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'''The Hair and other sexuality symbolism'''

In addition to the crown-virginity theory, Rapunzel's hair can also represent awakening sexuality, or more generally turning from a child into an adult. While the hair is light, long and magical, she's a girl, not developed into a woman yet (also meaningful because lighter hair tends to go together with youthfulness: many light-haired children naturally develop into much darker-haired adults).

During the "Kingdom" scenes, it is braided for what we can assume the first time in her life, making it much shorter. This is accompanied with dancing with other people for the first time (with an ecstatic look on her face at the end of the "Kingdom Dance" song), and her and Flynn's first starting to realize their romantic feelings for each other.

Mother Gothel pointedly unbraids the hair upon their return to the tower; like a parent having difficulty accepting a child growing up, especially the developing sexual maturity side of it.

Then it gets cut into short and brown: fully sexual awakening.

Also, "the chalice and the blade" are symbols for femininity / the woman (plus the element of water), vs. masculinity / the male (in pagan rituals a blade was sometimes dipped in a chalice full of water or wine to symbolize a union of the masculine with the feminine, in a sense that could range from metaphorical to the physical sense). The tear symbolizes "the chalice" (being of water, coming from Rapunzel, and being healing) and the mirror shard that cuts the hair is "the blade" (literally used as one).


It would also make that scene that much more significant and heartbreaking. In this scene, Rapunzel tells Flynn that she was afraid, but now she wasnít and then gives him the crown. Then when Rapunzel thinks that Flynn took the crown and left, she is devastated to the point that she willingly goes back home with her manipulative and cruel ďmotherĒ. If we equate the crown with Rapunzelís virginity, then her giving it to Flynn becomes a sexual act: she is giving him her virginity. She is no longer scared because she trusts him. Then when she believes that he has left her, Rapunzelís devastation is now a product of the real life fear that many girls have: trusting a guy with her virginity and having him basically spit and trample all over that trust. Traumatizing, indeed.

to:

It would also make that scene that much more significant and heartbreaking. In this scene, Rapunzel tells Flynn that she was afraid, but now she wasnít and then gives him the crown. Then when Rapunzel thinks that Flynn took the crown and left, she is devastated to the point that she willingly goes back home with her manipulative and cruel ďmotherĒ. If we equate the crown with Rapunzelís virginity, then her giving it to Flynn becomes a sexual act: she is giving him her virginity. She is no longer scared because she trusts him. Then when she believes that he has left her, Rapunzelís devastation is now a product of the real life fear that many girls have: trusting a guy with her virginity and having him basically spit and trample all over that trust. Traumatizing, indeed.indeed.
----


It would also make that scene that much more significant and heartbreaking. In this scene, Rapunzel tells Flynn that she was afraid, but now she wasnít and then gives him the crown. Then when Rapunzel thinks that Flynn took the crown and left, she is devastated to the point that she willingly goes back home with her manipulative and cruel ďmotherĒ. If we equate the crown with Rapunzelís virginity, then her giving it to Flynn becomes a sexual act: she is giving him her virginity. She is no longer scared because she trusts him. Then when she believes that he has left her, Rapunzelís devastation is now a product of the real life fear that many girls have: trusting a guy with her virginity and having him basically spit and trample all over that rust. Traumatizing, indeed.

to:

It would also make that scene that much more significant and heartbreaking. In this scene, Rapunzel tells Flynn that she was afraid, but now she wasnít and then gives him the crown. Then when Rapunzel thinks that Flynn took the crown and left, she is devastated to the point that she willingly goes back home with her manipulative and cruel ďmotherĒ. If we equate the crown with Rapunzelís virginity, then her giving it to Flynn becomes a sexual act: she is giving him her virginity. She is no longer scared because she trusts him. Then when she believes that he has left her, Rapunzelís devastation is now a product of the real life fear that many girls have: trusting a guy with her virginity and having him basically spit and trample all over that rust.trust. Traumatizing, indeed.


For the beginning of Tangled, we have a pretty standard MacGuffin in the crown that Flynn steals from the castle with the Stabbington twins. The theft of it and his subsequent escape from the palace guards are the reason why Flynn stumbles upon Rapunzel. Rapunzel uses the crown to force Flynn to escort her to the palace. Not to mention that Flynnís betrayal of the Stabbingtons so that he could escape and have the crown to himself is the reason why they hate him. When Mother sees the crown later and deduces that Flynn is with Rapunzel, it stops being a MacGuffin, but until then it functions as a fairly average one. However the crown is not simply a MacGuffin; it is a symbol for Rapunzelís virginity.

to:

For the beginning of Tangled, ''Tangled'', we have a pretty standard MacGuffin in the crown that Flynn steals from the castle with the Stabbington twins. The theft of it and his subsequent escape from the palace guards are the reason why Flynn stumbles upon Rapunzel. Rapunzel uses the crown to force Flynn to escort her to the palace. Not to mention that Flynnís betrayal of the Stabbingtons so that he could escape and have the crown to himself is the reason why they hate him. When Mother sees the crown later and deduces that Flynn is with Rapunzel, it stops being a MacGuffin, but until then it functions as a fairly average one. However the crown is not simply a MacGuffin; it is a symbol for Rapunzelís virginity.


It would also make that scene that much more significant and heartbreaking. In this scene, Rapunzel tells Flynn that she was afraid, but now she wasnít and then gives him the crown. Then when Rapunzel thinks that Flynn took the crown and left, she is devastated to the point that she willingly goes back home with her manipulative and cruel ďmotherĒ. If we equate the crown with Rapunzelís virginity, then her giving it to Flynn becomes a sexual act: she is giving him her virginity. She is no longer scared because she trusts him. Then when she believes that he has left her, Rapunzelís devastation is now a product of the real life fear that many girls have: trusting a guy with her virginity and having him basically spit and trample all over that rust. Traumatizing, indeed.

[[WMG: ThePrincessAndTheFrog vs {{Tangled}}: A study in contrasting styles of "modernizing" fairy tales/a study in princess foils changing a similar kind of person]]
Princess and the Frog and Tangled not only are the 49th and 50th of DisneyAnimatedCanon, but are actually very strong contrasts to one another. Coincidentally, they were also both [[{{Understatement}} kinda big deals when they came out.]] One for reviving 2-d animation of Disney (Princess), and one for becoming their second biggest box office gross since Lion King (Tangled). So in a way, they make for a great case study for different ways Disney "modernized" fairy tales after their fall from favor in the Disney Renaissance.

Below, are several key elements both similar and different between these two tales. (still being developed)
* Setting
** Princess: New Orleans, at first circa early 1910's, then circa 1920's (exact date not given)
** Tangled: Roughly late 1700's or so, though again, very ambiguous. (late enough that the piano has been invented on screen, but early enough that gunpowder is not used widely by the soldiers)
*** Observations: of the two, Princess and the Frog has a more "modern" setting, and this creates a very different feel in terms of fairy tales, particularly with the modern sensibilities of restaurants, money, a royalty comfortable in casual clothes and the like. So in a way, Princess is already breaking with disney convention pretty heavy, though since TropesAreTools, not necessarily a bad thing. Tangled is kinda around the same time as some of the older movies are set, but again, kinda ambiguous. In some way, Tangled almost has a little more flexibility in its more fairy tale setting, since Princess and the Frog also uses history to tie down some of its options.
* Lead Character
** Princess: Spunky, tough, no nonsense, {{Workaholic}} waitress named Tiana. Black, TheDeterminator, and with little interest in magic or fairy tales. (in fact, when she was young, she was horrified by The Frog Prince and the kiss that made him a handsome prince. Irony!)
** Tangled: Spunky, tough when necessary but also uncertain, somewhat ditzy but nonetheless determined kidnapped princess named Rapunzel. Naive, but still tough enough to endure 18 years of ParentalAbuse, but with an intense personal connection to magic. (Her HairOfGold)
*** Observations:
* Love Interest
** Princess: Lazy, spoiled, TheCassanova, prince in exile named Naveen. "Maldonian", and despite being selfish and seeking easy solutions to his problems, still is TheCharmer, with a HeartOfGold under his flaws, and the capacity to learn.
** Tangled: Selfish, glory hungry, TheCassanova, number one thief of the kingdom named Flynn Rider. ([[spoiler: Or, as you later find out, Eugene Fitzherbert]]) Wants an easy out from a situation, and perhaps something of an OnlySaneMan at times, but ends up showing an incredible nobility and kindness dealing with his "blondie".
* Animal Sidekicks
** Princess:
*** A jazz playing Aligator named Louis, who helps lead the leads to their destination, while also seeking his own dream to be able to perform in public.
*** Also, a Cajun firefly named Ray, who despite being a bit of a ditz, still is perhaps the most hopeful of the characters, and ends up being instramental in helping them reach the end.
** Tangled
*** A chameleon named Pascal, who was Rapunzel's only friend for years. Gives advise to Rapunzel several times, and even manages to intimidate at times.
*** Also, Maximus. Technically not a sidekick for half the movie, as more of a HeroicAntagonist, chasing down and fighting the leads. Somehow, this makes him seem like the most competent member of the entire royal guard. Finally lightens up after promising Rapunzel not to capture Flynn for 24 hours, and reveals a deep loyalty not only to the crown, but to his friends at a crucial moment.
* Side Characters
* Villain
** Princess: Dr. Facilier. A ClassicVillain, but of a different type, since he's possibly first of the DisneyVillains to embody Sloth to a degree. Long and lanky, with total control of the power of voodoo (though unable to take the simple solution since he can't use it on himself). Wants to become rich, and then fulfill his "debt" to his Friends on the Other Side. Perhaps driven by bitterness to a degree since he works on the street for a few coins while Big Daddy inherited all his money.
* Use of Magic
* Music
* Story
* How the lead and the love interest play off each other
* Other things surrounding production
* Outcome (in story)
* Outcome (box office and critically)

Conclusion: So what does all this mean?

to:

It would also make that scene that much more significant and heartbreaking. In this scene, Rapunzel tells Flynn that she was afraid, but now she wasnít and then gives him the crown. Then when Rapunzel thinks that Flynn took the crown and left, she is devastated to the point that she willingly goes back home with her manipulative and cruel ďmotherĒ. If we equate the crown with Rapunzelís virginity, then her giving it to Flynn becomes a sexual act: she is giving him her virginity. She is no longer scared because she trusts him. Then when she believes that he has left her, Rapunzelís devastation is now a product of the real life fear that many girls have: trusting a guy with her virginity and having him basically spit and trample all over that rust. Traumatizing, indeed.

[[WMG: ThePrincessAndTheFrog vs {{Tangled}}: A study in contrasting styles of "modernizing" fairy tales/a study in princess foils changing a similar kind of person]]
Princess and the Frog and Tangled not only are the 49th and 50th of DisneyAnimatedCanon, but are actually very strong contrasts to one another. Coincidentally, they were also both [[{{Understatement}} kinda big deals when they came out.]] One for reviving 2-d animation of Disney (Princess), and one for becoming their second biggest box office gross since Lion King (Tangled). So in a way, they make for a great case study for different ways Disney "modernized" fairy tales after their fall from favor in the Disney Renaissance.

Below, are several key elements both similar and different between these two tales. (still being developed)
* Setting
** Princess: New Orleans, at first circa early 1910's, then circa 1920's (exact date not given)
** Tangled: Roughly late 1700's or so, though again, very ambiguous. (late enough that the piano has been invented on screen, but early enough that gunpowder is not used widely by the soldiers)
*** Observations: of the two, Princess and the Frog has a more "modern" setting, and this creates a very different feel in terms of fairy tales, particularly with the modern sensibilities of restaurants, money, a royalty comfortable in casual clothes and the like. So in a way, Princess is already breaking with disney convention pretty heavy, though since TropesAreTools, not necessarily a bad thing. Tangled is kinda around the same time as some of the older movies are set, but again, kinda ambiguous. In some way, Tangled almost has a little more flexibility in its more fairy tale setting, since Princess and the Frog also uses history to tie down some of its options.
* Lead Character
** Princess: Spunky, tough, no nonsense, {{Workaholic}} waitress named Tiana. Black, TheDeterminator, and with little interest in magic or fairy tales. (in fact, when she was young, she was horrified by The Frog Prince and the kiss that made him a handsome prince. Irony!)
** Tangled: Spunky, tough when necessary but also uncertain, somewhat ditzy but nonetheless determined kidnapped princess named Rapunzel. Naive, but still tough enough to endure 18 years of ParentalAbuse, but with an intense personal connection to magic. (Her HairOfGold)
*** Observations:
* Love Interest
** Princess: Lazy, spoiled, TheCassanova, prince in exile named Naveen. "Maldonian", and despite being selfish and seeking easy solutions to his problems, still is TheCharmer, with a HeartOfGold under his flaws, and the capacity to learn.
** Tangled: Selfish, glory hungry, TheCassanova, number one thief of the kingdom named Flynn Rider. ([[spoiler: Or, as you later find out, Eugene Fitzherbert]]) Wants an easy out from a situation, and perhaps something of an OnlySaneMan at times, but ends up showing an incredible nobility and kindness dealing with his "blondie".
* Animal Sidekicks
** Princess:
*** A jazz playing Aligator named Louis, who helps lead the leads to their destination, while also seeking his own dream to be able to perform in public.
*** Also, a Cajun firefly named Ray, who despite being a bit of a ditz, still is perhaps the most hopeful of the characters, and ends up being instramental in helping them reach the end.
** Tangled
*** A chameleon named Pascal, who was Rapunzel's only friend for years. Gives advise to Rapunzel several times, and even manages to intimidate at times.
*** Also, Maximus. Technically not a sidekick for half the movie, as more of a HeroicAntagonist, chasing down and fighting the leads. Somehow, this makes him seem like the most competent member of the entire royal guard. Finally lightens up after promising Rapunzel not to capture Flynn for 24 hours, and reveals a deep loyalty not only to the crown, but to his friends at a crucial moment.
* Side Characters
* Villain
** Princess: Dr. Facilier. A ClassicVillain, but of a different type, since he's possibly first of the DisneyVillains to embody Sloth to a degree. Long and lanky, with total control of the power of voodoo (though unable to take the simple solution since he can't use it on himself). Wants to become rich, and then fulfill his "debt" to his Friends on the Other Side. Perhaps driven by bitterness to a degree since he works on the street for a few coins while Big Daddy inherited all his money.
* Use of Magic
* Music
* Story
* How the lead and the love interest play off each other
* Other things surrounding production
* Outcome (in story)
* Outcome (box office and critically)

Conclusion: So what does all this mean?
indeed.


*** Observations: of the two, Princess and the Frog clearly has a more "modern" setting, and this right off the bat creates a very different feel in terms of fairy tales, particularly with the modern sensibilities of restaurants, money, a royalty more comfortable in casual clothes and the like. So in a way, Princess is already breaking with disney convention pretty heavy, though since TropesAreTools, not necessarily a bad thing. Tangled is kinda around the same time as some of the older movies are set, but again, kinda ambiguous. In some way, Tangled almost has a little more flexibility in its more fairy tale setting, since Princess and the Frog also uses history to tie down some of its options.

to:

*** Observations: of the two, Princess and the Frog clearly has a more "modern" setting, and this right off the bat creates a very different feel in terms of fairy tales, particularly with the modern sensibilities of restaurants, money, a royalty more comfortable in casual clothes and the like. So in a way, Princess is already breaking with disney convention pretty heavy, though since TropesAreTools, not necessarily a bad thing. Tangled is kinda around the same time as some of the older movies are set, but again, kinda ambiguous. In some way, Tangled almost has a little more flexibility in its more fairy tale setting, since Princess and the Frog also uses history to tie down some of its options.



** Tangled: Spunky, tough when necessary but also uncertain, somewhat ditzy but nonetheless determined kidnapped princess named Rapunzel.

to:

** Tangled: Spunky, tough when necessary but also uncertain, somewhat ditzy but nonetheless determined kidnapped princess named Rapunzel. Naive, but still tough enough to endure 18 years of ParentalAbuse, but with an intense personal connection to magic. (Her HairOfGold)
*** Observations:


Added DiffLines:

** Princess: Lazy, spoiled, TheCassanova, prince in exile named Naveen. "Maldonian", and despite being selfish and seeking easy solutions to his problems, still is TheCharmer, with a HeartOfGold under his flaws, and the capacity to learn.
** Tangled: Selfish, glory hungry, TheCassanova, number one thief of the kingdom named Flynn Rider. ([[spoiler: Or, as you later find out, Eugene Fitzherbert]]) Wants an easy out from a situation, and perhaps something of an OnlySaneMan at times, but ends up showing an incredible nobility and kindness dealing with his "blondie".


Added DiffLines:

** Princess:
*** A jazz playing Aligator named Louis, who helps lead the leads to their destination, while also seeking his own dream to be able to perform in public.
*** Also, a Cajun firefly named Ray, who despite being a bit of a ditz, still is perhaps the most hopeful of the characters, and ends up being instramental in helping them reach the end.
** Tangled
*** A chameleon named Pascal, who was Rapunzel's only friend for years. Gives advise to Rapunzel several times, and even manages to intimidate at times.
*** Also, Maximus. Technically not a sidekick for half the movie, as more of a HeroicAntagonist, chasing down and fighting the leads. Somehow, this makes him seem like the most competent member of the entire royal guard. Finally lightens up after promising Rapunzel not to capture Flynn for 24 hours, and reveals a deep loyalty not only to the crown, but to his friends at a crucial moment.


Added DiffLines:

** Princess: Dr. Facilier. A ClassicVillain, but of a different type, since he's possibly first of the DisneyVillains to embody Sloth to a degree. Long and lanky, with total control of the power of voodoo (though unable to take the simple solution since he can't use it on himself). Wants to become rich, and then fulfill his "debt" to his Friends on the Other Side. Perhaps driven by bitterness to a degree since he works on the street for a few coins while Big Daddy inherited all his money.




Added DiffLines:


[[WMG: ThePrincessAndTheFrog vs {{Tangled}}: A study in contrasting styles of "modernizing" fairy tales/a study in princess foils changing a similar kind of person]]
Princess and the Frog and Tangled not only are the 49th and 50th of DisneyAnimatedCanon, but are actually very strong contrasts to one another. Coincidentally, they were also both [[{{Understatement}} kinda big deals when they came out.]] One for reviving 2-d animation of Disney (Princess), and one for becoming their second biggest box office gross since Lion King (Tangled). So in a way, they make for a great case study for different ways Disney "modernized" fairy tales after their fall from favor in the Disney Renaissance.

Below, are several key elements both similar and different between these two tales. (still being developed)
* Setting
** Princess: New Orleans, at first circa early 1910's, then circa 1920's (exact date not given)
** Tangled: Roughly late 1700's or so, though again, very ambiguous. (late enough that the piano has been invented on screen, but early enough that gunpowder is not used widely by the soldiers)
*** Observations: of the two, Princess and the Frog clearly has a more "modern" setting, and this right off the bat creates a very different feel in terms of fairy tales, particularly with the modern sensibilities of restaurants, money, a royalty more comfortable in casual clothes and the like. So in a way, Princess is already breaking with disney convention pretty heavy, though since TropesAreTools, not necessarily a bad thing. Tangled is kinda around the same time as some of the older movies are set, but again, kinda ambiguous. In some way, Tangled almost has a little more flexibility in its more fairy tale setting, since Princess and the Frog also uses history to tie down some of its options.
* Lead Character
** Princess: Spunky, tough, no nonsense, {{Workaholic}} waitress named Tiana. Black, TheDeterminator, and with little interest in magic or fairy tales. (in fact, when she was young, she was horrified by The Frog Prince and the kiss that made him a handsome prince. Irony!)
** Tangled: Spunky, tough when necessary but also uncertain, somewhat ditzy but nonetheless determined kidnapped princess named Rapunzel.
* Love Interest
* Animal Sidekicks
* Side Characters
* Villain
* Use of Magic
* Music
* Story
* How the lead and the love interest play off each other
* Other things surrounding production
* Outcome (in story)
* Outcome (box office and critically)

Conclusion: So what does all this mean?


Now, I'm not some English Major or nothing, but has it occured to anyone else that the 'Mother Knows Best' Reprise rings of the same allegory as the Angel-turns-Evil Curse from Buffy? I.E. The girl gives the guy what he wants and he turns from hero to cunt?

to:

Now, I'm not some English Major or nothing, but has it occured to anyone else '''The Crown and Rapunzel's Virginity'''


For the beginning of Tangled, we have a pretty standard MacGuffin in the crown
that Flynn steals from the 'Mother Knows Best' Reprise rings castle with the Stabbington twins. The theft of it and his subsequent escape from the palace guards are the reason why Flynn stumbles upon Rapunzel. Rapunzel uses the crown to force Flynn to escort her to the palace. Not to mention that Flynnís betrayal of the Stabbingtons so that he could escape and have the crown to himself is the reason why they hate him. When Mother sees the crown later and deduces that Flynn is with Rapunzel, it stops being a MacGuffin, but until then it functions as a fairly average one. However the crown is not simply a MacGuffin; it is a symbol for Rapunzelís virginity.

First, it is important to know that technically Rapunzel has had the crown since birth. After all, as the daughter of the king and queen, the princessís crown is hers by birthright. It is something that she wholly owns. However, she didnít always know it was hers because she was kidnapped. She only begins to figure this out later when she goes out into the world and learns more about it and herself. This is not unlike a girlís virginity. It is something she is born with and that she owns. However, many girls donít know what it is until they are older and begin to learn about their bodies and the world around them.

Second, consider Mother Gothelís words to Rapunzel once she finds Rapunzel the first time. Mother Gothel tells Rapunzel that as a mother, she knows that once Rapunzel gives Flynn the crown he will not want to be with her anymore. She says that Flynn doesnít really like her and that he is only sticking around, waiting for Rapunzel to give him the crown; once he has it, he will leave her. If you replace crown with virginity, you get
the same allegory as advice that nearly every mother tells her daughter(s). Mothers tend to warn their daughters to save themselves for the Angel-turns-Evil Curse from Buffy? I.E. The girl one they love and warn them of those that will just use them until they get what they want, i.e. sex.

Third, there is the fact that in the original Grimm version of this story, Rapunzel does give her prince her virginity, leading to a teen pregnancy. This idea of the crown being a symbol for virginity would make sense since by the end of the film, Rapunzel does end up giving Flynn the crown.

It would also make that scene that much more significant and heartbreaking. In this scene, Rapunzel tells Flynn that she was afraid, but now she wasnít and then
gives him the crown. Then when Rapunzel thinks that Flynn took the crown and left, she is devastated to the point that she willingly goes back home with her manipulative and cruel ďmotherĒ. If we equate the crown with Rapunzelís virginity, then her giving it to Flynn becomes a sexual act: she is giving him her virginity. She is no longer scared because she trusts him. Then when she believes that he has left her, Rapunzelís devastation is now a product of the real life fear that many girls have: trusting a guy what he wants with her virginity and he turns from hero to cunt?having him basically spit and trample all over that rust. Traumatizing, indeed.


Now, I'm not some English Major or nothing, but has it occured to anyone else that the 'Mother Knows Best' Reprise rings of the same allegory as the Angel-turns-Evil Curse from Buffy? I.E. The girl gives the guy what he wants and he turns from her to cunt?

to:

Now, I'm not some English Major or nothing, but has it occured to anyone else that the 'Mother Knows Best' Reprise rings of the same allegory as the Angel-turns-Evil Curse from Buffy? I.E. The girl gives the guy what he wants and he turns from her hero to cunt?

Added DiffLines:

Now, I'm not some English Major or nothing, but has it occured to anyone else that the 'Mother Knows Best' Reprise rings of the same allegory as the Angel-turns-Evil Curse from Buffy? I.E. The girl gives the guy what he wants and he turns from her to cunt?

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