YMMV / Moby


  • Anvilicious: Moby's always been unafraid to push his vegan agenda, from his music to his liner notes to his social media presence. The liner notes to Play amount to lecturing the reader to take up Moby's life choices - especially veganism. The last page is nothing but quotes that excoriate the reader for even considering eating animal products. The music's good, the liner notes are terrible. If it's any help, Moby admits in the notes that they don't have anything to do with the music.
  • Archive Panic: Let's dive right in. He's been recording under the Moby name since the beginning of The '90s, and has amassed sixteen albums, with various singles from each album (and non-album singles) adding up to countless remixes and b-sides. Then he's recorded a few more albums under the name Voodoo Child, and then there's all the compilations of his work, and the deluxe editions of some of his records (some of which add a second disc of his ambient material). There's no shortage of material for this guy.
  • Critical Dissonance: 18 was considered a retread of Play, and Hotel was considered uninspired (to which Moby actually agreed). Both albums sold in the millions anyway.
  • Ear Worm:
    • "South Side," "Natural Blues" and "Dream About Me."
    • "Extreme Ways". OH BABY! OH BABY! THEN IT FELL APART! IT FELL APART!
  • Ending Fatigue: The 10-minute "Face It" from Animal Rights. Moby once said on his blog that it was his favorite song that he's ever recorded.
  • Fanon Discontinuity: Depending on who you talk to, Hotel may or may not exist, and if it does usually it's just one of the two discs that exist. The majority of the Moby fanbase tends to agree that Animal Rights never happened, though. Moby had this to say on Animal Rights' reception: "I got one piece of fan mail from Terence Trent D'Arby and I got a phone call from Axl Rose saying he was listening to Animal Rights on repeat. Bono told me he loved Animal Rights. So if you're gonna have three pieces of fan mail, that's the fan mail to get." Suffice to say, some people love that album, and Moby has since come to grips with its bad reputation, calling it "sort of a hidden record."
  • Growing the Beard: Everything Is Wrong was the first record where Moby really expanded his musical palette beyond his 90s rave music. Play mostly dropped the heavy techno and grew the beard even longer.
  • It's the Same, Now It Sucks: Critical reaction to 18. It went to #1 in numerous countries anyway.
  • Most Wonderful Sound: Moby's duet with Gwen Stefani on "South Side." Especially the chorus; let's just say Gwen was a great choice.
    • Moby's voice is also surprisingly good on here as well. He's not technically a bad vocalist. He's just unaware that he's mostly a bass/baritone (vocal part) and it's when he wails in the tenor range and is clearly straining that he sounds frail.
  • Narm: The reaction Moby inspired in the 90s when he tried to make heavy rock music.
  • Never Live It Down: To Eminem fans, he's just the "nobody listens to techno" guy. Even Eminem himself eventually pulled a mea culpa on that one. Moby eventually just made it into a t-shirt.
  • Newbie Boom: The new generation of fans that slowly made Play into a sleeper hit.
  • Popular with Furries: The music video for "Beautiful", which depicts a swingers' party for people in animal costumes that goes horribly wrong.
  • Rescued from the Scrappy Heap: Play did exactly that for Moby.
  • Sampled Up:
    • Do you like Alan Lomax blues recordings? You're in luck. He samples the hell out of these.
    • One "sample" isn't even a sample at all, but is instead a full remix. In 1937, a singer named Vera Hallnote  recorded a song called "Trouble So Hard", which Moby remixed and retitled "Natural Blues" for his aforementioned Play album.
  • Signature Song: A few candidates for this one. If you're talking 90s rave-era Moby, then it's unmistakably "Go". After he radically shifted his career around the Turn of the Millennium, it's probably "Porcelain" or "Natural Blues".
  • Sweet Dreams Fuel: Where to begin?
    • "The Rain Falls And The Sky Shudders." It's little more than six minutes of piano mixed with rain sounds, and it's actually more relaxing than it sounds.
    • So much stuff from Play fits here.
    • "Novio," the intro to I Like To Score. More beautiful piano, plus a sample of a choir singing in Latin. It's powerful stuff.
    • The title track from 18 is so pretty and soothing, it was the intro to his live shows for a while.
    • The ambient second disc from Hotel was so much this trope that it got a standalone release in 2014.
    • "Memory Gospel", one of the Play B-sides. It's a soft track led by an enthralling ambient lead, light percussion, and female singing. Made even more powerful when it was put as background music to Martin Luther King, Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech.
  • Tough Act to Follow: Play is definitely this.
  • True Art Is Angsty: Attempted on Animal Rights. Needless to say, Moby is not that guy.
  • Vindicated by History: Minor example. Animal Rights has gotten warmer reception over the years, particularly with heavy music fans and listeners able to separate it from his more typical discography. That being said, it's still seen as a weaker effort, though not the utter disaster it was in 1997.

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