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YMMV: All-Star Superman

For both:

  • Angst? What Angst?: Superman, upon learning that he's dying, merely proceeds to quietly put his affairs in order.
    • The same applies to Lex concerning his imminent execution. Though in his case, it's possible his escape was already planned.
  • Fridge Brilliance: Silver Age Superman probably remembers his dealing with The Incredible Hulk, which is why he replies, "They surrender" to the question, "What happens when the Unstoppable Force Meets Immovable Object." That's precisely what happened in that crossover.
  • Fridge Logic: Something seems odd when Batman (the world's greatest detective) doesn't make a single appearance in this story. Not even for a cameo, or to comfort one of his closest friends (in most continuities at least) as he's dying.
    • The series deliberately doesn't feature anyone from outside the Superman stories note .

For the comic:

  • Alternative Character Interpretation: An Epileptic Tree-ish one about Leo Quintum has become an almost essential part of the story's mythos on the internet after being pitched in an article by Cole Moore Odell. If you've finished the story, check it out.
  • Ensemble Darkhorse: Nastalathia Luthor, despite making only a few appearances.
  • Epileptic Trees: Many believe Leo Quintum is Lex Luthor, having travelled backward in time from after the end of the series where he briefly copied Superman's powers and Went Sane From The Revelation.
  • Hype Backlash: When the introduction to volume two contains a promise that chapter ten proves Superman is cooler than God, well, this sort of hype has lead some fans to hold the story to an unreasonable standard.
  • Magnificent Bastard: Luthor as usual.
  • Magnum Opus: For both Superman, Grant Morrison, Frank Quitely and (see below) quite possibly for Dwayne McDuffie too.
  • Rule of Symbolism: The whole series is 12 issues and in those issues Superman's story is following a sun's path throughout the sky. By the middle of the series he's entering his "winter" phase and we finally see Metropolis at night. In the end of episode 5, Lex's sidekick and niece rows a boat with Clark out of the prison where Lex is. It is heavily based on the Greek conception of the dead being sailed to the underworld on the river Styx by Death.
  • Win BACK The Crowd: In the sense that the story allowed Morrison to use some of the concepts from his aborted Superman 2000 pitch and bring back his DC One Million continuity.

For the film:

  • Adaptation Decay: The film changes Solaris' fate from being captured and reprogrammed to being executed by Superman. It also changes the pacing of the prison riot so that Clark fails to save some convicts from the Parasite. The adaptation also cuts two of the comic's most affecting moments; where Superman gets to say a final goodbye to his father, and the famous scene with the attempted suicide.
  • Awesome Music: Christopher Drake's score.
  • Death by Adaptation: Solaris, The Tyrant Sun.
  • Harsher in Hindsight: As mentioned on the main page, writer Dwayne McDuffie died suddenly of complications from emergency heart surgery the day before the film was released on DVD. Made all the more poignant because the film concerns Superman facing his mortality, and he had been giving interviews about the film mere days before.
  • Magnum Opus: Some fans even consider All-Star Superman to be McDuffie's Swan Song.

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