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Tabletop Game: Ehdrigohr
Ehdrigohr is a Tabletop RPG system and setting designed and published by Allen Turner, a game designer at Chicago's DePaul University. The game is based on Fate Core ruleset and set in a Constructed World mainly inspired by the Native American mythologies. It was funded on Kickstarter in January 2013 and shipped in September.

The game system and setting provide examples of following tropes:

  • Arc Number: Four. It seems that everything of significance in this setting comes in fours or factors thereof.
  • Beary Friendly: Played With. The bear spirits are not hostile to humans but neither do they jump at the chance to mingle with them (unlike the dog and hare spirits)—except with the northern tribes, for whom they've developed a surprising affection.
  • Don't Wake the Sleeper: The Woe have been asleep for a couple of hundred years, thanks to humanity discovering the Rites of Tranquility. However, every 5-7 winters, one of them stirs and attempts to awaken, closely followed by others, so a team of heroes has to be dispatched to each of their resting places to perform the Rites again and make sure they remain asleep.
  • Eldritch Abomination: Whatever lurks beyond the Hoop is enough to drive even a Physical God insane.
  • For the Evulz: The Fiddler Knights roam around spreading sorrow and suffering basically for the kick of it (though the one who gets the kick out of it is mainly their Sorrow master).
  • Functional Magic: Possessed by literally everyone.
  • Great Offscreen War: The War of Sorrows.
  • Grim Up North: The White, a subarctic tundra populated by monsters, bears, and tribes who commune with bears.
  • Layered World: The Traveling Lands (The Road, Shadow, Dream, and the River) are alternate dimensions layered on top (or below?) the material plane, and it is possible to enter them in one material location, travel a bit, and exit back to the real world in a different place.
  • Magical Native American: Pretty much every notable character—everyone in the setting has some magical power, even if they aren't trained in its use.
  • Physical God: The sixteen Songs. The Spinner and the Weaver, as well as WhatMoves, are more akin to a transcendent God, on the other hand, especially the latter.
  • Sealed Evil in a Can: The Twain is the can for an unbelievable amount of various evils. Them managing to keep getting free as the Wheel (the universe) expands into it is the main problem of the setting.
  • Title Drop: "Ehdrigohr" in the setting refers both to the human heartbeat, and to the rhythm of the great Hoop that encompasses the world. It is not a coincidence that they are in unison.
  • A World Half Full: There's a legion of monsters out there in the Twain that will inevitably be freed as a basic accident of existence, the whole world has suffered a devastating war, there are monsters everywhere...and it is an accepted fact, in and out of setting, that the world is recovering.

EarthdawnHorror Tabletop GamesEclipse Phase
Dreamfall ChaptersWebsite/KickstarterErfworld
EarthdawnFantasy Tabletop GamesEon

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