History Main / FantasticDrug

27th May '16 6:52:35 AM Sharlee
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* Hypnocil is a dream suppressant from the ''Franchise/ANightmareOnElmStreet'' films. It's useful as a defense against Freddy's attacks, but is later shown to pose a serious risk of rendering patients comatose.
27th May '16 5:10:45 AM LadyJaneGrey
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* ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons''
** Tomacco, a tomato/tobacco hybrid accidentally invented by Homer. It's very addictive and makes people aggressive. Eventually a tobacco company executive tries to steal the last plant, which leads to [[AssholeVictim his helicopter being brought down by a tomacco-addicted sheep.]] (The sheep survives.)
** Swank, a drug marketed by the [[ShowWithinAShow villain in a movie Bart and Homer watch]]; it is ten times more addictive than marijuana.
17th May '16 4:47:56 AM Morgenthaler
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* In ''WesternAnimation/{{Nine}}'', BigGuy 8 is at one point seen holding a magnet over his head, making his eyes go all fuzzy in a DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything way; presumably it messes up the electronics in his head.
* The "So Beautiful, So Dangerous" segment of ''WesternAnimation/HeavyMetal'' shows two alien starship pilots getting wasted on a white powder they identify as "plutonium nyborg" and then flying home utterly stoned. "NOSEDIVE!"
* As with the book it was based off, ''Film/AScannerDarkly'' prominently features the use of Substance D.



* In ''[[WesternAnimation/{{Nine}} 9]]'', BigGuy 8 is at one point seen holding a magnet over his head, making his eyes go all fuzzy in a DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything way; presumably it messes up the electronics in his head.
* The "So Beautiful, So Dangerous" segment of ''WesternAnimation/HeavyMetal'' shows two alien starship pilots getting wasted on a white powder they identify as "plutonium nyborg" and then flying home utterly stoned. "NOSEDIVE!"
* As with the book it was based off, ''AScannerDarkly'' prominently features the use of Substance D.
16th May '16 6:55:34 PM DarkHunter
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* The ''Franchise/MassEffect'' ExpandedUniverse introduced red sand, implied to be cocaine that's been exposed to [[MinovskyPhysics element zero]] radiation. Gets the user high, and also lets them temporarily use a weakened form of biotic powers.

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* The ''Franchise/MassEffect'' ExpandedUniverse introduced red sand, implied to be cocaine that's been exposed to [[MinovskyPhysics element zero]] radiation. Gets the user high, and also lets them temporarily use a weakened form of biotic powers. It started popping up in the main game series soon afterward.



* ''Franchise/MassEffect'' has red sand, a derivative of [[MinovskyPhysics element zero]]. It gives the user temporary [[MindOverMatter biotic powers]], or enhances them if the user is a biotic.

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* ''Franchise/MassEffect'' has red sand, a derivative of [[MinovskyPhysics element zero]]. It gives the user temporary [[MindOverMatter biotic powers]], or enhances them if the user is a biotic. Other effects are unknown but it's implied to be extremely addictive and causes nasty psychological side effects, making it a banned substance across nearly all of Citadel space. It's legal on [[WretchedHive Illium]] though, provided one has acquired a license to sell it.
2nd May '16 4:54:07 PM Discar
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-->--'''Shunsaku Ban''', ''Manga/AstroBoy''

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-->--'''Shunsaku -->-- '''Shunsaku Ban''', ''Manga/AstroBoy''


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* ''Literature/TheStormlightArchive'': The Alethi elite are afflicted with something called "the Thrill," a race-wide bloodlust that drives them to fight, contest, and conquer. Their BloodKnight nature (as well as the fact that every aspect of their culture revolves around war and combat in some way) makes a lot more sense when you keep in mind that many of them are ''literally'' addicted to killing, and have built their society and religion to justify it. For example, the Vorin religion teaches that the afterlife is one massive war to reclaim [[{{Heaven}} the Tranquiline Halls]], so soldiers are the most important occupation, and getting your own soldiers killed in pointless battles isn't seen as a big deal since it's important training for the afterlife.
30th Apr '16 4:33:58 AM colin
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* ''WesternAnimation/WhereTheDeadGoToDie'': where in the second chapter of ''Liquid Memories'', that it happened of the unnamed protagonist is use the drug.
9th Apr '16 10:42:59 AM falcon2484
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* Then there is the UrbanLegend of [[http://www.snopes.com/horrors/drugs/bluestar.asp "Blue Star Acid."]] There's no evidence that "lick-n-stick tattoos" have ever been used to distribute LSD, or any other substance, to kids.
30th Mar '16 12:14:47 AM PaulA
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* ''Literature/DinnerAtDeviantsPalace'' by Creator/TimPowers features a drug with the street name "Blood" (it's a reddish-brown powder that makes people think of dried blood) that's reputed to give the user a sense of warmth, happiness, and freedom from care. [[spoiler:It turns out that one of the key ingredients is, in fact, human blood, harvested from the victims of a psychic vampire.]]
23rd Mar '16 12:43:15 PM Morgenthaler
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* ''{{Tracker}}'' had an Enixian who was making a drug that his species used as eyedrops into their highly sensitive eyes. It was destructive and often fatal to humans, which meant Cole and Mel had to put the producer out of business.

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* ''{{Tracker}}'' ''Series/{{Tracker}}'' had an Enixian who was making a drug that his species used as eyedrops into their highly sensitive eyes. It was destructive and often fatal to humans, which meant Cole and Mel had to put the producer out of business.
3rd Mar '16 4:05:10 PM Eievie
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* An episode of ''Manga/SilentMobius'' deals with a drug known as Dommel, which is a very powerful performance-enhancing drug... with a tendency to mutate its users into hideous monsters before dissolving into a puddle of goo. It's extracted from the body of an demon from another dimension.

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* An episode of ''Manga/SilentMobius'' deals with a drug known as Dommel, which is a very powerful performance-enhancing drug... drug… with a tendency to mutate its users into hideous monsters before dissolving into a puddle of goo. It's extracted from the body of an demon from another dimension.



* The BigBad of the Fishman Island arc in ''Manga/OnePiece'' uses this, as does his crew. It's called Energy Steroid, and taking one pill doubles your strength...but also shortens your life. We see the full effects at the end where [[spoiler: they age from their prime to weak old men just hours after the battle.]]

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* The BigBad of the Fishman Island arc in ''Manga/OnePiece'' uses this, as does his crew. It's called Energy Steroid, and taking one pill doubles your strength...strength… but also shortens your life. We see the full effects at the end where [[spoiler: they age from their prime to weak old men just hours after the battle.]]



* The ''Franchise/{{Batman}}'' comics give us "Venom", a highly addictive "super-steroid" which gives the user incredible strength, alertness, and agility temporarily. When first introduced, Batman himself is using it as a way to cope with his imperfections. He soon realizes he's made a terrible mistake, and must endure a horrific withdrawal before returning to normal. But Venom is most famous as the power source of Batman's enemy Bane, who wears a tank full of the stuff with tubes hooked up to his veins, giving him a constant, steady dose of Venom. The result is that he's incredibly strong (so much so that he once broke Batman's back...he got better) but totally dependent on the stuff, and Azrael eventually beat him by cutting off his supply.

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* The ''Franchise/{{Batman}}'' comics give us "Venom", a highly addictive "super-steroid" which gives the user incredible strength, alertness, and agility temporarily. When first introduced, Batman himself is using it as a way to cope with his imperfections. He soon realizes he's made a terrible mistake, and must endure a horrific withdrawal before returning to normal. But Venom is most famous as the power source of Batman's enemy Bane, who wears a tank full of the stuff with tubes hooked up to his veins, giving him a constant, steady dose of Venom. The result is that he's incredibly strong (so much so that he once broke Batman's back...back… he got better) but totally dependent on the stuff, and Azrael eventually beat him by cutting off his supply.



** Rapture was a legal designer drug developed by (and exclusive to) the Alchemax corporation that would be distributed to employees in order to keep them loyal to the company. A "very high-powered, mind-expanding hallucinogen," it causes the user to feel perfectly calm and collected ... unless he tries to fight the drug's effects, in which case it causes him to hallucinate wildly, "seeing monsters everywhere." It also bonds with the user's DNA in short order, becoming so addictive "you need it the way you need air to breathe." Geneticist Miguel O'Hara, who would become the Spider-Man of 2099, was slipped the drug by his boss when Miguel tried to quit the company. He tried to rid his system of Rapture by rewriting his own genetic code using a stored file of his genome which he'd been using for experiments. Things didn't go as planned, and Miguel ended up with spidery traits in his DNA as a result.

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** Rapture was a legal designer drug developed by (and exclusive to) the Alchemax corporation that would be distributed to employees in order to keep them loyal to the company. A "very high-powered, mind-expanding hallucinogen," it causes the user to feel perfectly calm and collected ... collected… unless he tries to fight the drug's effects, in which case it causes him to hallucinate wildly, "seeing monsters everywhere." It also bonds with the user's DNA in short order, becoming so addictive "you need it the way you need air to breathe." Geneticist Miguel O'Hara, who would become the Spider-Man of 2099, was slipped the drug by his boss when Miguel tried to quit the company. He tried to rid his system of Rapture by rewriting his own genetic code using a stored file of his genome which he'd been using for experiments. Things didn't go as planned, and Miguel ended up with spidery traits in his DNA as a result.



* The magic potion in ''ComicBook/{{Asterix}}'' is mostly just SuperSerum, but is played like this in a few stories where it's funnier. For instance, the druid who gives it to the villagers is named Getafix, athletes at the Olympic Games are banned from taking it, and in one story it's explicitly and repeatedly referred to as 'the dope' by a Roman trying to steal it. The official site also implies that it has some mild psychological effects, basically inducing childlike thought in people who drink it - explaining Obelix's [[ChildhoodBrainDamage strange personality]] and why even the more shrewd Gauls really enjoy beating people up on potion.

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* The magic potion in ''ComicBook/{{Asterix}}'' is mostly just SuperSerum, but is played like this in a few stories where it's funnier. For instance, the druid who gives it to the villagers is named Getafix, athletes at the Olympic Games are banned from taking it, and in one story it's explicitly and repeatedly referred to as 'the dope' by a Roman trying to steal it. The official site also implies that it has some mild psychological effects, basically inducing childlike thought in people who drink it - explaining it--explaining Obelix's [[ChildhoodBrainDamage strange personality]] and why even the more shrewd Gauls really enjoy beating people up on potion.



* Ed Nygma's invention, the "Mind Blender"...er, the Box from ''Film/BatmanForever'', which allows him to suck the neural energy of everybody watching TV with the thing. Taking hits from Nygma's machine is apparently quite addictive. The Riddler himself spends hours on a stylized throne shaped like "The Thinker", jittering like a coke fiend as he sucks up more energy.

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* Ed Nygma's invention, the "Mind Blender"...Blender"… er, the Box from ''Film/BatmanForever'', which allows him to suck the neural energy of everybody watching TV with the thing. Taking hits from Nygma's machine is apparently quite addictive. The Riddler himself spends hours on a stylized throne shaped like "The Thinker", jittering like a coke fiend as he sucks up more energy.



* In ''Literature/ABrothersPrice'', so-called "crib drugs" are used to keep men able and willing to have sex. One of those drugs is, apparently, called "Everlast". It is implied that making men last longer is not the only effect, though - they seem to also act as aphrodisiac.
* In ''Literature/DragonBones'', Muellen, the mother of the protagonist, is drugged most of the time. One of her favourites is "dreamroot", but she also has other plants in her garden. It's what happens when a botanist becomes severely depressed - she was a well-adjusted, but delicate soul in Ward's childhood. Then her abusive husband became too much to bear, and she started seeking solace in the psychoactive plants in her garden. She doesn't seem to be quite there even when she's not drugged, having effectively fled reality and turned herself into a full-time {{Cloudcuckoolander}}.

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* In ''Literature/ABrothersPrice'', so-called "crib drugs" are used to keep men able and willing to have sex. One of those drugs is, apparently, called "Everlast". It is implied that making men last longer is not the only effect, though - they though--they seem to also act as aphrodisiac.
* In ''Literature/DragonBones'', Muellen, the mother of the protagonist, is drugged most of the time. One of her favourites is "dreamroot", but she also has other plants in her garden. It's what happens when a botanist becomes severely depressed - she depressed--she was a well-adjusted, but delicate soul in Ward's childhood. Then her abusive husband became too much to bear, and she started seeking solace in the psychoactive plants in her garden. She doesn't seem to be quite there even when she's not drugged, having effectively fled reality and turned herself into a full-time {{Cloudcuckoolander}}.



* ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'' also features pretty heavy drug use
** Milk of the poppy is basically opium, which is usually used to deal with pain, but can also get addictive. Gregor Clegane takes it to deal with his chronic headaches, and seems to guzzle it like water.

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* ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'' also features pretty heavy drug use
a handful of drugs
** Milk ''Milk of the poppy is basically poppy''--basically opium, which is usually used to deal with pain, but can also get addictive. Gregor Clegane takes it to deal with his chronic headaches, and seems to guzzle it like water.



** Sourleaf is a mild drug apparently similar to tobacco that, when chewed, stains the user's teeth bloody red.
** Shade of the Evening is a psychotropic drug used by warlocks. It turns the user's lips blue.

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** Sourleaf is a ''Sourleaf''--a mild drug apparently similar to tobacco that, when chewed, stains the user's teeth bloody red.
** Shade ''Shade of the Evening is a evening''--a psychotropic drug used by warlocks. It turns the user's lips blue.



* Another Creator/PhilipKDick novel, ''The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch'' had Can-D, another hallucinogen. You might [[AuthorAppeal sense a theme...]]
* The third book of the ''Literature/{{Spaceforce}}'' series, ''Oblivion'', centres around a FantasticDrug of the same name. Oblivion induces a lucid dreaming state in users, allowing them to experience a fantasy scenario of their choice - innocent or less so. Unfortunately, it can also cause users to return to the dream state without warning and at random days or weeks later, often causing fatal accidents.

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* Another Creator/PhilipKDick novel, ''The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch'' had Can-D, another hallucinogen. You might [[AuthorAppeal sense a theme...]]
theme…]]
* The third book of the ''Literature/{{Spaceforce}}'' series, ''Oblivion'', centres around a FantasticDrug of the same name. Oblivion induces a lucid dreaming state in users, allowing them to experience a fantasy scenario of their choice - innocent choice--innocent or less so. Unfortunately, it can also cause users to return to the dream state without warning and at random days or weeks later, often causing fatal accidents.



* Creator/AlanDeanFoster created Bloodhype, which must have ''fantastic'' marketing to ever sell, given that ''one'' dose is addictive -- and withdrawal is ''fatal''.
* ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' novels have the troll drug Slab, which is ammonium chloride cut with radium and is a hallucinogen - but only if you're a troll. It also makes their brains melt.

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* Creator/AlanDeanFoster created Bloodhype, which must have ''fantastic'' marketing to ever sell, given that ''one'' dose is addictive -- and addictive--and withdrawal is ''fatal''.
* ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' novels have the troll drug Slab, which is ammonium chloride cut with radium and is a hallucinogen - but hallucinogen--but only if you're a troll. It also makes their brains melt.



** Most of the stuff listed is comparable to drugs on the streets today (bentlam is described in decent detail in ''Gray Lensman'' and comes off as pretty tame: basically snuff that conks you out). Then there's thionite: the big one, ''so'' dangerous that trafficking in it ''is a capital offense''. With thionite, the user experiences the illusion of the gratification of their every desire, however noble or base. The catch is that while the psychotropic effects are tolerance-inducing (and so incredibly addictive that the one-time user can be traumatised for months), the physiological effects are not - and eventually the increasing dose required by the addict to have the same psychological effect is lethal. Always. And the effective dose is ''tiny'': in ''First Lensman'', a single dose was described as several tiny granules in a nasal capsule.

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** Most of the stuff listed is comparable to drugs on the streets today (bentlam is described in decent detail in ''Gray Lensman'' and comes off as pretty tame: basically snuff that conks you out). Then there's thionite: the big one, ''so'' dangerous that trafficking in it ''is a capital offense''. With thionite, the user experiences the illusion of the gratification of their every desire, however noble or base. The catch is that while the psychotropic effects are tolerance-inducing (and so incredibly addictive that the one-time user can be traumatised for months), the physiological effects are not - and not--and eventually the increasing dose required by the addict to have the same psychological effect is lethal. Always. And the effective dose is ''tiny'': in ''First Lensman'', a single dose was described as several tiny granules in a nasal capsule.



** Pure [[http://starwars.wikia.com/wiki/Glitterstim glitterstim]] is made by giant underground spiders, is activated by light, and grants temporary ability to read nonhostile minds, although it also brings paranoia and apparently can make people stupider - in the Literature/XWingSeries, a habitual glitbiter forgets that he's talking to Wedge Antilles via hologram and thinks he's under attack.

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** Pure [[http://starwars.wikia.com/wiki/Glitterstim glitterstim]] is made by giant underground spiders, is activated by light, and grants temporary ability to read nonhostile minds, although it also brings paranoia and apparently can make people stupider - in stupider--in the Literature/XWingSeries, a habitual glitbiter forgets that he's talking to Wedge Antilles via hologram and thinks he's under attack.



* ''Literature/{{Bordertown}}'' has a river (theMad River, aptly enough) of this stuff, which, oddly, produces edible fish which are a bit freaky but don't cause intoxication. There's also "dragon's milk", which is a drug for [[OurElvesAreBetter elves]] but just makes humans sick, and the drug in ''Finder'' which supposedly turns its users into elves... needless to say, it doesn't work.

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* ''Literature/{{Bordertown}}'' has a river (theMad River, aptly enough) of this stuff, which, oddly, produces edible fish which are a bit freaky but don't cause intoxication. There's also "dragon's milk", which is a drug for [[OurElvesAreBetter elves]] but just makes humans sick, and the drug in ''Finder'' which supposedly turns its users into elves... elves… needless to say, it doesn't work.



* ''Literature/TheNameOfTheWind'' by Patrick Rothfuss has Denner Resin, which acts like opium. Addicts can be spotted because of their very white smiles (and the fact that they will do ''anything'' to get their next fix). This becomes a significant plot point when [[spoiler: a local dragon finds a Denner Tree orchard, eats the trees, and becomes addicted. And then it runs out of trees...]]

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* ''Literature/TheNameOfTheWind'' by Patrick Rothfuss has Denner Resin, which acts like opium. Addicts can be spotted because of their very white smiles (and the fact that they will do ''anything'' to get their next fix). This becomes a significant plot point when [[spoiler: a local dragon finds a Denner Tree orchard, eats the trees, and becomes addicted. And then it runs out of trees...]]trees…]]



* ''Literature/LabyrinthsOfEcho'' has a few, and established early on that people born in one world reacts abnormally on psychoactive substances of another. So while locals, along with children, guzzle their Soup of Rest for a little relaxation and daydreaming, while Sir Max was instantly on high to the giggling idiocy followed by a withdrawal "as if trying to GoingColdTurkey after several years of heroin addiction" despite the help of highly skilled healers. On the other hand, Kakhar's Balsam is a psychostimulant strong enough that locals don't let each other drive under it, even though their traffic is excruciatingly slow by our standards, while Max drinks it much like strong coffee, and suffers even less side-effects. Conversely, once he accidentally acquired pot from our world and gave it to his NighInvulnerable friend with steel self-control to "relax a little" -- HilarityEnsues; he was berated for not having a clue after personal experience with such things.

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* ''Literature/LabyrinthsOfEcho'' has a few, and established early on that people born in one world reacts abnormally on psychoactive substances of another. So while locals, along with children, guzzle their Soup of Rest for a little relaxation and daydreaming, while Sir Max was instantly on high to the giggling idiocy followed by a withdrawal "as if trying to GoingColdTurkey after several years of heroin addiction" despite the help of highly skilled healers. On the other hand, Kakhar's Balsam is a psychostimulant strong enough that locals don't let each other drive under it, even though their traffic is excruciatingly slow by our standards, while Max drinks it much like strong coffee, and suffers even less side-effects. Conversely, once he accidentally acquired pot from our world and gave it to his NighInvulnerable friend with steel self-control to "relax a little" -- HilarityEnsues; little"--HilarityEnsues; he was berated for not having a clue after personal experience with such things.



* ''Literature/TheButterflyKid'' gives us the "reality pill", a psychedelic which causes hallucinations that physically manifest. The alien invaders planned to use it to cause chaos. Unfortunately for them, our heroes are hippies who know how to handle their drugs....

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* ''Literature/TheButterflyKid'' gives us the "reality pill", a psychedelic which causes hallucinations that physically manifest. The alien invaders planned to use it to cause chaos. Unfortunately for them, our heroes are hippies who know how to handle their drugs....drugs…



* The ''Literature/{{Thraxas}}'' books feature two of note - thazis, which seems to be roughly equivalent to cannabis, and dwa, which seems to be the equivalent of heroin.

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* The ''Literature/{{Thraxas}}'' books feature two of note - thazis, note--''thazis'', which seems to be roughly equivalent to cannabis, and dwa, ''dwa'', which seems to be the equivalent of heroin.



* The Trolls of ''TheTenthKingdom'' have "dwarf moss" that makes you see fairies. However, the real example is the Troll King's invisibility shoes, which give their wearer such a great sense of power that they become more and more obsessed with wearing them all the time. Even touching them seems to be enough to begin the process; as soon as Virginia does so, she hides them in her backpack, thinks of nothing else, and acts increasingly paranoid, even clutching the shoes like Linus's security blanket. This is [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] by Wolf (twice!) when he claims "magic is very nice, but it's very easy to get addicted", and later tells Virginia she is "hopelessly addicted to those shoes... and I'm not too far behind!" Whether this is meant to be a parody or an object lesson is never made clear, but it certainly plays out with extreme hilarity.

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* The Trolls of ''TheTenthKingdom'' have "dwarf moss" that makes you see fairies. However, the real example is the Troll King's invisibility shoes, which give their wearer such a great sense of power that they become more and more obsessed with wearing them all the time. Even touching them seems to be enough to begin the process; as soon as Virginia does so, she hides them in her backpack, thinks of nothing else, and acts increasingly paranoid, even clutching the shoes like Linus's security blanket. This is [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] by Wolf (twice!) when he claims "magic is very nice, but it's very easy to get addicted", and later tells Virginia she is "hopelessly addicted to those shoes... shoes… and I'm not too far behind!" Whether this is meant to be a parody or an object lesson is never made clear, but it certainly plays out with extreme hilarity.



** A later example would be the scene in the Deadly Swamp, where Tony and Virginia eat the magic mushrooms, drink the swamp water, and sleep ([[GenreBlind after being explicitly told not to]]) and hallucinate a [[DreamSequence bizarre dream]]. The fact that Music/ProcolHarum's "Whiter Shade of Pale" plays throughout is of course only window dressing for setting the scene...

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** A later example would be the scene in the Deadly Swamp, where Tony and Virginia eat the magic mushrooms, drink the swamp water, and sleep ([[GenreBlind after being explicitly told not to]]) and hallucinate a [[DreamSequence bizarre dream]]. The fact that Music/ProcolHarum's "Whiter Shade of Pale" plays throughout is of course only window dressing for setting the scene...scene…



* ''Series/{{Farscape}}'' has "Distillate of Laka" which helps take the edge off of John's Aeryn issues...when he doubles the dose.

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* ''Series/{{Farscape}}'' has "Distillate of Laka" which helps take the edge off of John's Aeryn issues...issues… when he doubles the dose.



* ''Series/InTheFlesh'' has a new drug just for zombies (or act and behave like people but without the need to drink or eat) and seems rather popular seeing as no other vices are available to them. The only person we see use one however ends up dead...well, more dead at any rate.

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* ''Series/InTheFlesh'' has a new drug just for zombies (or act and behave like people but without the need to drink or eat) and seems rather popular seeing as no other vices are available to them. The only person we see use one however ends up dead...dead… well, more dead at any rate.



* The Piraka in ''Franchise/{{Bionicle}}'' bribe Brutaka (who's a good guy suffering from a major CrisisOfFaith) into working for them by supplying him with Antidermis. This works as a sort of highly powerful steroid to his species... and is also the substance that (unknown to them) [[EnergyBeing makes up]] the [[BigBad Makuta]]. As long as he only received small doses of the stuff (which were separated from Makuta's mind), he got a [[AmplifierArtifact power boost]], but when he soaked up multiple ''full'' Makuta essences, [[ManySpiritsInsideOfOne they took control over his body]], seemingly permanently -- but in return, [[PowersViaPossession made him infinitely more powerful]].

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* The Piraka in ''Franchise/{{Bionicle}}'' bribe Brutaka (who's a good guy suffering from a major CrisisOfFaith) into working for them by supplying him with Antidermis. This works as a sort of highly powerful steroid to his species... species… and is also the substance that (unknown to them) [[EnergyBeing makes up]] the [[BigBad Makuta]]. As long as he only received small doses of the stuff (which were separated from Makuta's mind), he got a [[AmplifierArtifact power boost]], but when he soaked up multiple ''full'' Makuta essences, [[ManySpiritsInsideOfOne they took control over his body]], seemingly permanently -- but permanently--but in return, [[PowersViaPossession made him infinitely more powerful]].



** Combat drugs aside, there are several recreational drugs that exist in the background as well. The most ubiquitous being the narcotic lho-sticks, which are smoked like a cigarette and apparently an opiate. Others include obscura, gladstones, and grinweed. Another example that plays the trope much straighter is flects, which are warp-saturated bits of broken glass, "used" simply by looking into them; keep in mind that since they are tainted by the [[HyperspaceIsAScaryPlace warp]], flects are a much more insidious example than most others on this page...
** The urban gang-warfare spinoff game Necromunda allows outlaw gangs to buy and use a variety of exotic drugs, including the frenzy-inducing 'slaught, "spook", which confers minor psychic powers at the price of probable mental and spiritual damage, and the powerful Icrotic Slime, which is really a brain-eating alien parasite that induces euphoria and considerable physical enhancements in its host to discourage removal (the user or an associate has to remove it before it encysts and begins feeding..).

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** Combat drugs aside, there are several recreational drugs that exist in the background as well. The most ubiquitous being the narcotic lho-sticks, which are smoked like a cigarette and apparently an opiate. Others include obscura, gladstones, and grinweed. Another example that plays the trope much straighter is flects, which are warp-saturated bits of broken glass, "used" simply by looking into them; keep in mind that since they are tainted by the [[HyperspaceIsAScaryPlace warp]], flects are a much more insidious example than most others on this page...
page…
** The urban gang-warfare spinoff game Necromunda allows outlaw gangs to buy and use a variety of exotic drugs, including the frenzy-inducing 'slaught, "spook", which confers minor psychic powers at the price of probable mental and spiritual damage, and the powerful Icrotic Slime, which is really a brain-eating alien parasite that induces euphoria and considerable physical enhancements in its host to discourage removal (the user or an associate has to remove it before it encysts and begins feeding..feeding.).



** The ''Mythologies'' sourcebook for ''Requiem'' actually introduces a drug specifically for vampires -- Solace. It's injected via the tongue, made partly from the blood of teenaged "cutters", and allows the vampire to temporarily feel like they're alive again. It's extremely addictive.

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** The ''Mythologies'' sourcebook for ''Requiem'' actually introduces a drug specifically for vampires -- Solace.vampires--Solace. It's injected via the tongue, made partly from the blood of teenaged "cutters", and allows the vampire to temporarily feel like they're alive again. It's extremely addictive.



*** The "Rites of Spring" sourcebook for Changeling: The Lost also notes that a shot of Glamour (the "mana" of changelings) has the same general effects as Solace -- it makes a vampire feel alive again.
** One running plot for the ''TabletopGame/{{Orpheus}}'' line involved "pigment," a special type of heroin created by exposure to ghostly matter. Those who overdosed on it became their own special type of ghost - a "Hue," which could use [[TheDarkSide Spite]] with reduced penalty.

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*** The "Rites of Spring" sourcebook for Changeling: The Lost also notes that a shot of Glamour (the "mana" of changelings) has the same general effects as Solace -- it Solace--it makes a vampire feel alive again.
** One running plot for the ''TabletopGame/{{Orpheus}}'' line involved "pigment," a special type of heroin created by exposure to ghostly matter. Those who overdosed on it became their own special type of ghost - a ghost--a "Hue," which could use [[TheDarkSide Spite]] with reduced penalty.



* The future world of ''TabletopGame/{{Shadowrun}}'' has come up with a ''lot'' of these. Perhaps the most interesting is "deepweed", an Awakened form of seaweed that causes you to astrally perceive when eaten... whether you want to or not. Then there's BTL (short for [[Series/RedDwarf "Better Than Life"]]) chips/programs, which come in varieties ranging from "pornography" to "emotional overload" to "deliberate synthesia".

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* The future world of ''TabletopGame/{{Shadowrun}}'' has come up with a ''lot'' of these. Perhaps the most interesting is "deepweed", an Awakened form of seaweed that causes you to astrally perceive when eaten... eaten… whether you want to or not. Then there's BTL (short for [[Series/RedDwarf "Better Than Life"]]) chips/programs, which come in varieties ranging from "pornography" to "emotional overload" to "deliberate synthesia".



* ''TabletopGame/EclipsePhase'' features a lot of drugs. Recreational drugs, combat drugs, social drugs, narcoalgorithms for cybershelled characters... but most notably nanodrugs that use NanoMachines to induce states that simple chemicals could never accomplish. For instance "petals" are a variety of nanite-infused flowers whose petals send the user into a very trippy virtual reality when consumed; one popular variety makes the user think his hand has detached itself and is running away.

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* ''TabletopGame/EclipsePhase'' features a lot of drugs. Recreational drugs, combat drugs, social drugs, narcoalgorithms for cybershelled characters... characters… but most notably nanodrugs that use NanoMachines to induce states that simple chemicals could never accomplish. For instance "petals" are a variety of nanite-infused flowers whose petals send the user into a very trippy virtual reality when consumed; one popular variety makes the user think his hand has detached itself and is running away.



** Some products were addictive in some but not all games they showed up in. Ordinary Nuka-Cola, for instance, was addictive in the first two games and ''Tactics'' but not in ''3'' or ''New Vegas'' (granted, it was a rather benign addiction -- all withdrawal did was tell you you craved another Nuka-Cola -- and there ''are'' several references and allusions to it in ''3''). The same is true for Radaway, though with a slightly harsher addiction and no mention at all in later games.

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** Some products were addictive in some but not all games they showed up in. Ordinary Nuka-Cola, for instance, was addictive in the first two games and ''Tactics'' but not in ''3'' or ''New Vegas'' (granted, it was a rather benign addiction -- all addiction--all withdrawal did was tell you you craved another Nuka-Cola -- and Nuka-Cola--and there ''are'' several references and allusions to it in ''3''). The same is true for Radaway, though with a slightly harsher addiction and no mention at all in later games.



* Black Lotus is mentioned in passing several times in ''VideoGame/BaldursGateII'' - a backroom in the Cornet Inn suggest that it's an Opium Analog, and for a very mercantile city, Amn forbid the selling of it.

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* Black Lotus is mentioned in passing several times in ''VideoGame/BaldursGateII'' - a ''VideoGame/BaldursGateII''--a backroom in the Cornet Inn suggest that it's an Opium Analog, and for a very mercantile city, Amn forbid the selling of it.



* Instead of the benign {{Mana}} potions [[StandardRPGItems found in other games,]] ''Franchise/DragonAge'' features lyrium, an addictive mineral that can either be inhaled as a powder or made into elixirs. Side effects include delusions, paranoia, dementia, obsessive behavior, hallucinations, [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking dry mouth]]...higher doses or exposure to large amounts of naturally occurring lyrium can cause overdose-like symptoms along the lines of brain damage and death.

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* Instead of the benign {{Mana}} potions [[StandardRPGItems found in other games,]] ''Franchise/DragonAge'' features lyrium, an addictive mineral that can either be inhaled as a powder or made into elixirs. Side effects include delusions, paranoia, dementia, obsessive behavior, hallucinations, [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking dry mouth]]...mouth…]] higher doses or exposure to large amounts of naturally occurring lyrium can cause overdose-like symptoms along the lines of brain damage and death.



* The nastier effects of lyrium usage are shown in even greater degree in ''Videogame/DragonAgeInquisition''. Cullen struggles throughout the game with lyrium withdrawal, since he stopped taking lyrium after leaving the Order. He also tries to discourage a Warrior Inquisitor from becoming a Templar since that means taking lyrium. And that's not getting into Red Lyrium, a far more potent variety [[spoiler:which was used in the above-mentioned idol's creation.]] As Varric puts it red lyrium is lyrium like a dragon is a lizard. Regular lyrium is only dangerous if it's ingested. Just being near red lyrium is dangerous enough, let alone consuming it. [[spoiler:Red lyrium is normal lyrium tainted by the Blight...which means that lyrium is technically alive, since minerals aren't affected by the Blight.]]

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* The nastier effects of lyrium usage are shown in even greater degree in ''Videogame/DragonAgeInquisition''. Cullen struggles throughout the game with lyrium withdrawal, since he stopped taking lyrium after leaving the Order. He also tries to discourage a Warrior Inquisitor from becoming a Templar since that means taking lyrium. And that's not getting into Red Lyrium, a far more potent variety [[spoiler:which was used in the above-mentioned idol's creation.]] As Varric puts it red lyrium is lyrium like a dragon is a lizard. Regular lyrium is only dangerous if it's ingested. Just being near red lyrium is dangerous enough, let alone consuming it. [[spoiler:Red lyrium is normal lyrium tainted by the Blight...Blight… which means that lyrium is technically alive, since minerals aren't affected by the Blight.]]



** It was suggested that consumable amber certain hallucinogenic effects on human users. When human enemies briefly sees or hears something moving in the corner (Styx), but then lose perception before they get suspicious, they may say "(Beep—), and I didn't even taken any amber...." and dismiss it as themselves seeing or hearing things.

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** It was suggested that consumable amber certain hallucinogenic effects on human users. When human enemies briefly sees or hears something moving in the corner (Styx), but then lose perception before they get suspicious, they may say "(Beep—), "(Beep-), and I didn't even taken any amber...." amber…" and dismiss it as themselves seeing or hearing things.



* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII'' occasionally dips into this with Mako. In combination with Jenova cells it gives people superhuman abilities and glowing eyes - when exposed to high levels souls become intertwined and a psychedelic VisionQuest results. It's also poisonous, physically addictive, and the Mako therapy use is very bad for one's mental health.

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* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII'' occasionally dips into this with Mako. In combination with Jenova cells it gives people superhuman abilities and glowing eyes - when eyes--when exposed to high levels souls become intertwined and a psychedelic VisionQuest results. It's also poisonous, physically addictive, and the Mako therapy use is very bad for one's mental health.



* ''VideoGame/KingdomOfLoathing'' has ''goofballs'', which gives you a nice 20% Muscle and Moxie boost that lasts 10 adventures. It's the withdrawal debuff that gets you tho- you lose 10% of '''all''' your stats until the game considers that you have officially kicked the addiction after going around with the debuff for 30 adventures. Also, the dealer that gives you the first bottle for free [[AdamSmithHatesYourGuts subsequently increase the price of each bottle by 1000 meat with each purchase]].

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* ''VideoGame/KingdomOfLoathing'' has ''goofballs'', which gives you a nice 20% Muscle and Moxie boost that lasts 10 adventures. It's the withdrawal debuff that gets you tho- you thought--you lose 10% of '''all''' your stats until the game considers that you have officially kicked the addiction after going around with the debuff for 30 adventures. Also, the dealer that gives you the first bottle for free [[AdamSmithHatesYourGuts subsequently increase the price of each bottle by 1000 meat with each purchase]].



* In ''Webcomic/{{Sinfest}}'', [[http://sinfest.net/view.php?date=2012-04-10 Jogs, apparently.]] [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Endorphin#Runner.27s_high Some truth in the matter...]]

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* In ''Webcomic/{{Sinfest}}'', [[http://sinfest.net/view.php?date=2012-04-10 Jogs, apparently.]] [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Endorphin#Runner.27s_high Some truth in the matter...]]matter…]]



* Bender from ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'' loves to smoke and drink, but that's okay since he's a robot. However, robots can become addicted to electricity, as Bender did in "Hell is Other Robots". It eventually caused him to be dragged to Robot Hell...

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* Bender from ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'' loves to smoke and drink, but that's okay since he's a robot. However, robots can become addicted to electricity, as Bender did in "Hell is Other Robots". It eventually caused him to be dragged to Robot Hell...Hell…



--> '''Pickles:''' I grew up smokin' government weed everyday, you know...

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--> '''Pickles:''' I grew up smokin' government weed everyday, you know...know…



-->'''Abe:''' Hm. I don't really feel anything... Well, I have a strong constitution, so I don't really ''I CAN TASTE THE SUN!!!''

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-->'''Abe:''' Hm. I don't really feel anything... anything… Well, I have a strong constitution, so I don't really ''I CAN TASTE THE SUN!!!''



* ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'': The episode "Major Boobage" has the town in a moral panic over "cheesing" - getting high off cat pee (where their hallucinations are a parody of ''Film/HeavyMetal'').

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* ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'': The episode "Major Boobage" has the town in a moral panic over "cheesing" - getting "cheesing"--getting high off cat pee (where their hallucinations are a parody of ''Film/HeavyMetal'').
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