Follow TV Tropes

Following

History WritersCannotDoMath / LiveActionTV

Go To


Added DiffLines:

* ''Series/{{Big Bad Beetleborgs}}'': Josh Baldwin only exists because of this trope; the show already had four main characters who were Beetleborg fans and worked at the comic store (Drew, Jo, Roland, and Heather)-exactly one for every main Beetleborg plus the White Blaster. Once the writers realized their mistake, they lampshaded it in the form of Heather's leg getting broken during Shadowborg's initial attack.


* You think a show that relies so heavily on {{Flashback}}s and [[TimeShiftedActor Time Shifted Actors]] as ''Series/ColdCase'' would be free of this, right? Wrong! The conflicting data about the age of the most senior detective, Will Jeffries, was eventually {{lampshade|Hanging}}d in sixth season episode "November 22nd":

to:

* You think a show that relies so heavily on {{Flashback}}s and [[TimeShiftedActor Time Shifted Time-Shifted Actors]] as ''Series/ColdCase'' would be free of this, right? Wrong! The conflicting data about the age of the most senior detective, Will Jeffries, was eventually {{lampshade|Hanging}}d in sixth season episode "November 22nd":


Added DiffLines:

*** To explain: If Rose is 19 in March 2005, then she must have been born between March 1984 and March 1985. If her father died in November 1987, then she ''should'' be a toddler aged either two or three. If her father died when she was six months old, than he should have died between September 1984 and September 1985. Rose being six months old in November 1987 would mean she was born in May 1987 and make her 17 and two months away from her 18[-[[superscript:th]]-] birthday in March 2005.


** In [[Recap/StargateSG1S4E6WindowOfOpportunity Window of Opportunity]], while hitting golf balls through the Stargate, Teal'c comments that Alaris, the planet they dialed was several billion miles from Earth. That would put Alaris somewhere near Pluto. Heck, a light year is about 5.8 trillion miles and the closest star to our sun is Proxima Centauri, which is 4.2 light years away.

to:

** In [[Recap/StargateSG1S4E6WindowOfOpportunity Window "Window of Opportunity]], Opportunity"]], while hitting golf balls through the Stargate, Teal'c comments that Alaris, the planet they dialed was dialed, is several billion miles from Earth. That would put Alaris somewhere near Pluto. Heck, a light year is about 5.8 trillion miles and the closest star to our sun is Proxima Centauri, which is 4.2 light years away.

Added DiffLines:

** In [[Recap/StargateSG1S4E6WindowOfOpportunity Window of Opportunity]], while hitting golf balls through the Stargate, Teal'c comments that Alaris, the planet they dialed was several billion miles from Earth. That would put Alaris somewhere near Pluto. Heck, a light year is about 5.8 trillion miles and the closest star to our sun is Proxima Centauri, which is 4.2 light years away.

Added DiffLines:

*** In "Rapture", Sisko says that a pillar is 11 meters tall, or about 36 feet tall. He then asks for a 75% scale reconstruction on the holodeck, which should be about 8 meters, or about 27 feet tall, but it's nowhere near that.


** There is an official mathematical formula for calculating how fast warp speeds actually are (different ones for TOS and TNG eras). However, if you look at the instances where distance, warp factor and time to arrival are all mentioned within the various series, it seems like [[TravelingAtTheSpeedOfPlot none of the writers bother with the formula]]. One of the more glaring examples is the ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise'' pilot "[[Recap/StarTrekEnterpriseS01E01E02BrokenBow Broken Bow]]", where the ship is said to be limited to warp 5 but can reach the Klingon homeworld in a week, which ought to put Qo'noS somewhere in the Sol system's Oort Cloud by the TNG scale. (It's further but still way too close to make sense by the TOS scale.) This one's worse because of an offhand comment earlier in the episode that ''does'' sync up perfectly with the TNG scale.

to:

** There is an official mathematical formula for calculating how fast warp speeds actually are (different ones for TOS and TNG eras). However, if you look at the instances where distance, warp factor and time to arrival are all mentioned within the various series, it seems like [[TravelingAtTheSpeedOfPlot none of the writers bother with the formula]]. One of the more glaring examples is the ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise'' pilot "[[Recap/StarTrekEnterpriseS01E01E02BrokenBow Broken Bow]]", where the ship is said to be limited to warp 5 (on paper; in practice, they have yet to reach 4.5) but can reach the Klingon homeworld in a week, four days, which ought to put Qo'noS somewhere in the Sol system's Oort Cloud by the TNG scale. (It's further but still way too close to make sense by the TOS scale.) This one's worse because of an offhand comment earlier in the episode that ''does'' sync up perfectly with the TNG scale. (At the stated speed, it would take 19 days to reach Alpha Centauri, our system's nearest neighbor.)

Added DiffLines:

** Regardless of the series, the usual warp calculations put the stars hours or even days apart - yet they stream by the main viewscreen as though you were driving through a snowstorm.


** Hell, the very premise of Voyager is an excersise in this trope as well as ContinuitySnarl. Based on all pre-Voyager calculations of how fast warps are, their trip home should have taken a maximum of around 7 years, not 70, and maybe even around 4 weeks.

to:

** Hell, the very premise of Voyager is an excersise exercise in this trope as well as ContinuitySnarl. Based on all pre-Voyager calculations of how fast warps are, their trip home should have taken a maximum of around 7 years, not 70, and maybe even around 4 weeks.

Added DiffLines:

** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS37E7Kerblam "Kerblam!"]]: Kandoka requires 10% of the workforce to be human (the rest can be automated). The antagonist's stated justification for his act of terrorism is that it means only 10% of humans get to have a job (the rest are unemployed). Those are two completely unrelated quantities (10% of my doughnuts are chocolate: does this mean that 10% of all my chocolate goodies are doughnuts?); the fact that the hole remains wide open and unacknowledged even by the Doctor herself suggests the writers didn't notice.


* Series/{{Andromeda}} once used the term "nano-millennia" to describe how long the ship's AI was trapped in a box. It was apparently meant to convey a great deal of subjective time based on how fast a computer processes things. However, the prefix nano means one billionth. From that, one "nano-millennium" is only about 31.5 seconds.

to:

* Series/{{Andromeda}} ''Series/{{Andromeda}}'' once used the term "nano-millennia" to describe how long the ship's AI was trapped in a box. It was apparently meant to convey a great deal of subjective time based on how fast a computer processes things. However, the prefix nano means one billionth. From that, one "nano-millennium" is only about 31.5 seconds.


Added DiffLines:

** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E742 "42"]]: Averted in the "What's the next number in the sequence?" puzzle [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Happy_number#Happy_primes happy primes]] [[ShownTheirWork are a thing]]. However, it's also invoked: there are simpler solutions to this puzzle (421 if the differences between the numbers go up by 18 each time, 439 if the differences double each time), and with this kind of puzzle, the right answer should always be the simplest one or else the puzzle is no longer fair.


* ''{{Series/Merlin}}'' reveals two illegitimate children from Gorlois' wife Vivienne. The first of whom is Morgause, who was smuggled out of Camelot and declared stillborn to be kept secret. The second is [[spoiler:Morgana herself]] and Uther is the father, which poses problems since she and Arthur are roughly the same age -- and Uther either cheated on Igraine while she was pregnant with Arthur or else used magic to conceive Arthur almost immediately after his affair with Vivienne. Morgause was kept secret, which is considerably harder for the ''mother'' to do, and requires her husband to have been away from the kingdom for long enough for Vivienne to have her affair and carry the pregnancy to term. All the while Gorlois was away for long enough not to notice any of this -- and [[spoiler:Morgana's]] conception has to have happened recently enough before his return that the child could be passed off as his.

to:

* ''{{Series/Merlin}}'' ''{{Series/Merlin|2008}}'' reveals two illegitimate children from Gorlois' wife Vivienne. The first of whom is Morgause, who was smuggled out of Camelot and declared stillborn to be kept secret. The second is [[spoiler:Morgana herself]] and Uther is the father, which poses problems since she and Arthur are roughly the same age -- and Uther either cheated on Igraine while she was pregnant with Arthur or else used magic to conceive Arthur almost immediately after his affair with Vivienne. Morgause was kept secret, which is considerably harder for the ''mother'' to do, and requires her husband to have been away from the kingdom for long enough for Vivienne to have her affair and carry the pregnancy to term. All the while Gorlois was away for long enough not to notice any of this -- and [[spoiler:Morgana's]] conception has to have happened recently enough before his return that the child could be passed off as his.


* ''Series/{{Charmed}}''

to:

* ''Series/{{Charmed}}''''Series/Charmed1998''



** In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E8FathersDay "Father's Day"]], Rose travels back to November 1987, where we see her as a baby of about six months old (according to series 2's [[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E5RiseOfTheCybermen "Rise of the Cybermen"]]) -- except there are repeated references to her being 19 in her first season, which starts in March 2005.

to:

** In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E8FathersDay "Father's Day"]], Rose travels back to November 1987, where we see her as a baby of about six months old (according to series 2's [[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E5RiseOfTheCybermen "Rise of the Cybermen"]]) -- except there are repeated references to her being 19 in her first season, which starts in March 2005.

Added DiffLines:

* ''Series/{{Haven}}'' was always vague on how old exactly Nathan and Duke were when the Troubles last came in 1983, 27 years before the start of the series in 2010. Based on the stories they tell, they were somewhere around 9 or 10, as Duke has clear memories of his father, who died when the Troubles last came (putting their birthdates around 1973-74). However, the episode with their high school ClassReunion implies they graduated somewhere around 1995, meaning that unless they took the long route to graduation, something doesn't add up.


* ''Series/{{Supertrain}}'': The titular train has a top speed of 250 mph and cruises at 190 mph, but takes 36 hours to cross the United States. That puts its speed at about 80 mph.

to:

* ''Series/{{Supertrain}}'': The titular train ''Series/{{Supertrain}}'' has a top speed of 250 mph and cruises at 190 mph, but takes 36 hours to cross the United States. That puts its speed at about 80 mph.


* ''Series/Supertrain'': The titular train has a top speed of 250 mph and cruises at 190 mph, but takes 36 hours to cross the United States. That puts its speed at about 80 mph.

to:

* ''Series/Supertrain'': ''Series/{{Supertrain}}'': The titular train has a top speed of 250 mph and cruises at 190 mph, but takes 36 hours to cross the United States. That puts its speed at about 80 mph.

Showing 15 edit(s) of 18

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report