YMMV: The Flight of Dragons

  • Animation Age Ghetto: Averted and asskicked; the film is dark, serious, violent, somewhat scary in places and unusually metaphysical, while still able to be watched and enjoyed by children.
  • Awesome Music: The title track, by Don McLean. Yes, that Don McLean.
  • Complete Monster: Bryagh is the dark sorcerer Ommadon's literal dragon, and stands out as the only wholly evil dragon in the setting. Seven years prior to the plot, Sir Orrin Neville-Smythe came across Bryagh devouring an entire nest of dragon eggs, and was only stopped from slaughtering the last one by Orrin confronting him. Orrin grimly injures Bryagh, leaving the dragon to wallow in his own hate for seven years before returning to aid his dark master in his ultimate goal of destroying humanity. Throughout the plot, Bryagh is shown to be a vicious Sadist in the skin of a dragon, described as having blood on his mind and relishing the prospect of having his legions "attack, demolish, devour, burn, and grind" his enemies, happily serving Ommadon so long as he gets his kicks out of killing people. He's initially tasked with capturing Peter alive and bringing him to Ommadon; however, upon being pursued by Gorbash, Bryagh drops Peter to his intended death for little reason other than to spite the heroes. In the climax, Bryagh ambushes the Five-Man Band and proceeds to kill Giles and Aragh, and tops it off by killing the archer Danielle, who was Sir Orrin's love interest. Bryagh only pauses his assault to sadistically laugh about this in Orrin's face while he mourns, before both off themselves in a Mutual Kill.
  • Contemptible Cover: Unfortunately, the artist for the video cover apparently hasn't actually seen the movie, and thought the story was about a boy going on an adventure with a jolly wizard and a happy dragon...
    • Averted when the VHS video was originally released in the UK - the cover depicted a scene of Sir Orrin-Neville Smythe facing off against Bryagh (with other dragons in the background, presumably supposed to be their final climactic and mutually-destructive face-off), drawn in the same dark and more realistic art style of the film itself.
  • Cult Classic
  • Genius Bonus: If one listens closely, one can hear that the words of the song with which Sir Orrin is attempting to drown out the Sandmurks are those of "Sumer is icumen in" — the oldest secular song preserved in English. (If you listen closely, you also notice that instead of using the Middle Ages melody, he matches his singing with Peter's to add to the effect against the Sandmurks. Sadly, it doesn't work.)
  • Moment Of Awesome: With the party slain and the protagonist under a sleeping spell, Sir Orrin Neville-Smythe, the Knight In Shining Armour, is the last one standing at the end, facing down the The Dragon Bryagh. He holds his sword up and recites, "Blade with whom I have lived, blade with whom I now die, serve right and justice one last time, seek one last heart of evil, still one last life of pain, cut well old friend, and then farewell." He then gets set on FIRE, takes it like a badass and throws his now-flaming sword into the heart of the dragon, who burns to death in his own flames. Then Orrin dies alongside the rest of his slain party and newfound love.
    • Peter, at the end, has an amazing confrontation with Ommadon using only words. He literally talks him to death, bashing him with scientific equations which burn the magic right out of the old wizard.
    • Aragh, a talking wolf, takes on Bryagh and causes some pain after Giles and Danille' weapons could not hurt the dragon.
  • Moral Event Horizon: Bryagh had crossed this before the plot even started, as Orrin ran afoul of him while he was quite literally eating babies (more specifically, dragon eggs).
  • Narm: Sir Orrin's Heroic Sacrifice would have had more pathos if he hadn't effectively narrated that it cost him his life at the time.
    • Melisande's continual screaming is more annoying than either terrifying or piteous.
  • Spiritual Licensee: Argurably, it's a better Dungeons & Dragons movie than the actual Dungeons & Dragons movie.
  • Tear Jerker: Smrgol dies.