Expy / Comic Books

  • Jessica Jones from Alias is an admitted expy of Jessica Drew. Alias was initially supposed to star Drew (hence the reason both characters are washed up former superheroes who become private detectives), but Bendis decided he'd rather use an all-new character so he could create her backstory, personality, etc. without worrying about contradicting what had gone before.
  • Calendar Man is used in a similar way to Hannibal Lecter, especially with Batman and Gordon going to him for help on the Holiday murders in The Long Halloween as Clarice Starling did with Hannibal on the case Buffalo Bill case in The Silence of the Lambs.
  • For one in the same property, Julia Lopez is one for Batman: The Animated Series Canon Immigrant Renee Montoya, including being an honest cop Gordon trusts, though it's implied she'd have a higher rank as the story implied she'll replace O'Hara as chief.
  • During the Golden Age, Green Arrow was given many similarities to Batman, right down to the Arrow-Car, Arrow-Cave, and a teen sidekick in Speedy (who is really just like Robin only a junky).
  • The Invisibles:
    • Ragged Robin is similar to Crazy Jane from Grant Morrison's Crazy Jane from his run on Doom Patrol. According to Morrison himself, they're the same person in a different universe. More of this on The Other Wiki. Alhough Ragged Robin does diverge from Crazy Jane and he invented a completely new Backstory for her.
    • King Mob's imaginary (probably) alter ego Gideon Stargrave is a blatant Expy of Michael Moorcock's protagonist Jerry Cornelius. Right down to the narrative caption boxes mimicking the typical chapter titles and prose styles of the Cornelius stories. It later turns out that the Cornelius stories exist in-universe and King Mob was consciously imitating them.
    • Lewis Brodie, the Outer Church agent who captures Fanny and King Mob in "She-Man", is a parody of Bodie from The Professionals, who was played by Lewis Collins.
  • There was one issue of Justice League of America written in 2000 by Greg Weisman, in which the League travels to Paris and meets a clan of gargoyles living in Notre Dame cathedral, all of whom are clear Expies of the main cast of Weisman's cult classic TV show Gargoyles. There's the leader, "Behemoth" (Goliath), his ex-lover "Diabolique" (Demona), his daughter "Angelique" (Angela), his second-in-command "Montmarte" (Brooklyn), Angelique's lover "Montparnasse" (Broadway), the diminutive smart guy "Champs-Élysées" (Lexington), the team mentor "Seine" (Hudson), the Team Pet "Left Bank" (Bronx), and Behemoth's Evil Twin "Thomeheb" (Thailog).
  • When the teen supervillain Kid Karnevil attempted to infiltrate the Justice Society of America, he did so by posing as a patriotic superhero named the All-American Kid. All-American Kid's costume and backstory were extremely similar to those of Bucky, the sidekick of Captain America.
  • One story in The Maze Agency featured a detective named Senor Lobo, whom writer Mike Barr has acknowledged was a deliberate homage to Hercule Poirot.
  • Detective Gould from Matt Kindt's Red Handed is an expy of Dick Tracy. He wears a very similar suit and hat, has an array of retro-futuristic gizmos, and is named after Tracy creator Chester Gould.
  • Spider-Man:
    • Not too long ago, during Marvel's Dark Reign event, the Sinister Spider-Man title (Mac Gargan's Venom posing as Spider-Man) introduced us to Doctor Everything, a pretty blatant expy of Watchmen's Dr. Manhattan, right down to his... disturbing penchant for nudity.
    • Spider-Man villain Sergei Kravinoff a.k.a. Kraven the Hunter is an expy of General Zaroff of The Most Dangerous Game. While Hunting the Most Dangerous Game has become a widespread trope, it's no coincidence that the comic book villain shares the Russian aristocrat background of the original.
    • In a probably deliberate example, since the character is a Redeeming Replacement for one of Spider-Man's worst enemies, Phil Urich the heroic Green Goblin is an expy of Peter Parker. Urich is an Unlucky Everydude who works for the Daily Bugle and has an Uncle Ben just like Peter (although Urich's doesn't get killed). In the Spider-Girl series, the two characters are close friends.
  • X-Men:
    • Happened all the way back during the creation of the X-Men by Stan "The Man" Lee himself. When creating the original team of five, Lee decided he wanted to re-use the character of the Human Torch, but with ice powers instead of fire. The youngest member of the team, and also the most irresponsible and hot-headed, with the opposite super power...
    • Kieron Gillen has said (on House To Astonish) that Teon from Generation Hope is a character from his Warhammer comic reinvented as a superhero.
  • Everett K. Ross from Christopher Priest's Black Panther was heavily based off of Chandler Bing. In fact, according to Priest, the character was even called "Chandler" in the early pre-production phase before they settled on an actual name.
  • DC's Bumblebee is an obvious Expy of Marvel's Wasp. Everything from the power set, to her costume to the double-banger name (Janet Van-Dyne vs. Karen Beecher-Duncan).
  • Steve Gerber's creator-owned character Leonard the Duck was an expy of Howard the Duck, also created by Gerber, but owned by Marvel Comics. In fact, Leonard's introduction was a complicated situation where Gerber tied a Spider-Man and Howard crossover he was writing for Marvel with a Savage Dragon and Destroyer Duck crossover he was writing for Image Comics, suggesting that Leonard actually is Howard under an assumed name, and the Howard the Duck who's appeared in Marvel Comics since then is a clone.

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