Prophecy Armor

Sometimes Death is a huge stickler for the rules, and thus won't take you until it's your specific time to die, on the hour, on the minute, in the exact manner you're prophesied to end. So until you meet that "not of woman borne", you might as well be functionally immortal because nothing in your way is destined to kill you... yet.

In some sense, this trope can serve as an in-universe version of Plot Armor. May involve a visit from Death stating that It Is Not Your Time.

Compare Purpose-Driven Immortality, when someone is given an extended lifespan in order to accomplish a particular task. Also compare Foregone Conclusion and Saved by Canon.


Examples:

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     Anime and Manga  
  • Enforced in Fullmetal Alchemist. The homunculi seeking to use Edward and Al as human sacrifices have to keep the boys alive until "The Promised Day", so they frequently end up pulling Villainous Rescues to ensure their prey stays alive. When the two brothers learn this, they start exploiting it, engaging the homunculi in battle fearlessly and at one point putting themselves in danger to bait their watchers out into the open.
  • If a person's name is written on Death Note and a specific date for the death and the method of death are noted, said person will not die before that date.

     Comic Books  
  • Averted in The Sculptor. David Smith is given artistic superpowers by Death in exchange for living for only 200 more days. However, he is fully capable of being killed before his deadline, so as Death warns him: "No crimefighting!"

     Fan Fiction  
  • In the Homestuck fanfic The Game, and Those Who Play, the Thief of Doom can 'steal' a person's doom, in the form of taking a small black coin from from them. Until they give them the coin back the person can't be killed; when it's returned, the person immediately dies from whatever it was that was destined to kill them.

     Literature  
  • In the Animorphs book Megamorphs #3, the kids are given the power to follow the Villain of the Week through time while retaining their memories despite any changes to history. The power comes from the two opposing forces The Ellimist and Crayak, so the price for the two of them cooperating is Crayak demanding one of the kids must die. Ellimist twists this into "only one of them may die", causing the other Animorphs to become immortal after Jake is killed, healing from bullet wounds, surviving ship explosions, etc. Eventually they rewrite the time stream where the book's events never happened, nullifying the villain's threat and causing Jake to have never died.
  • In the The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy book series, thanks to an encounter with a murderous time-traveling enemy, Arthur Dent is left with the impression that he can't die until he's visited a planet called Stavromulos Beta, where he will encounter the said enemy in his future but the other guy's past. It actually turns out to be a nightclub called Stavro Mueller's Beta, but it's about right.
  • In the world of the Sulien novels, it's possible to curse a person to die if they ever break a particular condition; a person thus cursed will never die any other way than by the curse. It's mentioned that people have occasionally tried to come up with creative conditions that will make themselves or a loved one effectively immortal, and it always backfires horribly.
  • The Big Bad of The Balanced Sword, who is The Chessmaster and practically immortal, has a recurring prophetic dream in which he is hunted down by the one person capable of defeating him, though he can never remember anything about the person when he wakes except their eyes. He considers that he has nothing to fear from anyone until he meets somebody with those eyes. When it's pointed out that Kyri has gray eyes, he says that he doesn't believe it's her because she has the eyes of someone seeking vengeance for a recent wrong, not the controlled determination of the eyes in the dream. During the climactic battle at the end of Phoenix Ascendant, he looks into Kyri's eyes as they fight and her eyes still aren't the eyes from the dream, but they're a lot closer than he was expecting. He escapes with his life, but the implication is that one day they'll meet again.
  • Harriet the Invincible by Ursula Vernon is about a fairytale princess who gets cursed Sleeping Beauty-style, but unlike Sleeping Beauty her parents tell her about the curse when they figure she's old enough to understand. Upon realizing that she's effectively invulnerable until the birthday in question, Harriet decides to take advantage of it by going out and having adventures.
  • Wizards and witches know when they're going to die on the Discworld, though wizards are forever trying to cheat death through various means, none of them successful in the end. Witches tend to use the time to make sure their cottage isn't messy and tidy up the place for their replacement.
  • The Saga of Arrow-Odd: As a teenager growing up in Berurjod in Norway, Odd receives the prophecy that he will die in Berurjod, killed by the horse Faxi. Odd kills Faxi and leaves Berurjod to become a viking, intending never to return. He survives countless battles unscathed and lives to the age of three-hundred until he gets homesick and resolves to visit Berurjod, where he is bitten by a viper nesting in the skull of Faxi, and dies.
  • The Long Ships: The eleven sons of Sone who join Orm's voyage to Russia receive a prophecy from their father that only seven of them will return to him. When four of them have died, the remaining brothers start to behave with utmost recklessness in combat, because, having absolute trust in their father's clairvoyance, they believe they cannot be killed as long as they do not return home. Even though they are somewhat dismayed by the realization that they still can be wounded, when Orm returns to Scania they decide to stay with Orm and do some more adventuring instead of going home, because in that case their lives would be no longer protected by the prophecy.
  • The Heroes: Whirrun of Bligh thinks that Armor Is Useless, because witch Shoglig told him "the time, and the place, and the manner" of his death, "and it is not now". She "was talking shit", as he later realised. With a spear in his back.
     Live-Action Film  
  • In Big Fish, the hero Edward claims that he learned how he would die via a vision in a witch's eye. One of his tall tales has him being attacked by carnivorous trees. But just before they kill him, Edward remembers out loud that this isn't how he dies, causing all the trees to back off.
  • Played with in a very cruel fashion on the Final Destination series: Death wants you dead, and Its cruel game which includes giving some people visions about disasters so they can get away and It can keep on hunting them down is played by Its rules. This includes deciding to take your own life to try to appease Death: Death just won't let you die until It feels like taking you.

     Live-Action 
  • This is downplayed in The Librarians. Prophecies always come true unless someone outside the prediction intervenes or they're contradicted by a prophecy of greater consequence. Otherwise they become self-fulfilling. Outside of those two circumstances whatever is foreseen in a prophecy will survive until that prophecy comes true. This is exploited in the episode this information is introduced by using a coin foreseen to be donated to a museum being used as a surefire way to detect a safe path through a booby trapped hallway.

     Myths and Legends  
  • Ilya Murmomets, the most famous hero of Russian Mythology and Tales, had his future foretold to him and learned that he "will not fall in battle". With that, he went on to face the deadliest enemies in combat and always prevailed.
  • While the Gods of Norse Mythology can - and will - die, it can only happen at Ragnarok under the circumstances foretold (e.g. Thor will die after killing the Midgard Serpent, from breathing in too much of its venom).

     Tabletop Games  
  • The Chosen playbook in Monster of the Week has a special ability that prevents them from dying until their Destiny is fulfilled—any event that would normally kill them is automatically negated with their Luck points.
  • An old Warhammer Fantasy campaign named "The Tragedy of McDeath" (guess what it's based on), where the titular Laird McDeath is prophecied not to die to any man of woman born (and graciously explains this to any challengers). This being Warhammer, however, his castle is under attack not only by human armies (including the bastard daughter of a noble who's looking for the papers to prove her birthright) but dwarves and treemen as well.
  • GURPS 3rd Edition supplement Compendium I. The Destiny advantage causes the character to have a specific future fate. In most cases the character cannot die before achieving their destiny, because premature death would prevent their destiny from occurring.

     Theatre  
  • Macbeth: At his second meeting with the three witches, Macbeth receives the prophecy that "none of woman born shall harm Macbeth". In the final battle, even though the odds seem to stand greatly against him, Macbeth takes courage from the fact that he still cannot be defeated by anyone "born of woman", and warns his opponents to attack him because (he thinks) he is unkillable. This assumption proves to be wrong with Macduff, who was delivered by Caesarean section.
    Let fall thy blade on vulnerable crests:
    I bear a charmed life, which must not yield
    To one of woman born.

     Video Games  
  • Dawn of War: Dark Crusade has Farseer Taldeer responds to Captain Thule's taunts by telling him she already knows when she's going to die, so his threats fall a little flat (however, this is in the non-canon mission where the Eldar beat the Blood Ravens). In canon, she's captured by the Blood Ravens, "interrogated" by chapter master/chief librarian Kyras, and killed at some point within their custody, with Kyras keeping her spirit stone.

     Web Original  
  • SCP Foundation: SCP-711 ("Paradoxical Insurance Policy"). SCP-711 is a device capable of receiving transmissions from the future. It has received one such transmission from a future Foundation agent, but the governing O5 Council has ordered that the transmission never be sent. Since the Foundation knows the message will be sent at some point in the future, as long as it hasn't been sent then the Foundation can't be completely destroyed, because that would leave no one to send the message.
  • The Fear Mythos: Spacefuture Blogger in Omega's Bizarre Adventure was told he by the Vision that he will by killed by giant spiders. Omega figured out that this meant he could use Spacefuture Blogger as a highly effective meatshield .

     Western Animation  
  • Played on one episode of My Life as a Teenage Robot, Brad ends up being scared of dying because of some frightening factoids that he overheard (to the point that he spends all of his time locked inside of his room), so Jenny shows him his future with her mother's Future-Scope, showing that Brad will live to see old age. Thus armed with this knowledge, Brad becomes a hard-core daredevil, and Jenny has to race to keep him safe because not only the visions of the Future-Scope aren't 100% reliable, but the vision didn't showcased whether or not Brad would make it to old age in one piece.

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