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History Creator / RobertAHeinlein

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* AlienGeometries: In "And He Built a Crooked House" a Hollywood architect sells a friend and his wife on a new house built with tesselacts. There wind up being drawbacks, such as the fact that when you go in you don't really know where you'll be when you come out.

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* {{Omnibus}}: {{Creator/Servire}} published a [[{{Doorstopper}} 500+ page volume]] in 1970, titled ''Science Fiction Omnibus'', a Dutch translation of four American ScienceFiction {{Novel}}s; ''Literature/TheBigEye'' by Creator/MaxEhrlich, ''Literature/TheManWhoSoldTheMoon'' by Creator/RobertAHeinlein, ''Literature/{{Requiem}}'' by Creator/RobertAHeinlein, and ''Literature/PebbleInTheSky'' by Creator/IsaacAsimov.


* TheMole: In "Coventry", "Fader" [=McGee=] is a Secret Service agent.



* ReverseMole: In "Coventry", "Fader" [=McGee=] is a Secret Service agent.

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* ImmortalityPromiscuity: Lazarus Long, prominent in novels like ''Literature/MethuselahsChildren and ''Literature/TimeEnoughForLove'' lives for millennia and by the 40th century is a common ancestor to a majority of the long-lived Howards, largely due to DarwinistDesire. He does tend to marry most of his lovers, but is also polyamorous.

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* HoverBot: ''Friday''. Police had Public Eyes that they used to perform surveillance. The Eyes had cameras that allowed an officer monitoring them to see what was going on, with a memory that could hold 12 hours of visual record. An unmonitored Public Eye floated around, following any object with the temperature of a human body.


* ArtificialGravity: In "--We Also Walk Dogs", a company that advertises that it can with any problem is called on to bring about the invention of antigravity, to enable an interstellar peace conference whose delegates mostly come from planets with lower gravity than Earth.

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* ArtificialGravity: In "--We Also Walk Dogs", a company that advertises that it can deal with any problem is called on to bring about the invention of antigravity, to enable an interstellar peace conference whose delegates mostly come from planets with lower gravity than Earth.

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* ViewersAreGeniuses: Heinlein never dumbed down his juvenile sci-fi novels, as he wanted to encourage his readers to become interested in science.


* Masquerade: In a number of stories, mainly relating to the nature of the universe. Usually has to do with the questions of creation, creator, and the fabric of the universe itself.

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* Masquerade: {{Masquerade}}: In a number of stories, mainly relating to the nature of the universe. Usually has to do with the questions of creation, creator, and the fabric of the universe itself.


* VenusIsWet: Venus is depicted as a swamp planet in the short stories "Logic of Empire" and "Tenderfoot on Venus".

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* VenusIsWet: Venus is depicted as a swamp planet in the short stories "Logic of Empire" and "Tenderfoot on Venus".Venus", and in the novels "Between Planets" and "Space Cadet".


[[caption-width-right:300:Robert Heinlein and his wife on the set of ''Film/DestinationMoon'' (1950)]]

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[[caption-width-right:300:Robert Heinlein and his wife Virginia on the set of ''Film/DestinationMoon'' (1950)]]

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* CelestialBureaucracy: Taken to 11 in ''Job.'' Inverted in ''Hoag'' with the Sons of the Bird.


* EurekaMoment: Played with, in ''Hoag,'' when the title character suddenly remembers who he is, mid-sentence, and even his personality and tone changes.



* Masquerade: In a number of stories, mainly relating to the nature of the universe. Usually has to do with the questions of creation, creator, and the fabric of the universe itself.
** In ''Number of the Beast,'' we are introduced to the notion of fiction as literal universe-building, raising the spectre of a SlidingScaleOfFreeWillVsFate.
** In ''Job,'' ''Hoag,'' and others; particularly that [[spoiler: the universe can be changed, erased, and even recreated at will by God... or ''a'' god]].



* MissingTime: In "The Unpleasant Profession Of Jonathan Hoag", the title character experiences this every time he goes to work -- everything between leaving home in the morning and returning in the evening is a blank. He hires a private detective to find out what it is he actually does.

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* MissingFloor: In ''Hoag,'' one of the protagonists track down where the title character works, [[spoiler: but when he goes back to the building with his partner to show them, the floor doesn't exist.]]
* MissingTime: In "The Unpleasant Profession Of Jonathan Hoag", the title character experiences this every time he goes to work -- everything between leaving home in the morning and returning in the evening is a blank. He hires a private detective to find out what it is he actually does. [[spoiler: It turns out to be AlternateIdentityAmnesia.]]


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* OutDamnedSpot: In ''Hoag,'' the title character comes home every day with red gunk under his fingernails, which he then compulsively scrubs clean.


Widely considered one of the most influential and iconic writers of SciFi and SpeculativeFiction of the Twentieth Century. He is counted as one of the "Big Three" of ScienceFiction along with Creator/ArthurCClarke and Creator/IsaacAsimov. Often the standard to which other {{science fiction}} writers are compared, although he caught considerable flak for some of his [[WriterOnBoard recurring philosophical and political themes.]] His works range from space adventure Young Adult novels to political manifestos, and generally score towards the "hard" side of MohsScaleOfScienceFictionHardness.

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Widely Robert Anson Heinlein (July 7, 1907 May 8, 1988) is widely considered one of the most influential and iconic writers of SciFi and SpeculativeFiction of the Twentieth Century. He is counted as one of the "Big Three" of ScienceFiction along with Creator/ArthurCClarke and Creator/IsaacAsimov. Often the standard to which other {{science fiction}} writers are compared, although he caught considerable flak for some of his [[WriterOnBoard recurring philosophical and political themes.]] His works range from space adventure Young Adult novels to political manifestos, and generally score towards the "hard" side of MohsScaleOfScienceFictionHardness.


[[caption-width-right:300:Robert Heinlein and his wife on the set of ''DestinationMoon'' (1950)]]

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[[caption-width-right:300:Robert Heinlein and his wife on the set of ''DestinationMoon'' ''Film/DestinationMoon'' (1950)]]


* ''Literature/{{Gulf}}''



* ''Literature/{{Gulf}}''



* CapturedOnPurpose: "Gulf". When FBS agent Joseph Briggs is captured by Mrs. Keithley's men, "Kettle Belly" Baldwin (the leader of a secret society of geniuses) tricks them into thinking he's also an FBS agent so they'll capture him too. His plan is that Mrs. Keithley's operatives will put him and Briggs together so he can trick Briggs into telling him where the "Nova Effect" document has been sent. Later he and Briggs break out together.



* CounterEarth: "Gulf" has a downplayed variation. In the BackStory, an asteroid called "Earth-Anti" that is always on the other side of the Sun from Earth is destroyed by the "nova effect", a type of hydrogen bomb that can turn a planet into a nova.



* DoomsdayDevice: The Nova Bomb in "Gulf", capable of destroying entire planets.



* EarthShatteringKaboom: In "Gulf", the nova bomb is a theoretical bomb that could destroy the entire Earth.



* GiveMeBackMyWallet: Happens near the beginning of the novella "Gulf". FBS (Federal Bureau of Security) agent Joe Briggs grabs the hand of a pickpocket as he's picking Joe's pocket. Subverted when the pickpocket turns out to be a secret agent who had ''already'' switched the wallet for a duplicate.



* LanguageEqualsThought: "Gulf" features a one-phoneme-per-concept "Speedtalk."



* NeckSnap: In "Gulf", "Kettle Belly" Baldwin killed a guard this way when he and "Captain Gilead" escaped from the New Age Hotel.
* NoPlansNoPrototypeNoBackup: In "Gulf", there were plans and prototypes for the "nova effect", but they were destroyed as a security measure, along with everyone involved in creating it receiving hypnotic instructions to forget about it. Two sets of microfilms were made: one was to be taken to Earth for safe keeping, and a backup version was to be destroyed once the first set was safe. After a secret agent arrived on Earth with the first set the order was given to destroy the backups. Unfortunately the agent was pursued by the enemy and had to get rid of the first set before he could deliver them, and they were lost.



* RedPillBluePill: "Gulf". When former FBS agent Joseph Briggs goes to "Kettle Belly" Baldwin to try to find out what's going on, Kettle Belly offers to set him up anywhere in the world with an air-tight secret identity and enough cash for a new start. Kettle Belly warns him that this offer is his only chance for a normal, happy life and that if he doesn't take it and gets the answers he's looking for, his life expectancy will significantly decrease. Briggs insists on the truth and ends up joining Kettle Belly's secret society of geniuses.



* SecretTest:
** In the short story "Space Jockey", spaceship pilots are monitored to make sure they are psychologically stable. A space pilot is bothered by a "stupid tourist" who is secretly a psychiatrist to determine his state of mind before a flight.
** In the novella "Gulf", Joseph Briggs is being trained so he can join a secret society of geniuses. His teacher tests his personality in several ways, including not letting him eat or sleep, inflicting intense pain and subtly trying to goad him into irrational actions. He passes with flying colors, continuing to act rationally and reliably.

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* SecretTest:
**
SecretTest: In the short story "Space Jockey", spaceship pilots are monitored to make sure they are psychologically stable. A space pilot is bothered by a "stupid tourist" who is secretly a psychiatrist to determine his state of mind before a flight.
** In the novella "Gulf", Joseph Briggs is being trained so he can join a secret society of geniuses. His teacher tests his personality in several ways, including not letting him eat or sleep, inflicting intense pain and subtly trying to goad him into irrational actions. He passes with flying colors, continuing to act rationally and reliably.
flight.



* StaticStunGun: "Gulf" features a static stun gun called a "Markheim".



* SuperBreedingProgram: "Gulf" features a secret group of superintelligent humans who are engaged in a number of long term plans, including a breeding program to increase their own numbers as well as become a physically distinct species no longer capable of interbreeding with homo sapiens.
* TalkingThroughTechnique: In "Gulf", two supergenius spies locked in a monitored cell communicate through a game of cards.

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