtDeviantsPalace'', ''Literature/TheDrawingOfTheDark'', ''Earthquake Weather'', ''Literature/ExpirationDate'', ''Literature/LastCall'', ''Literature/OnStrangerTides'', ''Literature/TheStressOfHerRegard'', and ''Literature/ThreeDaysToNever''.


* SteamPunk: The term "steampunk" was coined by K. W. Jeter to describe the speculative fiction stories in a Victorian setting that he, Powers and James Blaylock were writing in the early 1980s.

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* SteamPunk: The term "steampunk" was coined by K. W. Jeter Creator/KWJeter to describe the speculative fiction stories in a Victorian setting that he, Powers and James Blaylock were writing in the early 1980s.

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* SplitPersonality: The female lead in ''Earthquake Weather'' suffered a trauma in her childhood that has resulted in her having over a dozen different personalities, some of whom like the male lead more than others [[spoiler:and one of whom is an actual ghost that attempted to possess her, initiating the fracturing that produced the others]].


* IKnowYourTrueName: In "Down and Out in Purgatory", the dead use nicknames, because a person's true name can be used against them by another dead person or by a living spiritualist.

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* IKnowYourTrueName: In "Down and Out in Purgatory", the dead use nicknames, because a person's true name can be used against them by another dead person or by a living spiritualist. Played with when the protagonist attempts to locate his dead love interest using her true name, and it completely fails at first because he always thinks of her by her maiden name, as she was when he first knew her; it works when he switches to using the name of the married woman she had become when she died.

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* AfterlifeAntechamber: The setting of "Down and Out in Purgatory" is a transitional afterlife occupied by people who aren't yet ready to let go of the living world and move on to whatever eternity has in store (which remains undepicted, although several of the characters have theories).
* BackFromTheDead: The goal of some of the characters in "Down and Out in Purgatory"; it's rumored in the purgatory that there's a secret method that will allow a dead person to be reborn in a new body instead of going on into eternity. [[spoiler:The protagonist searches for it himself, but gives up on it when he learns that it's just a particularly ruthless refinement on ghostly possession--the secret is that instead of possessing an adult body you find an unborn child, kick its soul out while it's still too small and weak to fight back, and keep its body for yourself.]]


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* CruelMercy: In "Down and Out in Purgatory", the protagonist abandons his plan to kill his enemy DeaderThanDead when he realizes the man is terrified of the judgment that awaits him in the afterlife and would welcome oblivion as an escape from it.
* DeaderThanDead: In "Down and Out in Purgatory", the protagonist is out for revenge on the man who murdered his love interest, and when the man cheats him of his revenge by dying, follows him into the afterlife with the goal of killing his soul deader than dead.


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* IKnowYourTrueName: In "Down and Out in Purgatory", the dead use nicknames, because a person's true name can be used against them by another dead person or by a living spiritualist.


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* LovingAShadow: The protagonist of "Down and Out in Purgatory" spent his whole adult life devoted to a woman who he never had a chance with, and eventually died for her sake. When they meet in the afterlife, she suggests that he wasn't really interested in her as a person, only as an unattainable goal.
* MeaningfulName: In "Down and Out in Purgatory", the overseer of the purgatory, who helps the inhabitants move on into the afterlife, is called Hubcap Pete; he has some characteristics in common with Saint Peter, who is said to stand at the gates of heaven welcoming people in. It's explicitly not the name he was known by in the living world, so he may have chosen it deliberately for the resonance.


* BeethovenWasAnAlienSpy: A recurring feature.
* BodySnatcher: A recurring feature.

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* %%* BeethovenWasAnAlienSpy: A recurring feature.
* %%* BodySnatcher: A recurring feature.



* {{Doppelganger}}: A recurring feature.
* EarnYourHappyEnding: A recurring feature. Nearly every book runs on this trope, and few of Power's characters survive their arc without making some major sacrifices along the way, be it of blood, love, flesh, or memory.

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* %%* {{Doppelganger}}: A recurring feature.
* %%* EarnYourHappyEnding: A recurring feature. Nearly every book runs on this trope, and few of Power's characters survive their arc without making some major sacrifices along the way, be it of blood, love, flesh, or memory.



* {{Epigraph}}: A recurring feature.
* {{Fingore}}: Something horrible happens to at least one character's hands or fingers in each book.

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* %%* {{Epigraph}}: A recurring feature.
* %%* {{Fingore}}: Something horrible happens to at least one character's hands or fingers in each book.



* GrandTheftMe: A recurring feature.

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* %%* GrandTheftMe: A recurring feature.



* HistoricalDomainCharacter: A recurring feature.
* HistoricalFantasy: A recurring feature.
* ImmortalityImmorality: Shows up again and again in his work.

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* %%* HistoricalDomainCharacter: A recurring feature.
* %%* HistoricalFantasy: A recurring feature.
* %%* ImmortalityImmorality: Shows up again and again in his work.



* UrbanFantasy: A recurring feature.
* WhoWantsToLiveForever
* YouCantFightFate: A recurring feature on any occasion that involves time travel.

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* %%* UrbanFantasy: A recurring feature.
* %%* WhoWantsToLiveForever
* %%* YouCantFightFate: A recurring feature on any occasion that involves time travel.


* OurGhostsAreDifferent:
** In ''Hide Me Among the Graves'' ghosts are just fragments of people's souls and memories that eventually wander into streams and rivers and are carried out gradually to the ocean where they join and decay with other ghosts.
* SeeingThroughAnothersEyes:
** In the short story "Pat Moore" a man meets the ghost of his wife, who, having no eyes of her own, can see only what he can see.

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* OurGhostsAreDifferent:
**
OurGhostsAreDifferent: In ''Hide Me Among the Graves'' ghosts are just fragments of people's souls and memories that eventually wander into streams and rivers and are carried out gradually to the ocean where they join and decay with other ghosts.
* SeeingThroughAnothersEyes:
**
SeeingThroughAnothersEyes: In the short story "Pat Moore" a man meets the ghost of his wife, who, having no eyes of her own, can see only what he can see.


''Literature/OnStrangerTides'' became the basis for the fourth movie in Disney's ''Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbean'' series, as well as being an inspiration for the ''VideoGame/MonkeyIsland'' series of games.

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''Literature/OnStrangerTides'' became the basis for the [[Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanOnStrangerTides fourth movie movie]] in Disney's ''Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbean'' ''Franchise/PiratesOfTheCaribbean'' series, as well as being an inspiration for the ''VideoGame/MonkeyIsland'' series of games.

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* {{Confessional}}: In "Through and Through", a priest is visited in the confessional by the ghost of a recently-deceased parishioner, who is unable to move on because he refused to assign her a penance the last time she came to confession. (Not because he considered her beyond absolution, but because he's a progressive-minded post-Vatican II priest and didn't think the transgression she was confessing to counted as a sin requiring absolution in the first place.)


Tim Powers is an American science fiction and fantasy writer. His breakout novel was ''Literature/TheAnubisGates'', published in 1983. Other novels include ''Literature/{{Declare}}'', ''Dinner at Deviant's Palace'', ''Literature/TheDrawingOfTheDark'', ''Earthquake Weather'', ''Literature/ExpirationDate'', ''Literature/LastCall'', ''Literature/OnStrangerTides'', ''Literature/TheStressOfHerRegard'', and ''Literature/ThreeDaysToNever''.

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Tim Powers is an American science fiction and fantasy writer. His breakout novel was ''Literature/TheAnubisGates'', published in 1983. Other novels include ''Literature/{{Declare}}'', ''Dinner at Deviant's Palace'', ''Literature/DinnerAtDeviantsPalace'', ''Literature/TheDrawingOfTheDark'', ''Earthquake Weather'', ''Literature/ExpirationDate'', ''Literature/LastCall'', ''Literature/OnStrangerTides'', ''Literature/TheStressOfHerRegard'', and ''Literature/ThreeDaysToNever''.



* ''Literature/DinnerAtDeviantsPalace''



* EnergyEconomy: In ''Dinner at Deviant's Palace'', the dominant currency in a ScavengerWorld L.A. is a high-proof distilled alcohol: useable as a fuel, a disinfectant, or as plain ol' booze, hence much in demand.



* ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin: ''Dinner at Deviant's Palace''
* FatBastard:
** The protagonist mistakes Norton Jaybush for a leather beanbag chair at first glance in ''Dinner At Deviant's Palace''.



* NoMrBondIExpectYouToDine: ''Dinner at Deviant's Palace''



* ScavengerWorld: ''Dinner at Deviant's Palace''


Tim Powers is an American science fiction and fantasy writer. His breakout novel was ''Literature/TheAnubisGates'', published in 1983. Other novels include ''Literature/{{Declare}}'', ''Dinner at Deviant's Palace'', ''Literature/TheDrawingOfTheDark'', ''Earthquake Weather'', ''Literature/ExpirationDate'', ''Literature/LastCall'', ''Literature/OnStrangerTides'', ''Literature/TheStressOfHerRegard'', and ''Three Days to Never''.

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Tim Powers is an American science fiction and fantasy writer. His breakout novel was ''Literature/TheAnubisGates'', published in 1983. Other novels include ''Literature/{{Declare}}'', ''Dinner at Deviant's Palace'', ''Literature/TheDrawingOfTheDark'', ''Earthquake Weather'', ''Literature/ExpirationDate'', ''Literature/LastCall'', ''Literature/OnStrangerTides'', ''Literature/TheStressOfHerRegard'', and ''Three Days to Never''.
''Literature/ThreeDaysToNever''.



* ''Literature/ThreeDaysToNever''



* BadassIsraeli: The Mossad team in ''Three Days to Never''



** ''Three Days To Never'' has a truly unconventional [[TimeTravel time machine]] created by UsefulNotes/AlbertEinstein as a result of his exploration into astral projection and the Sephirot, with Creator/CharlieChaplin lending a hand at some point.



* DemonicPossession:
** In ''Three Days to Never'', though the characters refer to it by the Jewish term "dybbuk", and it's actually [[spoiler:the vengeful ghost, not of somebody who died badly, but of somebody who was never born]].



* FutureMeScaresMe: The plot of ''Three Days to Never'' is complicated by the arrival of a future version of one of the characters, who is dangerously determined to prevent the course of events that produced him.
* GenderRestrictedAbility: In ''Three Days to Never'', certain magical powers are restricted by gender; one of the characters is a sorcerer who, it turns out, was born female and went to extreme lengths to gain access to male magic.



* InstantDramaJustAddTracheotomy: An emergency tracheotomy performed by a non-professional is a key plot event in ''Three Days to Never''. It's not a neat Hollywood tracheotomy, though, and has serious repercussions.
* LiteraryWorkOfMagic: In ''Three Days To Never'', it turns out Creator/CharlieChaplin worked symbolic imagery into ''City Lights'' as part of a magical ritual to attempt to bring his son back from the dead. An earlier movie he'd worked on but never shown to the public is part of the {{MacGuffin}}; AlbertEinstein had to talk Chaplin out of showing the movie, as the mojo generated by the imagery would likely fry some audience brains.



** In ''Three Days to Never'' ghosts experience time backwards, so if one has the proper apparatus (involving [[spoiler:the specially prepared mummified head of someone chosen to be a medium]]) they can talk to ghosts to get hints of the future.



* PsychicLink:
** There's one between the protagonist of ''Three Days to Never'' and his daughter, that grows stronger over the course of the novel.
* PsychicPowers: Several characters in ''Three Days to Never'' have versions of Remote Viewing ability.
* PunnyName: Powers occasionally gives characters names that are puns on ecclesiastical Latin catchphrases, apparently just for the lulz. Examples include "Libra Nosamalo", who appears in ''Three Days to Never''.
* RetGone: The villains of ''Three Days to Never'' can do this to a person.



** One of the characters in ''Three Days to Never'' is blind, but can see through the eyes of people near her. The ramifications and limitations are explored in some depth.
* SetRightWhatOnceWentWrong: ''Three Days to Never'' has, unusually for Powers, a version of time travel in which it's actually possible to change the past, and several people attempt to make use of it (generally with unpleasant consequences regardless of how noble their motives are).
* SpyFiction: The Mossad subplot of ''Three Days to Never''.



* TimeTravel: ''Three Days to Never'' revolves around the search for Albert Einstein's time machine.

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