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Recap: Star Trek S 3 E 22 The Savage Curtain
The one with Abraham Lincoln IN SPACE!

Another day on the Enterprise, another new planet to explore. Excalbia will be explored from afar due to excessive amounts of volcanic activity. Kirk checks out Spock's tush and asks if he detects any precious little life forms. He actually detects a few, though there should be none. Oh well, obviously a computer error. Time to pack it in and call it a....is that Abraham Lincoln hovering in space?

He's posed just like his statue in the Lincoln Memorial, armchair and all. Somehow, he can not only exist in space but speak in the vacuum of space. He politely requests to be beamed aboard. Kirk beams him aboard with full presidential honors. He realizes there is no logical way this should be the Great Emancipator himself, but he'll play along anyway. Lincoln, still charmingly polite, requests Kirk to beam down to Excalbia with him. He cannot explain why, only that he must. Bones and Scotty think this is a very dumb idea. So of course Kirk's willing to do it! Spock declares he will go wherever Kirk goes. (Shades of Ruth and Naomi, anyone?) And so they do.

On beaming down, they meet Surak, a Messianic Archetype from Vulcan history who makes Spock look like a Keet. They also meet a Rock Monster called Yarnek who wants to know if Good or Evil is stronger. To find out, he's going to pit these four against Genghis Khan, Zora (a Mad Doctor from Tiburon), Colonel Phillip Green (Eco-terrorist and genocidal maniac from WWIII) and Kahless the Unforgettable. (Hero of the Klingons) Why? Eh, why not?

Tropes for this episode include:

  • Alternate Character Interpretation: The Khaless here is presented as Kirk and Spock would expect him to be. Later, it's revealed that Klingons see him as an honorable warrior who would not stoop to the lowly deceit he uses in this episode.
  • Archived Army: The Hero team is Captain Kirk, Mr. Spock, Abraham Lincoln and Surak of Vulcan. The Villain team is Genghis Khan, the Klingon Kahless, Colonel Green and the Mad Scientist Zora. Everyone except Kirk and Spock are actually alien rock creatures masquerading as humanoids.
  • Artistic License - Biology: The rock monsters are stated to be carbon life forms, where silicone based life would make much more sense. Even more baffling as silicone based life has appeared on the show earlier.
  • Artistic License - History: The historical characters, most notably Lincoln, do not look or act much like their real counterparts. Justified, since they are based on Kirk's and Spock's images of these historic figures.
  • Badass Pacifist: Surak refuses to take part in battle, even though Kirk insists the war they're fighting is for a just cause. Still, Surak insists on a peaceful negotiation with Col. Green. Even Kirk is moved to remark to Spock that "your Surak is a brave man", to which Spock replies "Men of peace usually are, Captain
  • Blatant Lies: Green tells Kirk that he would like to peacefully team up with Kirk against their common foe. It's all a deception to attack him when his guard's down.
  • Blue and Orange Morality: Yarnek does not understand the concept of good and evil, and doesn't seem to learn much from the events of this episode.
  • Broke Your Arm Punching Out Cthulhu: Kirk decides he's going to slug Yarnek for what he put Spock and himself through. Yeah, punch the monster made of lava rocks, Jim. You'll have third degree burns on top of that broken arm!
  • Captain Obvious: Yarnek tells Kirk "If you and Spock survive, you return to your vessel. If you do not... your existence is ended." Thanks for telling us, Yarnek! That's right up there with "People die if they're killed!"
  • Characterization Marches On: Kahless is based on Kirk's conception of the klingon hero, and it is (due to the political climate) both not terribly favorable and comparatively ignorant.
  • Door Jam: Yarnek isn't letting anyone go until they show whether good or evil is stronger.
  • Evil Cannot Comprehend Good: Col. Green expects Surak's peace talks to be a trick. That's what he'd be doing if he tried to talk peace with someone.
  • Famous, Famous, Fictional: Of the six "historical" characters in this episode, only two are known to modern day humans. The others got their characterization expanded on in future Star Trek incarnations, save for Zora. Pity. It would've been interesting to see what a female Josef Mengele of the future would be like.
  • Good vs. Evil: Sums up the whole episode
  • Forced into Their Sunday Best: Bones and Scotty rankle at getting gussied up for someone who is probably not Abraham Lincoln.
  • Good Cannot Comprehend Evil: Surak, Spock and President Lincoln have a hard time understanding the motives and actions of the opposing "evil" side. Only Kirk seems to have a grasp of their potential for deceptiveness and duplicity.
  • Involuntary Battle to the Death: As in in "Arena", "The Savage Curtain" and "Specter of the Gun", Kirk is forced to fight for an alien's amusement.
  • Kirk Summation: Kirk can't punch the Yanek, but he can give him a piece of his mind, demanding "What gives you the right to do this?"
  • Narm: "Help me! Spock!" Possibly deliberately. Spock knows no Vulcan, especially not Surak, would cry out like that.
  • A Nazi by Any Other Name: Colonel Green is Adolf Hitler dressed in Mork from Ork's red jumpsuit.
  • Not So Different: Yarnek insists his method of exploration is no different from Kirk's. That's Blue and Orange Morality in action, folks.
  • Rock Monster: The aliens who set up the morality play involving Good vs. Evil.
  • The Knights Who Say Squee: Kirk and Spock are both pretty honored to meet their personal heroes.
  • Two of Your Earth Minutes: The Excalbian recreation of Abraham Lincoln asks if they still measure time in minutes, to which Kirk responds that they "can convert to it". (Lincoln consults a pocket watch as he says this.)
  • Values Dissonance: Lincoln refers to Uhura as a "charming Negress". He seems to realize right away that his words, well meant as they were are inappropriate and apologizes. Uhura tells him that in the future, people have learned not to fear words. And they shake hands.
  • Voice Changeling: The fake Kahless is able to perfectly mimic the voices of both Surak and Lincoln.
  • We Come in Peace Shoot to Kill: Green pulls this and assumes Surak is doing the same.
  • Would Hit a Girl: Spock has no problem laying his fists on Zora. Wouldn't you slug Ilsa Koch if you got the chance?
Star Trek S 3 E 21 The Cloud MindersRecap/Star Trek: The Original SeriesStar Trek S 3 E 23 All Our Yesterdays

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