History YMMV / SongOfTheSouth

23rd Aug '17 8:14:31 PM NWolfman
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* SoOkayItsAverage: While the racial politics surrounding the movie are obviously the biggest reason Disney's tried to bury it, the other, arguably just as big reason is that the people who ''have'' seen it feel that it's an otherwise boring movie with little merit beyond the animation and finding out whether or not it's as racist as its reputation says it is.

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* SoOkayItsAverage: While the racial politics surrounding the movie are obviously the biggest reason Disney's tried to bury it, the other, arguably just as big reason is that the people who ''have'' seen it feel that it's an otherwise boring movie with little merit beyond the animation and finding out whether or not it's as racist as its reputation says it is.animation.
19th Aug '17 8:36:09 PM PrincessGwen
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* SoOkayItsAverage: While the racial politics surrounding the movie are obviously the biggest reason Disney's tried to bury it, the other, arguably just as big reason reason is that the people who ''have'' seen it feel that it's an otherwise boring movie with little merit beyond the animation and finding out whether or not it's as racist as it's reputation says it is.

to:

* SoOkayItsAverage: While the racial politics surrounding the movie are obviously the biggest reason Disney's tried to bury it, the other, arguably just as big reason reason is that the people who ''have'' seen it feel that it's an otherwise boring movie with little merit beyond the animation and finding out whether or not it's as racist as it's its reputation says it is.
19th Aug '17 8:15:56 PM NWolfman
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Added DiffLines:

* SoOkayItsAverage: While the racial politics surrounding the movie are obviously the biggest reason Disney's tried to bury it, the other, arguably just as big reason reason is that the people who ''have'' seen it feel that it's an otherwise boring movie with little merit beyond the animation and finding out whether or not it's as racist as it's reputation says it is.
7th Jun '17 5:43:23 PM DeisTheAlcano
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* BileFascination: Subverted in that the film isn't considered to be poorly made as much as it's story's subject are of highly questionable morals, and modern viewers only seem interested in watching it to see if it is, in fact, as racist as they've been told it is.

to:

* BileFascination: Subverted in that the film isn't considered to be poorly made as much as it's its story's subject subjects are of highly questionable morals, and modern viewers only seem interested in watching it to see if it is, in fact, as racist as they've been told it is.
7th Jun '17 4:51:41 PM NWolfman
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Added DiffLines:

* BileFascination: Subverted in that the film isn't considered to be poorly made as much as it's story's subject are of highly questionable morals, and modern viewers only seem interested in watching it to see if it is, in fact, as racist as they've been told it is.
24th May '17 9:32:41 AM youfeelingluckypunk27
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* FairForItsDay: And arguably not only fair, but brave. You could say that Uncle Remus was a sharecropper, which was
not too far removed from a slave (the South had a way of cutting corners after they lost the Civil War and sharecropping was one of the rare jobs freed slaves could get after the South was strapped for resources), and he was complacent and even positive about his current position. However, he's more mature than the white folks he works for. This applied to the cast as well. Walt Disney absolutely ''loved'' how well James Baskett played the part of Uncle Remus. Originally, the actor was only going to voice an animated animal until Disney gave him the lead. To top it off, Disney put a lot of effort into seeing that Baskett got an honorary [[UsefulNotes/AcademyAward Oscar]] for his performance, making him the first African American man to get any sort of Oscar[[note]] His co-star Hattie [=McDaniel=] (Aunt Tempe) was, of course, the first African American ''woman'' to win an UsefulNotes/AcademyAward, for Best Supporting Actress for the part of "Mammy" in 1939's ''GoneWithTheWind''[[/note]]. However, when the film premiered in Atlanta, he still wasn't allowed to attend, on account of racial segregation.

to:

* FairForItsDay: And arguably not only fair, but brave. You could say that Uncle Remus was a sharecropper, which was
was not too far removed from a slave (the South had a way of cutting corners after they lost the Civil War and sharecropping was one of the rare jobs freed slaves could get after the South was strapped for resources), and he was complacent and even positive about his current position. However, he's more mature than the white folks he works for. This applied to the cast as well. Walt Disney absolutely ''loved'' how well James Baskett played the part of Uncle Remus. Originally, the actor was only going to voice an animated animal until Disney gave him the lead. To top it off, Disney put a lot of effort into seeing that Baskett got an honorary [[UsefulNotes/AcademyAward Oscar]] for his performance, making him the first African American man to get any sort of Oscar[[note]] His co-star Hattie [=McDaniel=] (Aunt Tempe) was, of course, the first African American ''woman'' to win an UsefulNotes/AcademyAward, for Best Supporting Actress for the part of "Mammy" in 1939's ''GoneWithTheWind''[[/note]]. However, when the film premiered in Atlanta, he still wasn't allowed to attend, on account of racial segregation.
24th May '17 9:32:13 AM youfeelingluckypunk27
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* FairForItsDay: And arguably not only fair, but brave. This applied to the cast as well. Walt Disney absolutely ''loved'' how well James Baskett played the part of Uncle Remus. Originally, the actor was only going to voice an animated animal until Disney gave him the lead. To top it off, Disney put a lot of effort into seeing that Baskett got an honorary [[UsefulNotes/AcademyAward Oscar]] for his performance, making him the first African American man to get any sort of Oscar[[note]] His co-star Hattie [=McDaniel=] (Aunt Tempe) was, of course, the first African American ''woman'' to win an UsefulNotes/AcademyAward, for Best Supporting Actress for the part of "Mammy" in 1939's ''GoneWithTheWind''[[/note]]. However, when the film premiered in Atlanta, he still wasn't allowed to attend, on account of racial segregation.

to:

* FairForItsDay: And arguably not only fair, but brave. You could say that Uncle Remus was a sharecropper, which was
not too far removed from a slave (the South had a way of cutting corners after they lost the Civil War and sharecropping was one of the rare jobs freed slaves could get after the South was strapped for resources), and he was complacent and even positive about his current position. However, he's more mature than the white folks he works for.
This applied to the cast as well. Walt Disney absolutely ''loved'' how well James Baskett played the part of Uncle Remus. Originally, the actor was only going to voice an animated animal until Disney gave him the lead. To top it off, Disney put a lot of effort into seeing that Baskett got an honorary [[UsefulNotes/AcademyAward Oscar]] for his performance, making him the first African American man to get any sort of Oscar[[note]] His co-star Hattie [=McDaniel=] (Aunt Tempe) was, of course, the first African American ''woman'' to win an UsefulNotes/AcademyAward, for Best Supporting Actress for the part of "Mammy" in 1939's ''GoneWithTheWind''[[/note]]. However, when the film premiered in Atlanta, he still wasn't allowed to attend, on account of racial segregation.
3rd May '17 7:12:37 AM Julia1984
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* IdiotPlot: A lot of trouble would’ve been saved had anyone bothered telling Ginny’s brothers that the puppy’s not theirs, so they have no right to drown it (putting aside just how horrifying it is that two children are so [[CardCarryingVillain cartoonishly evil]] that they want to ''drown a puppy''), or told Johnny’s mother that he got the puppy fair and square and ''why'' he got it in the first place.

to:

* IdiotPlot: A lot of trouble would’ve been saved had anyone bothered telling Ginny’s brothers that the puppy’s not theirs, so they have no right to drown it (putting aside just how horrifying it is that two children are so [[CardCarryingVillain cartoonishly evil]] that they want to ''drown a puppy''), or told Johnny’s mother that he got the puppy fair and square and ''why'' he got it in the first place.
12th Mar '17 8:19:10 AM Aquillion
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* JustHereForGodzilla: Many people who watch the film watch it just for the animated segments with Br'er Rabbit.

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* JustHereForGodzilla: JustHereForGodzilla:
**
Many people who watch the film watch it just for the animated segments with Br'er Rabbit.Rabbit.
** Nowadays, many viewers are just watching it to see what all the racial ValuesDissonance is about.
1st Feb '17 11:31:48 AM dsneybuf
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* ChorusOnlySong: [[EarWorm Zip A-Dee Doo-Dah, zip a-dee ay]]... this has even applied to the ride.



* ShoutOut: It's entirely possible that [[{{Disney/Zootopia}} Nick Wilde (fox) and Judy Hopps (rabbit)]] were a deliberate nod to this film, especially given the film's notoriety over racial content. The only film that ''could'' have gotten away with a shout out would be one that ran with the themes that ''{{Disney/Zootopia}}'' explored. However, in ''Song of the South'' the fox is much more quick tempered and underestimates the rabbit's intelligence.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=YMMV.SongOfTheSouth