YMMV / Song of the South

  • Adaptation Displacement:
    • The tales of Br'er Rabbit which the book on which the movie was written got preserved, were original African-American folktales. With the suppression of Song Of The South, these folk tales (which would have been lost to time) have also been suppressed. Though the Br'er Rabbit tales themselves can be found in some older Disney "collection" books, usually ones dealing with "Tales From America".
    • These folk tales in turn have been adapted into Dutch Donald Duck comics, where they are known as "Broer Konijn", and tell adventures centered around these three characters, while the bear and fox also appear in "De Grote Boze Wolf" (Big Bad Wolf) comics in the same magazine.
  • Broken Base: People tend to claim either that it's genuinely offensive, or that its critics are suffering from Political Correctness Gone Mad. The film has a cult following, but the cult following is bitterly divided between African Americans who remember it for the folktales and one of the first prominent casting of a black man on film, thirtysomething hipsters who want to watch it due to its mix of notoriety and nostalgia, and older White Southerners who fondly recall its "Uncle Tom"-like aspects and Rose Tinted Narrative of happy black people living in the Old South. This obviously has not given Disney much incentive to re-market the film...
  • Chorus-Only Song: Zip A-Dee Doo-Dah, zip a-dee ay... this has even applied to the ride.
  • Critical Backlash: Due to the above debate. Some find the film funny if white-washing, some can't ignore the Unfortunate Implications, and others just find it really boring.
  • Ear Worm: "Zip-A-Dee-Doo-Dah", "How Do You Do?", "Everybody Has A Laughin' Place", etc. If you haven't seen the movie, these worms may have still found their way in your ear via the Splash Mountain ride, Disney compilation albums, Sing Along Songs videos, and (especially in the case of "Zip-A-Dee-Doo-Dah") general pop cultural usage.
  • Evil Is Sexy: Br'er Fox is this for the female fans of the movie.
  • Fair for Its Day: And arguably not only fair, but brave. This applied to the cast as well. Walt Disney absolutely loved how well James Baskett played the part of Uncle Remus. Originally, the actor was only going to voice an animated animal until Disney gave him the lead. To top it off, Disney put a lot of effort into seeing that Baskett got an honorary Oscar for his performance, making him the first African American man to get any sort of Oscarnote . However, when the film premiered in Atlanta, he still wasn't allowed to attend, on account of racial segregation.
  • Funny Moments: When Br'er Fox has thrown Br'er Rabbit into the briar patch, thinking that would kill him, he takes off his hat in mock respect. Then he doesn't notice that Br'er Bear hasn't taken off his hat and forcefully does it for him.
  • Heartwarming Moment: When all the farm workers are gathered at the door of the plantation, holding a vigil for Johnny (recently injured by the bull).
  • Hilarious in Hindsight: The fact that Disney's film with the strongest anti-racist message stars a rabbit and a fox just like this one, which is often considered one of their most racist film.
  • Idiot Plot: A lot of trouble would’ve been saved had anyone bothered telling Ginny’s brothers that the puppy’s not theirs, so they have no right to drown it (putting aside just how horrifying it is that two children are so cartoonishly evil that they want to drown a puppy), or told Johnny’s mother that he got the puppy fair and square and why he got it in the first place.
  • Just Here for Godzilla: Many people who watch the film watch it just for the animated segments with Br'er Rabbit.
  • Macekre: Disney has occasionally circulated a cut-down version featuring only the animated segments; this still got Bowdlerized a bit for Splash Mountain in particular, Brer Rabbit is caught in a Beehive rather than a Tar Baby.
  • Moment of Awesome: Seeing Ginny's older brothers get what they deserve.
  • Older Than They Think: This movie did not invent B'rer Rabbit.
  • Shout-Out: It's entirely possible that Nick Wilde (fox) and Judy Hopps (rabbit) were a deliberate nod to this film, especially given the film's notoriety over racial content. The only film that could have gotten away with a shout out would be one that ran with the themes that Zootopia explored. However, in Song of the South the fox is much more quick tempered and underestimates the rabbit's intelligence.
  • Tear Jerker: Several...
    • When Uncle Remus tells Johnny about the dog, who one could only assume was drowned, though at the end when the animated characters show up in the real world, the puppy is shown to be just fine, averting What Happened to the Mouse?.
    • When Johnny runs to Uncle Remus's cabin only to find that he's gone.
    • Seeing Johnny in bed.
  • Toy Ship: Johnny and Ginny.
  • Values Dissonance: The reason this film isn't shown in America anymore. In addition to racial issues, no-one seems to care in particular that two children want to drown a puppy for fun.

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/YMMV/SongOfTheSouth