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** The back of the 2007 Complete Series DVD, when listing the contents of the bonus disc, refers to "Lucy Goes to Scotland" as "the first fully-colorized episode!" Three years later, CBS/Paramount repackaged the disc by itself, and updated the "Scotland" description to, "the only full-length colorized episode". It only took one more year -- when ''The Best of I Love Lucy'' revealed a colorized version of "Lucy's Italian Movie" -- before the first description began sounding more accurate, and now casual fans have likely lost count of how many episodes CBS had "fully colorized".

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** The back of the 2007 Complete Series DVD, when listing the contents of the bonus disc, refers to "Lucy Goes to Scotland" as "the first fully-colorized episode!" ''fully-colorized I Love Lucy'' episode". Three years later, CBS/Paramount repackaged the disc by itself, and updated the "Scotland" description to, "the only full-length colorized episode". It only took one more year -- when ''The Best of I Love Lucy'' revealed a colorized version of "Lucy's Italian Movie" -- before the first description began sounding more accurate, and now casual fans most people have likely lost count of how many episodes CBS had "fully colorized".


* HilariousInHindsight: In the episode "Lucy Gets Ricky on the Radio", Lucy says that there are 46 states. Ethel corrects her with the right number at the time the episode was made, 48. Then Lucy responds that she forgot Alaska and Hawaii. That line used to be funny because they ''weren't'' states then. Now they ''are''.

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* HilariousInHindsight: HilariousInHindsight:
**
In the episode "Lucy Gets Ricky on the Radio", Lucy says that there are 46 states. Ethel corrects her with the right number at the time the episode was made, 48. Then Lucy responds that she forgot Alaska and Hawaii. That line used to be funny because they ''weren't'' states then. Now they ''are''.''are''.
** The back of the 2007 Complete Series DVD, when listing the contents of the bonus disc, refers to "Lucy Goes to Scotland" as "the first fully-colorized episode!" Three years later, CBS/Paramount repackaged the disc by itself, and updated the "Scotland" description to, "the only full-length colorized episode". It only took one more year -- when ''The Best of I Love Lucy'' revealed a colorized version of "Lucy's Italian Movie" -- before the first description began sounding more accurate, and now casual fans have likely lost count of how many episodes CBS had "fully colorized".


* BetterOnDVD: For years, syndicated reruns would edit the episodes for time, and would lack the animated sponsor messages and bumpers. The DVD and Blu-ray releases restore every episode to their original running time (which, back in the '50s, would often mean 26 minutes per episode, virtually unheard of today) and included the animated bits. As a literal example of this trope, the Complete Series DVD boxsets from 2007 and 2014[[note]]a compact repackaging lacking the ''I Love Lucy: The Movie'' DVD, now sold separately[[/note]] remain the most comprehensive ''I Love Lucy'' home media releases, considering the Blu-ray sets stopped at season two, and the digital retailers skipped several episodes.

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* BetterOnDVD: For years, syndicated reruns would edit the episodes for time, and would lack the animated sponsor messages and bumpers. The DVD and Blu-ray releases restore every episode to their original running time (which, back in the '50s, would often mean 26 minutes per episode, virtually unheard of today) and included the animated bits. As a literal example of this trope, the Complete Series DVD boxsets from 2007 and 2014[[note]]a 2015[[note]]a compact repackaging lacking the ''I Love Lucy: The Movie'' DVD, now sold separately[[/note]] remain the most comprehensive ''I Love Lucy'' home media releases, considering the Blu-ray sets stopped at season two, and the digital retailers skipped several episodes.


* BetterOnDVD: For years, syndicated reruns would edit the episodes for time, and would lack the animated sponsor messages and bumpers. The DVD and Blu-ray releases restore every episode to their original running time (which, back in the '50s, would often mean 26 minutes per episode, virtually unheard of today) and included the animated bits.

to:

* BetterOnDVD: For years, syndicated reruns would edit the episodes for time, and would lack the animated sponsor messages and bumpers. The DVD and Blu-ray releases restore every episode to their original running time (which, back in the '50s, would often mean 26 minutes per episode, virtually unheard of today) and included the animated bits. As a literal example of this trope, the Complete Series DVD boxsets from 2007 and 2014[[note]]a compact repackaging lacking the ''I Love Lucy: The Movie'' DVD, now sold separately[[/note]] remain the most comprehensive ''I Love Lucy'' home media releases, considering the Blu-ray sets stopped at season two, and the digital retailers skipped several episodes.


%%*** Let's put it this way--''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'', one of the most irreverent shows on television, did an episode about domestic violence ("Screams of Silence: The Brenda Q Story"), and [[DudeNotFunny played it without a single joke]]. Even ''they'' [[EveryoneHasStandards wouldn't go as far as to make spousal abuse into a gag.]] And ''I Love Lucy'' made it the entire plot of a lighthearted comedy. Society truly does march on.


* HollywoodPudgy: UrbanLegend has it that Vivian Vance (Ethel) was contractually obligated to remain overweight, which was born out of a mock contract that Lucy presented to Vivian strictly as a joke, and which Vivian later read for laughs on ''The Dinah Shore Show''. Ethel's stockier appearance was obtained by dressing Vivian in unflattering costumes and too-small undergarments, not by intentional weight gain on Vance's part (at her insistence, the character's wardrobe and style would become more flattering as the series progressed). Vivian fought against Ethel being too heavy, arguing that if Fred called her a fat old bag if she were ''really'' overweight, the scene would fall flat because you'd feel sorry for her; whereas if he called her that when she clearly wasn't fat or ugly, the dissonance of it would instead makes it funny.

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* HollywoodPudgy: UrbanLegend has it that Vivian Vance (Ethel) was contractually obligated to remain overweight, which was born out of a mock contract that Lucy presented to Vivian strictly as a joke, and which Vivian later read for laughs on ''The ''[[Creator/DinahShore The Dinah Shore Show''.Show]]''. Ethel's stockier appearance was obtained by dressing Vivian in unflattering costumes and too-small undergarments, not by intentional weight gain on Vance's part (at her insistence, the character's wardrobe and style would become more flattering as the series progressed). Vivian fought against Ethel being too heavy, arguing that if Fred called her a fat old bag if she were ''really'' overweight, the scene would fall flat because you'd feel sorry for her; whereas if he called her that when she clearly wasn't fat or ugly, the dissonance of it would instead makes it funny.


*** Let's put it this way--''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'', one of the most irreverent shows on television, did an episode about domestic violence ("Screams of Silence: The Brenda Q Story"), and [[DudeNotFunny played it without a single joke]]. Even ''they'' [[EveryoneHasStandards wouldn't go as far as to make spousal abuse into a gag.]] And ''I Love Lucy'' made it the entire plot of a lighthearted comedy. Society truly does march on.

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*** %%*** Let's put it this way--''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'', one of the most irreverent shows on television, did an episode about domestic violence ("Screams of Silence: The Brenda Q Story"), and [[DudeNotFunny played it without a single joke]]. Even ''they'' [[EveryoneHasStandards wouldn't go as far as to make spousal abuse into a gag.]] And ''I Love Lucy'' made it the entire plot of a lighthearted comedy. Society truly does march on.


* ValuesResonance: Ricky Ricardo as a Latino character who isn't an offensive stereotype and plays the role of StraightMan. They managed to write him as a character with different traits without erasing or exaggerating his Cuban heritage. Also he and Lucy raise Little Ricky in a household that is bilingual, in a time when Latino students would be punished for speaking Spanish at school.

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* ValuesResonance: Ricky Ricardo as a Latino character who isn't an offensive stereotype and plays the role of StraightMan. They managed to write him as a character with different traits without erasing or exaggerating his Cuban heritage. Also he and Lucy raise Little Ricky in a household that is bilingual, in a time when Latino students would be punished for speaking Spanish at school. Ball and Arnaz actually had to fight the network a bit to be allowed to play a married couple, despite actually being married.


** The ''entirety'' of "Lucy Gets a Black Eye" would ''never'' pass censors of any kind today. The basic plot of the episode: Lucy and Ricky are both excited about a new thriller novel, and, because they can't wait for the other to finish, opt to read it aloud like a play. Unfortunately, Ethel overhears them reciting the lines of a fight scene and thinks they're ''actually'' arguing. Ricky then gets overeager and accidentally drops the book; it flies across the room and gives Lucy a black eye. We as the audience know that it's totally innocent, but Ethel is convinced that Ricky [[DomesticAbuse deliberately punched his wife]], and becomes terrified for her. Later, when Ethel comes to get details about what happened and refuses to believe the odd but true incident, a frustrated Lucy concocts "a real juicy story" about Ricky grabbing, punching, and kicking at her, and reenacts the fictional battle, including her cowering in fear and begging for mercy. ''And this is all PlayedForLaughs''. The audience goes wild at Lucy's antics, but it's genuinely disturbing and realistic to see her whimpering in fear and crying as she describes being ''brutally beaten by her husband'', even she's just pretending.

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** The ''entirety'' of "Lucy Gets a Black Eye" would ''never'' pass censors of any kind today. The basic plot of the episode: Lucy and Ricky are both excited about a new thriller novel, and, because they can't wait for the other to finish, opt to read it aloud like a play. Unfortunately, Ethel overhears them reciting the lines of a fight scene and thinks they're ''actually'' arguing. Ricky then gets overeager and accidentally drops the book; it flies across the room and gives Lucy a black eye. We as the audience know that it's totally innocent, but Ethel is convinced that Ricky [[DomesticAbuse deliberately punched his wife]], wife]] and becomes terrified for her. Later, when Ethel comes to get details about what happened and refuses to believe the odd but true incident, a frustrated Lucy concocts "a real juicy story" about Ricky grabbing, punching, and kicking at her, and reenacts the fictional battle, including her cowering in fear and begging for mercy. ''And this is all PlayedForLaughs''. The audience goes wild at Lucy's antics, but it's genuinely disturbing and realistic to see her whimpering in fear and crying as she describes being ''brutally beaten by her husband'', even she's just pretending.


** The ''entirety'' of "Lucy Gets a Black Eye" would ''never'' pass censors of any kind today. The basic plot of the episode: Lucy and Ricky are both excited about a new thriller novel, and, because they can't wait for the other to finish, opt to read it aloud like a play. Unfortunately, Ethel overhears them reciting the lines of a fight scene and thinks they're ''actually'' arguing; Ricky then gets too into the part and throws the book, giving Lucy a black eye. We as the audience know that it's totally innocent, but Ethel is convinced that Ricky [[DomesticAbuse deliberately punched his wife]], and becomes terrified for her. Later, when Ethel comes to get details about what happened and refuses to believe the odd but true incident, a frustrated Lucy concocts "a real juicy story" about Ricky grabbing, punching, and kicking at her, and reenacts the fictional battle, including her cowering in fear and begging for mercy. ''This is all PlayedForLaughs''. The audience goes wild at Lucy's antics, but it's genuinely disturbing and realistic to see her whimpering in fear and crying, even if it just her pretending.

to:

** The ''entirety'' of "Lucy Gets a Black Eye" would ''never'' pass censors of any kind today. The basic plot of the episode: Lucy and Ricky are both excited about a new thriller novel, and, because they can't wait for the other to finish, opt to read it aloud like a play. Unfortunately, Ethel overhears them reciting the lines of a fight scene and thinks they're ''actually'' arguing; arguing. Ricky then gets too into overeager and accidentally drops the part book; it flies across the room and throws the book, giving gives Lucy a black eye. We as the audience know that it's totally innocent, but Ethel is convinced that Ricky [[DomesticAbuse deliberately punched his wife]], and becomes terrified for her. Later, when Ethel comes to get details about what happened and refuses to believe the odd but true incident, a frustrated Lucy concocts "a real juicy story" about Ricky grabbing, punching, and kicking at her, and reenacts the fictional battle, including her cowering in fear and begging for mercy. ''This ''And this is all PlayedForLaughs''. The audience goes wild at Lucy's antics, but it's genuinely disturbing and realistic to see her whimpering in fear and crying, crying as she describes being ''brutally beaten by her husband'', even if it she's just pretending.
*** Even Ethel's concerned attitude has problematic elements--while she is genuinely worried about Lucy, she's also clearly [[GossipyHens excited to hear
her pretending.gossip about Ricky]] and eagerly fills in more aggressive details herself. The notion of ''anyone'', let alone someone's best friend, treating domestic abuse of any kind so flippantly is shocking.

Added DiffLines:

** The ''entirety'' of "Lucy Gets a Black Eye" would ''never'' pass censors of any kind today. The basic plot of the episode: Lucy and Ricky are both excited about a new thriller novel, and, because they can't wait for the other to finish, opt to read it aloud like a play. Unfortunately, Ethel overhears them reciting the lines of a fight scene and thinks they're ''actually'' arguing; Ricky then gets too into the part and throws the book, giving Lucy a black eye. We as the audience know that it's totally innocent, but Ethel is convinced that Ricky [[DomesticAbuse deliberately punched his wife]], and becomes terrified for her. Later, when Ethel comes to get details about what happened and refuses to believe the odd but true incident, a frustrated Lucy concocts "a real juicy story" about Ricky grabbing, punching, and kicking at her, and reenacts the fictional battle, including her cowering in fear and begging for mercy. ''This is all PlayedForLaughs''. The audience goes wild at Lucy's antics, but it's genuinely disturbing and realistic to see her whimpering in fear and crying, even if it just her pretending.
*** In the same sequence, Lucy remarks "You know how wild those Cubans are" regarding Ricky's temper, a rather racist notion that, [[SpicyLatina tropes aside]], likely wouldn't fly today.
*** Let's put it this way--''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'', one of the most irreverent shows on television, did an episode about domestic violence ("Screams of Silence: The Brenda Q Story"), and [[DudeNotFunny played it without a single joke]]. Even ''they'' [[EveryoneHasStandards wouldn't go as far as to make spousal abuse into a gag.]] And ''I Love Lucy'' made it the entire plot of a lighthearted comedy. Society truly does march on.

Added DiffLines:

** "Lucy, I'm home!"

Added DiffLines:

** In "The Girls Want to Go To A Nightclub," Lucy and Ethel lie that they have dates to make an excuse to go without their husbands. In the twenty-first century, they'd be able to go on their own without needing a date.
** "Job Switching" has the inciting incident where Ricky tells off Lucy for emptying their shared bank account at the hair salon. He and Fred start complaining about their wives spending their wages; Lucy and Ethel naturally take offense. Women at the time couldn't hold their own bank accounts, but with changing times Lucy could have a separate account and that would have avoided the problem.
** On that note, at an employment agency, the man helping Lucy and Ethel find jobs doesn't ask for their resumes as they get into a DuckSeasonRabbitSeason argument. That might have avoided the candy fiasco if they had shown up with papers for their skills.


* ValuesDissonance:
** Being made in TheFifties, this would be a given.

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* ValuesDissonance:
**
ValuesDissonance: Being made in TheFifties, this would be a given.

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