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** Knox kissing Chris on the forehead while she's asleep. It's often forgotten he's incredibly drunk and therefore not exactly thinking rationally - and he apologises to her for it.

to:

** Knox kissing Chris on the forehead while she's asleep. It's often forgotten he's incredibly drunk and therefore not exactly thinking rationally - and he apologises to her for it.



* ValuesDissonance: Knox kissing Chris on the head when she is sleeping at the party, as such an action is often a precursor to rape in such situations and fits the definition of sexual assault. There's some DeliberateValuesDissonance here as well - as the action would be seen as charmingly romantic for the time (it's seen in the film ''Film/NowVoyager'' too).

to:

* ValuesDissonance: ValuesDissonance:
**
Knox kissing Chris on the head when she is sleeping at the party, as such an action is often a precursor to rape in such situations and fits the definition of sexual assault. There's some DeliberateValuesDissonance here as well - as the action would be seen as charmingly romantic for the time (it's seen in the film ''Film/NowVoyager'' too).too).
*** The portrayal of Chris in general is passé from a modern perspective. I mean, it’s very cliche to have the LoveInterest be blond, a cheerleader, [[SatelliteLoveInterest and completely defined by her relationship to the protagonist.]]
** Charlie’s new identity as “Nuwanda” is unlikely to get through in modern times too.


* RonTheDeathEater: People tend to go overboard with Mr Keating's 'inappropriate' teaching methods. It's often forgotten that he only encourages them to think for themselves and learn something while also enjoying his class. He doesn't encourage the Dead Poets' Society, and the kids do that on their own. When the kids start outright rule-breaking, he reprimands Charlie and reminds him that "carpe diem" is not an excuse to do stupid things. He also gives Neil legitimately good advice when he's angsting about the play - telling him to talk to his father and explain his problem. Neil lies to him and in fact ignores his advice.

to:

* RonTheDeathEater: People tend to go overboard with Mr Keating's 'inappropriate' teaching methods. It's often forgotten that he only encourages them to think for themselves and learn something while also enjoying his class. He doesn't encourage them to all become artists and stresses that becoming doctors, lawyers, bankers, etc. are all noble pursuits and absolutely necessary to sustain life. He doesn't encourage the Dead Poets' Society, and the kids do that on their own. When the kids start outright rule-breaking, he reprimands Charlie and reminds him that "carpe diem" is not an excuse to do stupid things. He also gives Neil legitimately good advice when he's angsting about the play - telling him to talk to his father and explain his problem. Neil lies to him and in fact ignores his advice.


** Neil does, in fact, [[Series/{{House}} end up as a doctor]].

to:

** Neil does, in fact, [[Series/{{House}} end up as a doctor]]. Also, [[Film/MuchAdoAboutNothing1993 this wouldn't be the last time he did Shakespeare]].

Added DiffLines:

* GeniusBonus: Neil playing Puck in ''Theatre/AMidsummerNightsDream'' is actually rather fitting for his role in the story. Puck is known for walking in several different worlds, influencing many different figures and yet being master of none of them. Neil likewise is TheAce who is master of his classes, his friendships, extracurricular activities and eventually acting too, but ultimately becomes master of none of them either. Like Puck, he's also under the control of an authority figure, and follows the wrong instructions to shake up the status quo.


* AlternateAesopInterpretation:
** One could argue that the message of the film is actually about finding a ''balance'' between thinking for yourself and knowing when to follow the rules. Charlie's pranks result in him getting paddled [[spoiler: and later expelled]] even after he's warned about misbehaving just for the sake of it.
** Does the film validate Knox's attempts to pursue Chris? The other characters roll their eyes at his actions, and Chris tells him she finds his excessive courting of her infuriating (whether she likes him back is irrelevant; she's telling him to stop embarrassing her) and it only ends on a MaybeEverAfter. Chris doesn't show interest in Knox until after he stops doing such extreme things and simply invites her to the play with him. She liked him before he started going to extremes, suggesting that the Aesop here is that he should have just asked her out in the first place to get to know her better.



** Was Keating an irresponsible teacher for going against the school's values and rules despite the consequences, or was he doing the students a favor by trying to open their minds and broaden their perspectives?
** We are clearly supposed to hate Neil's Dad. Yes he is very demanding and controlling. But bear in mind that when he was Neil's age it would've been right at the start of the Great Depression. Neil states at one point that his family is not as wealthy as most of the other kids and his dad points out that he never had the opportunities that Neil does. So in other words he probably had to work very hard to provide a decent life for his family and would like to see future generations of the family live a good life as well. His father also probably fought in the war. So it is somewhat understandable that he doesn't want everything he's worked for ruined by Neil's dream to be an actor.
* BaseBreakingCharacter: Keating is a polarizing character. Some viewers feel Keating ''was'' an irresponsible teacher, encouraging the students to break the school rules when in so doing it could get them in trouble but would be unlikely to rebound on him and he tried to censor ideas that he didn't agree with, ripping out the book introduction. Others feel that the value of broadening the students' perspective and encouraging them to enter adult life with a different attitude than that endorsed by the school was in the long run worth the short-term risk of being disciplined by the school.

to:

** Was Keating an irresponsible teacher for going against the school's values and rules despite the consequences, or was he doing the students a favor by trying to open their minds and broaden their perspectives?
perspectives? Notably he reprimands the students for doing anything that breaks the rules (he has no idea about the society; the kids do that on their own). In fact when he tells Charlie not to pull any more pranks, Charlie actually ''listens'' to him.
** We are clearly supposed to hate Neil's Dad. Yes he is very demanding and controlling. But bear in mind that when he was Neil's age it would've been right at the start of the Great Depression. Neil states at one point that his family is not as wealthy as most of the other kids and his dad points out that he never had the opportunities that Neil does. So in other words he probably had to work very hard to provide a decent life for his family and would like to see future generations of the family live a good life as well. His father also probably fought in the war. So it is somewhat understandable that he doesn't want everything he's worked for ruined by Neil's dream to be an actor. \n Of course he could be a textbook emotional abuser, using "everything he's worked for" as an excuse to micromanage his son's life despite his obvious unhappiness. He seems to be more worried about how everything will [[ItsAllAboutMe affect him]].
* AwardSnub: Ethan Hawke's layered performance as an anxious teenager who [[spoiler: has to deal with the suicide of his best friend]] and Robert Sean Leonard as an abuse victim [[spoiler: who is driven to suicide]]? Neither were nominated at the Oscars in the Supporting Actor category.
* BaseBreakingCharacter: Keating is a polarizing character. Some viewers feel Keating ''was'' an irresponsible teacher, encouraging the students to break the school rules when in so doing it could get them in trouble trouble[[note]]He does however draw a distinction between thinking for yourself and obvious misbehaving, such as telling Charlie that his stunt with the newspaper was irresponsible, and advising Neil to actually talk to his father instead of sneaking around.[[/note]] but would be unlikely to rebound on him and he tried to censor ideas that he didn't agree with, ripping out the book introduction. Others feel that the value of broadening the students' perspective and encouraging them to enter adult life with a different attitude than that endorsed by the school was in the long run worth the short-term risk of being disciplined by the school.



** Neil's father [[spoiler:driving his son to suicide, albeit inadvertently]].

to:

** Neil's father [[spoiler:driving his son to suicide, albeit inadvertently]]. And he arguably crosses it again when [[spoiler: rather than owning his responsibility for the suicide, he persecutes Mr Keating for it - which gets Charlie expelled too]].



* RetroactiveRecognition: Those who watched ''{{Series/House}}'' before seeing this movie might be surprised to see Wilson as a 17-year-old prep school student.

to:

* RetroactiveRecognition: NeverLiveItDown:
** Knox kissing Chris on the forehead while she's asleep. It's often forgotten he's incredibly drunk and therefore not exactly thinking rationally - and he apologises to her for it.
** Mr Keating encouraging the students to rip out to poetry book's introduction is often held against him.
* OlderThanTheyThink: The subplot of a strict 1950s father forbidding his son from starring in a play [[spoiler: and eventually driving him to suicide]] can be found in ''Film/TeaAndSympathy'' - which is also set at a prestigious private school, and said boy gets encouragement from a faculty member who doesn't fit in. Of course in the former, the father is worried that his son might be gay [[spoiler: and the suicide is averted]].
* RetroactiveRecognition:
**
Those who watched ''{{Series/House}}'' before seeing this movie might be surprised to see Wilson as a 17-year-old prep school student.student.
** Knox's actor Josh Charles would later win Emmy nominations for ''Series/TheGoodWife''.
* RonTheDeathEater: People tend to go overboard with Mr Keating's 'inappropriate' teaching methods. It's often forgotten that he only encourages them to think for themselves and learn something while also enjoying his class. He doesn't encourage the Dead Poets' Society, and the kids do that on their own. When the kids start outright rule-breaking, he reprimands Charlie and reminds him that "carpe diem" is not an excuse to do stupid things. He also gives Neil legitimately good advice when he's angsting about the play - telling him to talk to his father and explain his problem. Neil lies to him and in fact ignores his advice.



* ValuesDissonance: Knox kissing Chris on the head when she is sleeping at the party, as such an action is often a precursor to rape in such situations and fits the definition of sexual assault.
%%* TheWoobie: Both Neil and Todd.

to:

* ValuesDissonance: Knox kissing Chris on the head when she is sleeping at the party, as such an action is often a precursor to rape in such situations and fits the definition of sexual assault.
%%* TheWoobie: Both
assault. There's some DeliberateValuesDissonance here as well - as the action would be seen as charmingly romantic for the time (it's seen in the film ''Film/NowVoyager'' too).
* ValuesResonance: [[spoiler: Neil's suicide]] is all the more topical as awareness of mental health issues among men became a major talking point in TheNewTens - spurred on ironically enough by the suicide of Creator/RobinWilliams himself.
* TheWoobie:
** Todd is TheUnfavorite who has crippling anxiety and self esteem issues - to the point where he'd rather lie to say he didn't do an assignment than have to speak in front of the class. [[spoiler: Then his best friend kills himself]].
**
Neil and Todd.may be TheAce but he's got a very abusive father who tries to make him feel like shit for wanting something different in life than what he has planned. [[spoiler: After being bullied by him one too many times, he feels that suicide is preferable]].


* WhatCouldHaveBeen: If Neil hadn't committed suicide and graduated from the military academy and Harvard, would he have turned out as grumpy and cynical as his father?
** Even if Neil became a doctor, would he still have received any praise from his dad, or would his accomplishments be cynically dismissed?
* TheWoobie: Both Neil and Todd.

to:

* WhatCouldHaveBeen: If Neil hadn't committed suicide and graduated from the military academy and Harvard, would he have turned out as grumpy and cynical as his father?
** Even if Neil became a doctor, would he still have received any praise from his dad, or would his accomplishments be cynically dismissed?
*
%%* TheWoobie: Both Neil and Todd.


** We are clearly supposed to hate Neil’s Dad. Yes he is very demanding and controlling. But bear in mind that when he was Neil‘s age it would’ve been right at the start of the Great Depression. Neil states at one point that his family is not as wealthy as most of the other kids and his dad points out that he never had the opportunities that Neil does. So in other words he probably had to work very hard to provide a decent life for his family and would like to see future generations of the family live a good life as well. His father also probably fought in the war. So it is somewhat understandable that he doesn’t want everything he’s worked for ruined by Neil’s dream to be an actor.

to:

** We are clearly supposed to hate Neil’s Neil's Dad. Yes he is very demanding and controlling. But bear in mind that when he was Neil‘s Neil's age it would’ve would've been right at the start of the Great Depression. Neil states at one point that his family is not as wealthy as most of the other kids and his dad points out that he never had the opportunities that Neil does. So in other words he probably had to work very hard to provide a decent life for his family and would like to see future generations of the family live a good life as well. His father also probably fought in the war. So it is somewhat understandable that he doesn’t doesn't want everything he’s he's worked for ruined by Neil’s Neil's dream to be an actor.


** Did Nolan fire Keating [[spoiler: after Neil's suicide]] because he honestly believed he was responsible for it? Was it an act of damage control to save the school's reputation? Or did he just use the incident as an excuse to get rid of him and his unorthodox teaching methods? Maybe some combination thereof?

to:

** Did Nolan fire Keating [[spoiler: after [[spoiler:after Neil's suicide]] because he honestly believed he was responsible for it? Was it an act of damage control to save the school's reputation? Or did he just use the incident as an excuse to get rid of him and his unorthodox teaching methods? Maybe some combination thereof?



* ItWasHisSled: [[spoiler:Neil]]'s death.
** Keating gets fired because of it.
* MemeticMutation: The "carpe diem" speech got a ''lot'' of play on Tumblr in the wake of Robin Williams' death.
** Not to mention "O, Captain! My Captain!"

to:

* ItWasHisSled: [[spoiler:Neil]]'s death.
**
death, and Keating gets getting fired because of it.
* MemeticMutation: The "carpe diem" speech got a ''lot'' of play on Tumblr in the wake of Robin Williams' death.
**
death. Not to mention "O, Captain! My Captain!"



* UnintentionallyUnsympathetic: Knox's character arc revolves around trying to win the heart of a pretty girl he met ''once'' and it is framed in a way where the audience is clearly supposed to root for him. Yet his method of courtship towards Chris involves [[DudeShesLikeInacoma kissing her on the forehead while she's sleeping]], showing up unannounced at her school after that incident to recite poetry to her in front of her friends and then hounding her until she agrees to go on a date with him. Knox is supposed to be in a classic "nerd vs JerkJock" love story but he comes across as an aggressive creep who won't take "no" for an answer.

to:

* UnintentionallyUnsympathetic: Knox's character arc revolves around trying to win the heart of a pretty girl he met ''once'' and it is framed in a way where the audience is clearly supposed to root for him. Yet his method of courtship towards Chris involves [[DudeShesLikeInacoma [[DudeShesLikeInAComa kissing her on the forehead while she's sleeping]], showing up unannounced at her school after that incident to recite poetry to her in front of her friends and then hounding her until she agrees to go on a date with him. Knox is supposed to be in a classic "nerd vs JerkJock" love story but he comes across as an aggressive creep who won't take "no" for an answer.

Added DiffLines:

* WhatCouldHaveBeen: If Neil hadn't committed suicide and graduated from the military academy and Harvard, would he have turned out as grumpy and cynical as his father?
** Even if Neil became a doctor, would he still have received any praise from his dad, or would his accomplishments be cynically dismissed?


* UnintentionallyUnsympathetic: Knox's character arc revolves around trying to win the heart of a pretty girl he met ''once'' and it is framed in a way where the audience is clearly supposed to root for him. Yet his method of courtship towards Chris involves [[DudeShesLikeInacoma kissing her on the forehead while she's sleeping]], showing up unannounced at her school after that incident and reciting poetry to her in front of her friends and then hounding her until she agrees to go on a date with him. Knox is supposed to be in a classic "nerd vs JerkJock" love story but he comes across as an aggressive creep who won't take "no" for an answer.

to:

* UnintentionallyUnsympathetic: Knox's character arc revolves around trying to win the heart of a pretty girl he met ''once'' and it is framed in a way where the audience is clearly supposed to root for him. Yet his method of courtship towards Chris involves [[DudeShesLikeInacoma kissing her on the forehead while she's sleeping]], showing up unannounced at her school after that incident and reciting to recite poetry to her in front of her friends and then hounding her until she agrees to go on a date with him. Knox is supposed to be in a classic "nerd vs JerkJock" love story but he comes across as an aggressive creep who won't take "no" for an answer.


* SignatureScene: The ending where the students stand on their desks to salute Keating.



* SignatureScene: The ending where the students stand on their desks to salute Keating.

Added DiffLines:

*UnintentionallyUnsympathetic: Knox's character arc revolves around trying to win the heart of a pretty girl he met ''once'' and it is framed in a way where the audience is clearly supposed to root for him. Yet his method of courtship towards Chris involves [[DudeShesLikeInacoma kissing her on the forehead while she's sleeping]], showing up unannounced at her school after that incident and reciting poetry to her in front of her friends and then hounding her until she agrees to go on a date with him. Knox is supposed to be in a classic "nerd vs JerkJock" love story but he comes across as an aggressive creep who won't take "no" for an answer.


* AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: Did Nolan fire Keating [[spoiler: after Neil's suicide]] because he honestly believed he was responsible for it? Or was it an act of damage control to save the school's reputation? Or did he just use the incident as an excuse to get rid of him and his unorthodox teaching methods?

to:

* AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: AlternativeCharacterInterpretation:
**
Did Nolan fire Keating [[spoiler: after Neil's suicide]] because he honestly believed he was responsible for it? Or was Was it an act of damage control to save the school's reputation? Or did he just use the incident as an excuse to get rid of him and his unorthodox teaching methods?methods? Maybe some combination thereof?



* DeletedScene: Future ''Series/TwinPeaks'' star Lara Flynn Boyle was cast in a bit part as Chet's sister Ginny, but all of her scenes ended up on the cutting room floor, save for a few scenes in which she is glimpsed as a non-speaking extra.
* DesignatedVillain: Principal Nolan has some of this, the movie setting him up as the uber-conformist, stuffy-conservative [[StopHavingFunGuys "Stop Having Fun" Guy]] opposite Mr. Keating's free-spirited CoolTeacher. While he ''is'' a jerk from time to time, most of the time he's just doing his job as principal of the school; the rest of the time, he's espousing beliefs or values that clash with the message of "Carpe Diem", which is hardly ''his'' fault. On the other hand, he clearly believes that the authoritarian structure of the school should be maintained, considers the ridiculous essay about drawing graphs to analyze poetry that Keating condemned as "excrement" to be "excellent" and disciplines Charlie for his silly prank by ''paddling'' him (though it was deemed much more acceptable in 1950s than it is now).
** Remember also that it is a boarding school and Mr. Nolan is not only responsible for them during class time but, during all other times as well. Anyone who is ever gone to a boarding school, even the most progressive ones, knows that they are very strict and everything you do is scrutinized.

to:

* DeletedScene: Future ''Series/TwinPeaks'' star Lara Flynn Boyle was cast in a bit part as Chet's sister Ginny, but all of her scenes ended up on the cutting room floor, save for a few scenes in which she is glimpsed as a non-speaking extra.
* DesignatedVillain: Principal Nolan has some of this, the movie setting him up as the uber-conformist, stuffy-conservative [[StopHavingFunGuys "Stop Having Fun" Guy]] opposite Mr. Keating's free-spirited CoolTeacher. While he ''is'' a jerk from time to time, most of the time he's just doing his job as principal of the school; the rest of the time, he's espousing beliefs or values that clash with the message of "Carpe Diem", which is hardly ''his'' fault. On the other hand, he clearly believes that the authoritarian structure of the school should be maintained, considers the ridiculous essay about drawing graphs to analyze poetry that Keating condemned as "excrement" to be "excellent" and disciplines Charlie for his silly prank by ''paddling'' him (though it him, although [[DeliberateValuesDissonance that was deemed much more acceptable in the 1950s than it is now).
**
now]]. Remember also that it is a boarding school and Mr. Nolan is not only responsible for them during class time but, time, but during all other times as well. [[TruthInTelevision Anyone who is has ever gone to a boarding school, even the most progressive ones, knows that they are very strict and everything you do is scrutinized. scrutinized.]]



student.

Added DiffLines:

student.
* ValuesDissonance: Knox kissing Chris on the head when she is sleeping at the party, as such an action is often a precursor to rape in such situations and fits the definition of sexual assault.

Added DiffLines:

** Remember also that it is a boarding school and Mr. Nolan is not only responsible for them during class time but, during all other times as well. Anyone who is ever gone to a boarding school, even the most progressive ones, knows that they are very strict and everything you do is scrutinized.

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