Conceive and Kill

Referring to the trope of the female becoming pregnant and then killing her mate, often in the act of copulation. A sub-trope that is part of various tropes, including the Black Widow, Out With a Bang and possibly Someone to Remember Him By tropes.

May be, sometimes, in part or in whole, a metaphor for the fear that Men Are the Expendable Gender, because in many countries they are at a legal and social disadvantage against the mother in matters concerning their children.

For obvious reasons (outside of a Mr. Seahorse situation) this trope is Always Female.


Examples:

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    Anime And Manga 
  • This was Diva's Moral Event Horizon in Blood+, involving raping Saya's younger brother Riku for the purpose of bearing his kid and then murdering him.
  • An extremely unusual Bizarre Alien Reproduction version of this appears in the manga version of Level E; male Conwellians eat their females as part of the breeding process, as the digestive juices are what stimulate the eggs to be fertilised and eventually hatch. They actually destroyed their own planet fighting over whether or not they should genetically alter their species to remove this trait.

    Ballet 
  • Happens in Jerome Robbins' ballet The Cage.

    Comic Books 
  • This appears in one Wonder Woman comic.
  • It also appears in a The Incredible Hercules comic (the story told from #121-125). Amadeus Cho has an interest in Delphyne Gorgon, but she tells him that killing after mating is the custom of the women of her race.
  • Sort of appears with The Darkness, a magic power that is passed from father to son (the son gaining the power when he reaches), but the father dies upon conception: - could be argued to be part of this trope if she copulates with him fully cognizant of this.
  • Occurs with Jim Book in American Vampire. He becomes infected with a disease that will turn him into a vampire, so he persuades Abilena to shoot him. She agrees on the condition he impregnates her first.

    Fan Works 

    Literature 
  • Occurs with the Re'em, a mythological biblical creature claimed to be associated with the Bible. According to the myth, there are only two Re'em in the world at one time. They meet every 70 years for mating. After conception, the female Re'em kills her partner with a single bite.
  • Sort of appears in Hans Staden's Wahre Geschichte (Book II: 29, 1974, p. 179). The man to be sacrificed is given a native woman until the sacrifice comes and the above reference says that if the native woman has a child by him, the child is raised until the age of sacrifice is reached, though the native partner isn't the sole perpetrator; rather, she is one of a crowd. This story is loosely revisited in the 1971 Brazilian film "How tasty was my little Frenchman", portraying the tupinambás tribe.
  • Occurs with the H'nemthe, characters from Star Wars, who believe that a male killed after mating in this way would receive the ultimate spiritual reward by going on to the netherworld as spiritual guardian for his offspring, meaning that they didn't resist the certain death that would result from copulation. Felitipern Trevagg is an example of a male character who was part of this ritual.

    Live Action TV 
  • The Spinnetods from Grimm do this on account of their rapid aging, meaning that they have to become pregnant quickly so that the lineage doesn't die out.
  • On Forever Knight, it was said that for a vampire woman to conceive, she must have sex with a human male - and said male must die during the sex act.
  • The Taresians of Star Trek: Voyager are a One-Gender Race of females that mate with other humanoid species by implanting viruses in them that turn them into male Taresians, believing that there are long-lost children driver with the desire to return home. The mating process (a male is given three females as his wives) is deadly to the male, as they end up dying after mating with her wives.
  • Buffy the Vampire Slayer: The Monster of the Week in "Teacher's Pet" is a She-Mantis which preys on male virgins: mating with them to fertilise her eggs and then killing them.

    Nature 

    Tabletop Games 
  • Many of the female One-Gender Race monsters in Pathfinder do this, especially if they can be considered Cute Monster Girls, in order to warrant their Always Chaotic Evil label.
    • Harpies do this due to their messed up culture, which proclaims that unless a male can prove sufficiently powerful that it would be a waste to kill him after just one clutch, it's an act of shameful weakness for a harpy not to kill and eat the father of her daughters.
    • Jorogumos have a parasitic reproductive methodology, where after they conceive, they paralyze the father with venom and cocoon him, laying their eggs in his flesh so the hatchlings can have his body as their nourishment once they hatch.
  • In Dungeons & Dragons, and derivatives like Pathfinder above, Hags often murder their lovers when they are done, unless they think it would be more fun to leave him alive afterwards.
    • Harpies doing this has also been mentioned in some editions of D&D.
  • In Ravenloft, Red Widows have the same reproductive methods as Pathfinder's Jorogumo.

    Theatre 

    Western Animation 
  • Kung Fu Panda 2: Master Mantis says he never had Daddy issues because his mother bit his father's head. He also claims to be looking forward to the day he has a similar demise.