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Shameful Source Of Knowledge
A character is reluctant to give out a particular bit of information (no matter how important) because the way they acquired that knowledge is an Old Shame, revealing of their criminal lifestyle or otherwise distateful.

See also Or So I Heard, I Read It for the Articles and Morton's Fork. Compare Unbelievable Source Plot, where they want to share their knowledge but can't; Closet Geek, where the social stigma of having nerdy interests is shameful; and I Never Said It Was Poison, where a character accidentally implicates themselves in a crime by revealing too much information.

Examples

Fan Works
  • A Judge Dee Fan Sequel where the judge is looking for the head of a vast conspiracy to send troublemakers and criminals to an out-of-the-way town has a shopkeeper report Tao Gan's shoplifting to the local judge. This turns out to be a mistake, since Dee deduces that if the shopkeeper caught Tao (a very good thief), he must be a professional himself. And if he can go and report it without caring that this automatically marks him as a criminal as well, then there is a very good chance the man he's looking for is in the town. He's right.

Film
  • The Sting. Doyle Lonnegan tries to cheat Henry Gondorff with a stacked deck during a poker game, but Gondorff outsmarts him by switching out the cards he was given for better ones.
    Floyd: We can't let him get away with that.
    Lonnegan: What was I supposed to do? Call him for cheating better than me in front of the others?

Literature
  • Played for Laughs in Animorphs where Rachel offhandedly mentions what kind of volcano they're looking at. After some questioning as to why she knows, she defensively tells them it was on the The Magic School Bus. Gets a Call Back later on when nobody questions a piece of information, since they'd all seen the The Magic School Bus on that subject as well.
  • Played for Drama in Judge Dee. The judge is facing a crime that he cannot prove (examinations of the body show no poison and no wounds), so a young woman tells him offhandedly about wives married to abusive husbands, sitting in their rooms repairing their shoes with a hammer and tiny nails, and how easy it is to drive the nail into the skull of a sleeping man... The judge has the body reexamined, finds the nail, and has the victim's wife arrested. The young woman who told him commits suicide to prevent the judge agonizing between his conscience and his duty (she admitted to murdering her husband in front of him, but had every reason to).
  • Miriam Allen deFord's short story "Walking Alone". A man calls into work and lies, saying he can't come in that day due to his bad back. He then goes out to the country for a walk. While there he sees a young girl being kidnapped. He decides not to call the police about it since his boss would find out about his lie and fire him. The girl's body is found and a man is accused of the murder. The protagonist knows that it's the wrong man since he saw the real one, but he still doesn't come forward. The falsely accused man is tried, convicted and executed for the crime, and the protagonist goes mad with guilt.
  • In PartnerShip, the five Royal Brats that Nancia ferried to their remote postings in the Nyota system are all planning to use their positions for various kinds of corrupt practices (they even have a bet going; the one who makes the most shady money in five years gets a cut of the others' operations). However, Nancia can't tell anyone about it because she got the information by refusing to introduce herself and letting them think they were aboard a mindless drone, which is considered tantamount to spying.
  • In O. Henry's story "A Retrieved Reformation", a reformed safecracker who had settled down under a new identity uses his old skills in order to save a child trapped in a safe.

Live-Action TV
  • Several episodes of Midsomer Murders have characters not reveal information that could have prevented someone's death, as this would also force them to reveal that they're cheating on their spouse or involved in shady deals with other inhabitants of Midsomer.
  • In the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine episode "Dax", the Dax symbiote in Jadzia Dax's body is placed on trial for the crimes of treason and the murder of General Ardelon Tandro by the man's son. One of the symbiote's previous hosts, Curzon Dax, is the only person who could have committed the crime but didn't have a suitable alibi. General Tandro's widow Enina is incredibly reluctant to involve herself in the trial, but eventually provides Dax with an alibi - she was having an affair with Curzon Dax, and he was in her bed at the time when the crime took place.
  • M*A*S*H. In "Tea and Empathy", a passing soldier confesses to Father Mulcahy that he was involved with the Black Market, and reveals that stolen penicillin is kept under an old bell at a burn-out school house. As it turns out, the 4077th is having a dire penicillin shortage and can't obtain any new supply, leaving Mulcahy conflicted about what he should do about what he knows about the whereabouts of some penicillin.
  • Inverted on an episode of CSI Crime Scene Investigation which is set over the course of a year. A junkie who Nick helps out at the beginning (and slowly sorts himself out over the course of the episode) recognises the smell of some drugs the murderer poisoned the victim with. However, he isn't willing to reveal what he knows until after he's gone clean, since he didn't think he'd be believed.
  • Saturday Night Live: From a Weekend Update segment on January 25, 2014:
    An 18 year old high school student in Florida, who was suspended after school officials learned that he was starring in adult films, has been allowed to return to classes. School officials are also stressing that the way they found out the student was starring in adult films "is not important."

Music
  • The Garth Brooks song "The Night Will Only Know" is about a couple cheating on their respective spouses who witness a murder at a Make-Out Point and can't tell due to revealing their affair.
  • "Long Black Veil": the Wrongly Accused person's only alibi is adultery, so neither he nor she tells the court about it.

Tabletop Games
  • In the dark humor RPG Paranoia you are tasked with rooting out the commie mutant traitors within Alpha Complex. The thing is, you are a commie mutant traitor yourself (as is everyone else). Naturally, knowing anything about traitorous activities, even what they are, makes you a prime suspect for being a traitor.
  • The RPG version of Legend of the Five Rings includes several skills that are classified as "Low Skills" such as Forgery, Sleight of Hand, and Temptation, which if you ever exhibit or imply knowledge of, will lead to dishonor. There are, however, exceptions (for example, if you're among the Crab Clan, Shadowlands Lore is not considered dishonorable to know - because only an idiot wouldn't study the Shadowlands when you live on their goddamn border).

Videogames
  • A major plot point in The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim's College of Winterhold questline is the need to recover the Staff of Magnus. Although he won't tell you directly, it turns out the College's Arch-Mage, Savos Aren, knows exactly where the staff is - he once led an expedition into the dungeon of Labyrinthian trying to find it, which led to four of his friends being killed and him being forced to lock two of them in to prevent the dungeon's inhabitant, a Dragon Priest named Morokei, from escaping.

Web Comics
  • The Order of the Stick'': Vaarsuvius learned how to defeat Laurin while bound and gagged in hell. S/He was in hell because s/he "rented" his/her soul to three fiends.

Western Animation
  • One episode of The Simpsons has Bart playing truant from school and sneaking into a party for Mayor Quimby's Jerk Ass nephew Freddy, during which Bart witnesses one of the waiters having a string of incredibly clumsy accidents, and Freddy is arrested after being accused of beating the waiter up. Bart is then faced with a moral dilemma between letting an innocent man go to jail and testifying on his behalf, giving the school proof that he skipped school.


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