Music: Jeff Buckley

"Maybe there's a God above
But all I ever learned from love
Is how to shoot somebody who outdrew ya."

Despite passing away at only 30, Jeff Buckley is fondly remembered as an inspired guitarist and singer/songwriter of the 1990s. His first public exposure was in New York City, singing and playing guitar with the loosely knit supergroup Gods and Monsters. After that he worked in Los Angeles, singing mostly cover songs until he garnered the interest of Columbia Records and created his first and only studio album, Grace, in 1994. Working on that album was Record Producer Andy Wallace, who previously made a name for himself mixing Nirvana's Nevermind.

Buckley spent much of the next two years promoting Grace. Sales of the album were mostly lackluster, and the songs received little play on the radio. Despite that, he was a critical darling and received almost entirely positive reviews. His cover of "Hallelujah" was noted as one of his best efforts, and included in Rolling Stone's list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. Jimmy Page even called Grace his "favorite album of all time", high praise from the man Buckley counted as one of his chief influences.

In early 1997, Buckley moved to Memphis to begin work on his second album, recording 4 track demos at his house in preparation for a recording session with Andy Wallace, while also playing gigs at Barristers', a small club in downtown Memphis underneath a car park. But then tragedy struck. On May 29, 1997, he disappeared while going for an evening swim in Wolf River Harbor, a channel of the Mississippi river; having waded out into the river, fully dressed, while shouting the lyrics to "Whole Lotta Love", he was swept away while a friend was moving their belongings away from the incoming tide. His body wasn't found until June 4. After an autopsy, it was confirmed that Buckley had taken no illegal drugs or alcohol, and his death was entirely accidental.

After his death, it was decided by Buckley's mother to release an incomplete version of Jeff's second album, "My Sweetheart the Drunk". Due to the album's unfinished nature, it was retitled "Sketches For My Sweetheart the Drunk". The album itself is even less known than its predecessor, but among serious fans it has the status of being just as good, if not better, than "Grace". That being said, the album is obviously unfinished, with many songs suffering from poor audio quality and general oddities in terms of songwriting.

In the years since, Buckley's popularity has grown. "Hallelujah" eventually became the number 1 single on iTunes for a time, and several of his demos were released posthumously.

There's also a movie based off of his life in the works right now, with Reeve Carney playing Jeff. It has a tentative title of "Mystery White Boy", a nickname Jeff often went under whilst touring.

His album Grace (1994) now has its own page. His second, posthumous album, Sketches For My Sweetheart The Drunk (1998) now has a page.


Studio and Live Discography:


His work provides examples of

  • Break Up Song: "Last Goodbye", "Forget Her" and "Lover You Should've Come Over"
  • Calling the Old Man Out:
    • "Dream Brother", in a roundabout way. The song itself is warning to a friend who was self-destructing, but Buckley makes reference to his own father (who walked out on Jeff and his mother when she was still pregnant and died of a drug overdose when Jeff was 8). He met him only once and the lyric "don't be like the one who made me so old" is a subtle but clear Take That. During at least one live performance of this song, he adds an additional few lines just before one of the verses, one of which is "you're just like him" several times.
    • "What Will You Say" was mainly written by Jeff's friend Chris Dowd, and Jeff only helped with some parts of the song. Nevertheless, one can imagine that Jeff felt the song hit pretty close to home, regardless of who wrote the words. In some performances, Jeff changed the lyrics from "Father, do you hear me? [...] Do you even care?" to "Did you even care", suggesting that he was addressing his own father, who was dead.
  • Cloud Cuckoolander: One of the defining traits of Buckley's live shows was his tendency to interact with the audience by spoofing his favorite artists. A lot of the interviews conducted with him also feature him going off on tangents. This can be seen in the Live at Sin-é EP.
    Jeff: Boy, I hope I can pull this into some sense now!
    Interviewer: You can do it. Come on, focus!
  • Cover Version: He had quite a few... "Lilac Wine", "Corpus Christi Carol", "Yard of Blonde Girls", "Back in N.Y.C." and "Satisfied Mind", for starters. Not to mention "Hallelujah", which is arguably the song he's most widely known for.
  • Epic Rocking:
    • There exists a 26 minute version of "Kanga Roo" that pretty much plays this to the letter.
    • Also, Buckley's cover of "Back in N.Y.C.", originally written by Genesis.
    • Jeff had a couple of songs with special live remixes called "Chocolate" versions. The most famous of these are "Mojo Pin" and "Kanga Roo". The former can easily be found on YouTube. The latter not so much.
  • Everything Sounds Sexier in French: Jeff's cover of "Je N'en Connais Pas La Fin", originally written by Édith Piaf.
  • Grief Song:
    • "Hallelujah", "Forget Her", "Opened Once" and "Lover, You Should Have Come Over." "What Will You Say", may also count, as the lyrics must surely have made Jeff think of the relationship he never got to have with his father. Jeff admitted in an interview that he had great admiration for Tim as a musician, despite what he thought of his parenting skills.
    • Many of his songs of of "Sketches", with "I Know We Could Be So Happy Baby (If We Wanted To Be)" particularly standing out.
    • "Forget Her", which Buckley wrote after breaking up with his girlfriend. As a result, the song brought up such painful memories that he refused to include it on his first album (It was eventually released on the Legacy Edition of "Grace", however).
  • Incredibly Long Note: One note in "Hallelujah" lasts 23 seconds.
  • Intercourse with You: Not often, but "Your Flesh is So Nice" absolutely reeks of this. It's about two lesbians having sex (with Jeff being one of them somehow).
  • Long Title: "Lover You Should've Come Over", "I Know We Could Be So Happy Baby (If We Wanted to Be)"
    • Officially unreleased classic "All Flowers In Time Bend Towards The Sun"