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YMMV: Witchblade
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     The anime 

The Anime:

     The Comic 

The comic:

  • Cargo Ship: Sara/Witchblade? Considering the 'Blade is both sentient and male, this may be canonical.
    • It has bonded with men in the past before. So maybe the Witchblade is bi?
  • Fridge Horror: The Witchblade has been wielded by countless women thru the ages, so that means the thing has been...."covering" women in many places for ages. Especially "down there."
  • Growing the Beard: Ron Marz took over with issue #80 and immediately reinvented the wheel. Sara learned how to stop shredding her clothes, the Witchblade began to manifest more often as suits of armor rather than a steel bikini, Sara picked up a regular love interest, and her relationship with the Witchblade and its previous bearers was reexamined. It really is a different book after that point.
  • Les Yay: Back in the day, Top Cow published an ongoing Tomb Raider comic that was actually in continuity with Witchblade, and Lara would occasionally show up to hang out with Sara. During those appearances, they did everything short of make out with one another. When subtext is being screamed into your face at point-blank range, is it still subtext?
    • Not to mention her relationship with Danielle.
      • Danielle is also a confirmed bisexual.
  • My Real Daddy: To a large extent, the current book can be said to have started around the time Ron Marz took over as writer. He jettisoned many of the book's '90s "bad girl" trappings and turned it into a much more satisfying urban fantasy/conspiracy comic.
  • Testosterone Brigade: A good chunk of the fandom.
    • It's doubtful the series was ever marketed at girls.
  • Unfortunate Implications: The Witchblade is said to have bonded to others before, such as Cleopatra and Joan de Arc, famous women. However, this implies that the only reason they were able to become famous was because the Witchblade was helping them, instead of saying that they did everything without help.
    • Joan of Arc is especially tricky. Put the most beloved figure in the history of France, a saint and Technical Pacifist who swore that she had never killed anybody, together with a weapon of mass destruction that often kills people without its wielder even intending to, and say that the voice of God the girl claimed to hear was actually just this weapon? That is playing with fire.
      • To be fair, the series has mentioned that the Witchblade's abilities differ widely from person to person, and that several of the bearers have not been any sort of warrior at all, let alone capable of using it as a weapon. For example, a woman in 1920s Paris who bore the Witchblade was a fairly blatant Expy of Josephine Baker.

     TV series 

The TV series:

  • Foe Yay: Sara and Kenneth Irons, Sara and Ian Nottingham.
  • Jumping the Shark: After the Reset Button Ending of Season One, Season Two just covers the same ground with less suspense. All the character development and discovery went out the window, and Sara laboriously relearned stuff that the audience had found out a year before.
  • Moral Event Horizon: Ken Irons crosses this irrevocably when he burns alive one man's wife and family and drowns another's wife and child just before killing them both for betraying him.
  • Tear Jerker: In the first season, Anyone Can Die. Many of the deaths qualify. Special mentions go to the deaths of Conchobar and Joe Cirus.


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