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** If an NPC Trainer switches Pokémon, the experience distribution can become flaky. For example, you send out Pokémon A while your opponent sends out Pokémon X. You immediately switch to Pokémon B, while your opponent switches to Pokémon Y. Pokémon B defeats Pokémon Y. The NPC trainer then sends Pokémon X back out. Pokémon B defeats Pokémon X. In all future games, Pokémon A will still get a share of experience after the defeat of Pokémon X. Here, however, Pokémon B will get 100% of the experience. As very few NPC trainers are programmed for switching, you may never run into this, but it is weird nonetheless.


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* EasyLevelsHardBosses: The latter half of the game, in line with SequelDifficultySpike below. Your team can include all three ''Red/Blue'' starters giving you heavy hitters with great type coverage, while the levels of wild Pokémon and those of most [=NPC=] trainers remain the same as they were in ''Red/Blue''. However, the last four gym leaders all have their Pokémon levels boosted into the ''[=50s=]'', which make for some very challenging battles.


* CrutchCharacter: You can now catch Mankey on Route 22 near Viridian City whose fighting type moves will help you make short work of Brock. Mankey can also dispatch the Geodude encountered in Mt. Moon with ease. Unfortunately, the Fighting-type isn't particularly helpful after that. It's weaknesses to the broken Psychic-type and ubiquitous Flying-type, as well as the fact that Poison-types resist it (which are plentiful among Team Rocket members) leave it in the dust.

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* CrutchCharacter: CrutchCharacter:
**
You can now catch Mankey on Route 22 near Viridian City whose fighting type moves will help you make short work of Brock. Mankey can also dispatch the Geodude encountered in Mt. Moon with ease. Unfortunately, the Fighting-type isn't particularly helpful after that. It's weaknesses to the broken Psychic-type and ubiquitous Flying-type, as well as the fact that Poison-types resist it (which are plentiful among Team Rocket members) leave it in the dust.dust.
** Butterfree again, but it gets even more of an advantage here over ''Red/Blue'' in that it learns Confusion upon evolving at lv. 10, rather than having to grind it two more levels to 12 with only Tackle as a damaging move. Though not directly weak to its Psychic-typing, Confusion can take advantage of Brock's Pokémon's weak Special stat giving you another means to easily dispatch them. Like the originals, its usefulness still peters out around the middle of the game as you build and evolve your team.



** Pikachu himself. Having access to Thundershock, a STAB move and one that inflicts paralysis about 10% of the time, right at the start means that Pikachu can steamroller most of the early game, with the sole exception of Brock. In comparison, the three starters from ''Red and Blue'' need to be at least level 8 to get their first STAB move.

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** Pikachu himself. itself. Having access to Thundershock, a STAB move and one that inflicts paralysis about 10% of the time, right at the start means that Pikachu can steamroller most of the early game, with the sole exception of Brock. In comparison, the three starters from ''Red ''Red'' and Blue'' ''Blue'' need to be at least level 8 to get their first STAB move.


* ObviousRulePatch: Some UnwinnableByMistake scenarios that were possible in ''Red and Blue'' had an escape hatch added in.
** The Safari Zone lets you get in with insufficient money (and even ''no'' money, once ever), to make sure you can get Strength and Surf.
** Lorelei's Dewgong has its own AI routine added to prevent you from getting Rage-locked.

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* ObviousRulePatch: ObviousRulePatch:
**
Some UnwinnableByMistake scenarios that were possible in ''Red and Blue'' had an escape hatch added in.
** *** The Safari Zone lets you get in with insufficient money (and even ''no'' money, once ever), to make sure you can get Strength and Surf.
** *** Lorelei's Dewgong has its own AI routine added to prevent you from getting Rage-locked.Rage-locked.
** The interaction with the Old Man in Viridian City who shows you how to catch Pokémon is changed. He can no longer be used to trigger TheMissingno glitch.



* SequelDifficultyDrop:
** Pikachu is a DiscOneNuke starter who gets a STAB move right off the bat that can paralyze opponents and is a "Special" move which can one-or-two-hit KO nearly all early-game opponents. LevelGrinding is extremely easy if you focus on Pidgey and Spearow, who are weak to Electric-type attacks. It can steamroll everything in the first quarter or so of the game besides Brock's gym and the Geodude in Mt. Moon.
** Viridian Forest, the generation's NoobCave, isn't particularly difficult to begin with, but the lack of Weedle in ''Yellow'' makes it even easier as there is no longer anything within that can poison your Pokémon.
** Each of Brock's Pokémon will resist or are outright immune to anything a reasonably leveled Pikachu can hit them with. However, both are reduced in level by two (Geodude to 10 from 12 and Onix to 12 from 14). Additionally, you can now catch the Fighting-type Mankey on Route 22 while the Nidoran caught in the same area learn the Fighting-type move Double Kick at a ''much'' earlier level.
** You can acquire all three ''Red/Blue'' starters, giving you great type coverage while their fully evolved forms are some of the strongest of their type available in the game.
** Your rival's team as League Champion has the same levels as ''Red/Blue'', but features several objectively weaker Pokémon. Rhydon is replaced with Sandslash, Gyarados with Cloyster, and Arcanine with Ninetails.



** Possibly due to this being the sole installment in the mobile ''Pokemon'' games to give you the opportunity to obtain all three starter Pokemon from that generation without trading or using glitches, they've ramped up the difficulty of some parts of the game.
** Because your starter is a Pikachu, you're likely going to have a much tougher time dealing with Brock than in ''Red and Blue''. Fortunately, Nidoran learns Double Kick at a lower level than ''Red and Blue'', you now have the option to pick up a Mankey on Route 22, and they dropped the levels of the Pokemon of Brock and his Junior Trainer down by two each (they still have the same Pokemon as ''Red/Blue'' and the anime, but Geodude is now Lv. 10 instead of 12 and Onix Lv. 12 instead of 14.


* CrutchCharacter: You can now catch Mankey on Route 22 near Viridian City whose fighting type moves will help you make short work of Brock. Mankey can also dispatch the Geodude encountered in Mt. Moon with ease. Unfortunately, the Fighting-type isn't particularly helpful after that. It's weaknesses to the broken Psychic-type and ubiquitous Flying-type, as well as the fact that Poison-types resist it (which are plentiful among Team Rocket members) leave it in the dust.



* DiscOneNuke: Pikachu himself. Having access to Thundershock, a STAB move and one that inflicts paralysis about 10% of the time, right at the start means that Pikachu can steamroller most of the early game, with the sole exception of Brock. In comparison, the three starters from ''Red and Blue'' need to be at least level 8 to get their first STAB move.

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* DiscOneNuke: DiscOneNuke:
**
Pikachu himself. Having access to Thundershock, a STAB move and one that inflicts paralysis about 10% of the time, right at the start means that Pikachu can steamroller most of the early game, with the sole exception of Brock. In comparison, the three starters from ''Red and Blue'' need to be at least level 8 to get their first STAB move.move.
** Nidoran once again. In an upgrade from ''Red and Blue'', they learn Double-Kick at a much earlier level, giving them a Fighting-type move to help with Brock and to get you through Mt. Moon.


* SelfDamagingAttackBackfire:
** Confused Pokémon have a 50% chance of damaging themselves while trying to attack.
** The moves Jump Kick and High Jump Kick deal damage to the user if they miss.



* UnitConfusion: The Camper in Brock's gym tells you that "you're light years from facing Brock!" After you beat him, he'll acknowledge the mistake.



%% ** Brock, which is sort of a given in his role as the 1st gym leader. Other than your starter, every Pokémon you can catch up to this point are ComMons who will have difficulty dealing damage to Brock's Rock-type Pokémon. Even if you chose Bulbasaur or Squirtle as your starter, you'll need to [[LevelGrinding Level Grind]] them a bit before they can reliably sweep both of Brock's Pokémon. And because a [[NPCRoadblock NPC will block you from advancing past Pewter City before beating Brock]], you're stuck level grinding on only the weak ComMons and Bug Catchers.


* MutuallyExclusivePartyMembers: Without trading them in from another game or using exploits, you can only have one of the starters, one of the Hitmonlee/Hitmonchan duo, and one of the Fossil Pokémon.
* NewSkillAsReward: Hidden Machines ([=HMs=]) are each given out as rewards, and each allows you to perform a new action outside of battle. HM01 is given by the sick captain of the SS Anne, HM02 is given by a woman who lives in an out-of-the-way house, HM03 is given for making it to the final lodge in the Safari Zone, HM04 is given for returning the Safari Zone warden's missing gold dentures, and HM05 is given by one of Professor Oak's aides for catching a specific amount of Pokémon.



* NoFairCheating: If you use a glitch to spawn and catch a Mew in the Virtual Console version, you will be unable to transfer it to newer gen games through Pokémon Bank.



* PeninsulaOfPowerLeveling: In Pokémon Tower, there is a "purified" square which instantly heals all of your Pokémon. Best of all, it can be used an unlimited number of times, making a great spot for mid-game LevelGrinding.

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* PeninsulaOfPowerLeveling: In Pokémon Tower, there is a "purified" "[[PlaceOfProtection purified]]" square which instantly heals all of your Pokémon. Best of all, it can be used an unlimited number of times, making a great spot for mid-game LevelGrinding.


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* PlaceOfProtection: A non-possessed Channeler in Pokémon Tower has "purified" a square which which instantly heal your Mons if you step inside. The best part is that it can be used as many times as you want, making it a [[PeninsulaOfPowerLeveling great spot]] for some mid-game level-grinding.


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* RivalFinalBoss: Quite possibly the "Crowning Example" in gaming. The page image even comes from the remakes.


* EarlyGameHell: The most difficult part of the game is the early part up until you beat Misty, the 2nd gym leader. In terms of Pokémon, you're limited to your starter, CrutchCharacter bug Pokémon (if you bother to [[LevelGrinding Level Grind]] them), and ComMons such as the early game bird Pokémon and Rattata. There are also only a limited number of trainer battles, meaning you'll be low on money and will have to grind mostly against weak wild Pokémon. Viridian Forest isn't too difficult if you start with Charmander or teach a Pidgey/Spearow Gust/Peck, but you run the constant risk of being poisoned by Weedle's Poison Sting. Brock will be a breeze if you start with Squirtle or Bulbasaur, but will be more challenging to a Charmander trainer (though a few Embers each can floor both of Brock's Pokémon with little trouble as long as you don't damage Onix while the latter is using Bide). Then you get to Mt. Moon, a labyrinthine multi-level cave full of trainers, Geodude (who will resist the Normal-type moves most of your low-level Mons will be using at this point but given its low Special can still be floored by an Ember or two if you have Charmander and will absolutely go down to the conveniently-placed TM12 that you can teach certain of said low-level Mons, including Rattata, Jigglypuff, and Clefairy) and Zubat (which are fast enough that you might not be able to flee and can inflict Confusion so you'll hurt yourself half the time trying to damage them). Eventually, you get through Mt. Moon... only to encounter your Rival in Cerulean City, followed by several trainers on a bridge that must all be defeated to move forward to Bill's House, which you need to visit to leave the city and continue with the game. Finally, you battle Misty, whose Starmie is ''extremely'' powerful for the part of the game you fight it in due to its high stats. Survive all of that and the game then opens up, becoming much friendlier and giving you more options in terms of Pokémon to catch, trainers to battle, and places to explore.

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* EarlyGameHell: The most difficult part of the game is the early part up until you beat Misty, the 2nd gym leader. In terms of Pokémon, you're limited to your starter, CrutchCharacter bug Pokémon (if you bother to [[LevelGrinding Level Grind]] them), and ComMons such as the early game bird Pokémon and Rattata. There are also only a limited number of trainer battles, meaning you'll be low on money and will have to grind mostly against weak wild Pokémon. Viridian Forest isn't too difficult if you start with Charmander or teach a Pidgey/Spearow Gust/Peck, but you run the constant risk of being poisoned by Weedle's Poison Sting. Brock will be a breeze if you start with Squirtle or Bulbasaur, but will be more challenging to a Charmander trainer (though a few Embers each can floor both of Brock's Pokémon with little trouble as long as you don't damage Onix while the latter is using Bide). Then you get to Mt. Moon, a labyrinthine multi-level cave full of trainers, Geodude (who will resist the Normal-type moves most of your low-level Mons will be using at this point but given its low Special point[[note]] Though, like Brock's Geodude, can still be floored taken out by an Ember or two if you have a Charmander and will absolutely go down to the conveniently-placed TM12 that using Ember. Their difficulty can be also be mitigated if you can teach certain pick up [=TM12=] (Water Gun) inside of said low-level Mons, including Mt. Moon itself which can be taught to Rattata, Jigglypuff, and Clefairy) Clefairy. Though their lack of STAB damage means they probably won't be able to one-shot the Geodude with it, it gives you another option.[[/note]]) and Zubat (which are fast enough that you might not be able to flee and can inflict Confusion so you'll hurt yourself half the time trying to damage them). Eventually, you get through Mt. Moon... only to encounter your Rival in Cerulean City, followed by several trainers on a bridge that must all be defeated to move forward to Bill's House, which you need to visit to leave the city and continue with the game. Finally, you battle Misty, whose Starmie is ''extremely'' powerful for the part of the game you fight it in due to its high stats. Survive all of that and the game then opens up, becoming much friendlier and giving you more options in terms of Pokémon to catch, trainers to battle, and places to explore.



** The box art themselves are also different compared to the later entries. Nearly every game in the main series will always show off a legendary Pokemon. Here, the starter Pokemon that you can pick from are shown on the box; Charizard for ''Red/Fire Red'', Blastoise for ''Blue'', and Venusaur for ''Green/Leaf Green''. Pikachu would go on to represent ''Yellow''.



** The box art themselves are also different compared to the later entries. Nearly every game in the main series will always show off a legendary Pokemon. Here, the starter Pokemon that you can pick from are shown on the box; Charizard for ''Red/Fire Red'', Blastoise for ''Blue'', and Venusaur for ''Green/Leaf Green''. Pikachu would go on to represent ''Yellow''.



* EliteFour: The TropeNamer and, at least in the west, the TropeCodifier. They serve as the [[FinalBoss Final]] BossRush in the game.



* EvilTowerOfOminousness: Pokémon Tower, which serves as a cemetary for deceased Pokémon and is full of ghosts, possessed trainers, and Team Rocket.



* ForcedLevelGrinding: As EarlyGameHell mentioned above, a lot of the game will be spent grinding if you want to stand a chance against Sabrina and Koga, especially if you're playing ''[[SequelDifficultySpike Yellow Version]]''.

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* ForcedLevelGrinding: ForcedLevelGrinding:
**
As EarlyGameHell mentioned above, a lot of the game will be spent grinding if you want to stand a chance against Sabrina and Koga, especially if you're playing ''[[SequelDifficultySpike Yellow Version]]''.Version]]''.
** There is a major DifficultySpike between the 8th gym and the Elite Four, which will almost certainly require grinding each of your Mons 8-10 levels in order to have a chance.


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* MerchantCity: Celadon City, which has a multi-floored department store that sells a far greater variety of goods than the Pokémarts in other towns, including some goods (such as the Evolutionary Stones) which cna only be purchased there.

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* CreepyCemetery: Pokémon Tower is a massive cemetery tower where people all over pay their respects to Pokemon who have passed on. Team Rocket infiltrates the tower, disturbing the restless spirits, one of them a mother Marowak who was killed by Team Rocket Grunts.


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* CriticalAnnoyance:
** Low health. It even affects the cries of the Pokémon you are sending out, since the channels overlap.
** Walking while a poisoned Pokémon is in your party causes an irritating sound to play, making sure you know.


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* DepthPerplexion: Being a classic ThreeQuartersView game, you cannot walk behind anything, including tall buildings.


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* DevelopersRoom: There is one in Celadon City.


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* EasyLevelTrick: Erika's gym can easily be defeated by any Grass/Poison dual-typed Pokémon thanks to the AIBreaker described above. Every trainer in her gym will attempt to spam Poison-inflicting moves due to your Mon's part Grass-type, but your Mon will be immune due to it's part Poison-type.


* AbsurdlyYouthfulMother: Or grandfather, in this case. Professor Oak's age is given as 47. He already has a grandson (Blue) who is 11, and a grandaughter (Daisy) who is at least a few years older. This means either Oak, his child who is Blue/Daisy's parent, or both, had children before the age of 18.

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* AbsurdlyYouthfulMother: Or grandfather, in this case. Professor Oak's age is given as 47. He already has a grandson (Blue) who is 11, and a grandaughter (Daisy) who is at least a few years older. This Mathematically speaking, this means either Oak, his child who is Blue/Daisy's parent, or both, had children before the age of 18.



* AnythingYouCanDoICanDoBetter: Played with regarding your rival throughout the game. He's always a step ahead, having explored more, having caught more Pokémon, even [[spoiler:becoming ''Champion'']] before you. Ultimately Subverted, as you'll need to defeat him in almost every instance in order to advance in the game, proving your skill as the superior trainer.



* BleakLevel: Pokémon Tower is a graveyard for Pokémon with {{Creepypasta}}-inspiring music, possessed trainers, undead Pokémon, and the ghost of a Pokémon that was killed by people.

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* BleakLevel: BleakLevel:
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Pokémon Tower is a graveyard for Pokémon with {{Creepypasta}}-inspiring music, possessed trainers, undead Pokémon, and the ghost of a Pokémon that was killed by people.people.
** Cinnabar Mansion is a blasted, decrepit space full of rubble, Poison and Fire-type Pokémon (along with Rattata and Raticate), and is inhabited only by Burglars and rogue Scientists using the basement laboratory. It is also implied to be where Mewtwo was cloned and tortured, with its escape causing the damage.


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* CantDropTheHero: Averted, perhaps surprisingly given the number of other classic RPG tropes the game plays straight. You're free to stuff your starter in the PC as soon as you've caught one other Pokémon, and can even release it into the wild, never to be see again.

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* AbsurdlyYouthfulMother: Or grandfather, in this case. Professor Oak's age is given as 47. He already has a grandson (Blue) who is 11, and a grandaughter (Daisy) who is at least a few years older. This means either Oak, his child who is Blue/Daisy's parent, or both, had children before the age of 18.


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* AcrophobicBird: Despite having Flying as a secondary type, neither Charizard nor Dragonite can learn the move Fly. (Charizard would gain this ability in ''Yellow'', while Dragonite would get it in ''Gold/Silver''.)
* AIBreaker: Highly skilled trainers such as the Elite Four will always use moves of a type which are super-effective against whichever Pokémon you have out...even if the move doesn't actually do any damage. Combine this with the fact that moves never run out of PP, and it becomes possible to beat, for example, Lance's Dragonite by sending out a Poison or Fighting-type as he will only use the non-damaging Psychic-type move Agility. (This famously happened in ''LetsPlay/TwitchPlaysPokemonRed''.)


** If you choose Charmander as your starter, you're going to have a tougher time with the first two gym leaders due their typing (Rock and Water, respectively.) With some effort and by catching a few other Mons to balance your team, you can reduce the difficulty significantly. Later in the game, the Charmander line becomes more useful.
** To be fair, since neither of Brock's Pokemon have any Rock or Ground moves anyway, the "difficulty" of using Charmander is mostly taking them down quickly while tanking their Normal-type moves. Onix's strongest move, Bide, can be avoided if you know what it does. Charmander will usually outspeed it anyway so you usually won't accidentally feed the attack. Plus, Charmander can burn them, reducing their main threat overall, and they generally don't have high Special anyway. Misty, however, is another matter altogether. Zigzagged in the remake as the Rock-types learn Rock Throw at the levels they are challenged, but Charmander in turn has access to Metal Claw to even things out.
** Those who choose Bulbasaur will experience more difficulty in the late game. Two of the final gym leaders (Sabrina and Blaine) will be strong against the dual Grass/Poison type Bulbasaur line. Additionally, 3/4 of the Elite Four all feature Mons strong against or resistant to it (though oddly one of them won't be able to even ''scratch'' the Bulbasaur line due to their only strong move being the non-damaging Agility thanks to an odd quirk in the AI), and your Rival's final team will have 4/6 Mons strong/resistant to it as well.
** Even as early as Misty is this trope visible, as, unless you overgrind an Ivysaur to at least mid-20s, her Starmie will plow right through it while tanking your paltry Vine Whip. Really, Bulbasaur only has usefulness against Brock. Hell, the difficulty of using Bulbasaur is seen as early as Viridian Forest, when it's disadvantaged against the most common creatures found there. Conversely, Charmander makes trekking through the forest a breeze, and generally seems to handle most early common trainers.

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** If you choose Charmander as your starter, you're going to have a tougher time with the first two gym leaders due their typing (Rock and Water, respectively.) With some effort and by catching a few other Mons to balance your team, you can reduce Downplayed as Brock's Pokémon lack any any actual Rock-type moves, reducing the difficulty significantly. Later in the game, the Charmander line becomes more useful.
** To be fair, since neither of Brock's Pokemon have any Rock or Ground moves anyway, the "difficulty" of using Charmander is mostly taking them
The battle boils down quickly while to tanking their Normal-type moves. moves while using Charmander's Ember to deal damage and, if you're lucky, inflict them with the Burn status. (Even though they resist the Fire-type Ember, each has low a low "Special" stat, meaning it still does more damage than anything else you have access to at this point.) You only need to beware of Onix's strongest move, Bide, can be avoided if you know what it does. which thanks to Charmander will usually outspeed it anyway so you usually won't accidentally feed the attack. Plus, Charmander can burn them, reducing their main threat overall, and they generally don't have high Special anyway. Misty, however, out-speeding Onix, is quite easy. Misti is another matter altogether. Zigzagged in matter, as she will OneHitKO all but the remake as most overleveled Charmander/Charmeleon, but you can field a much more diverse and balanced team by the Rock-types learn Rock Throw at time you get to her compared to Brock. Mt. Moon is also more difficult due to the levels they are challenged, presence of Geodude, but Charmander in turn their low Speed makes them easy to run from while you can still level-grind on weak Zubat and Paras (who has access a 4x weakness to Metal Claw to even things out.
Fire).
** Those who choose Bulbasaur will experience more difficulty in the late game. Two of the final gym leaders (Sabrina and Blaine) will be strong against the dual Grass/Poison type Bulbasaur line. Additionally, 3/4 of the Elite Four all feature Mons strong against or resistant to it (though oddly one of them won't be able to even ''scratch'' the Bulbasaur line due to their only strong move being the non-damaging Agility thanks to an odd quirk in the AI), and your Rival's final team will have 4/6 Mons strong/resistant to it as well.
** Even
well. This can even come into play as early as Misty is this trope visible, as, unless you overgrind an Ivysaur to at least mid-20s, Misti who, despite the type advantage, will have her Starmie will plow right through it stream-roll all but the most overleveled Ivysaur while tanking your its paltry Vine Whip. Really, Bulbasaur only has usefulness against Brock. Hell, the The difficulty of using Bulbasaur is seen as early as Viridian Forest, when it's disadvantaged against the most common creatures found there. Conversely, Charmander makes trekking through the forest a breeze, and generally seems to handle most early common trainers.


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* CharacterSelectForcing: Zigzagged from the originals when it comes to Charmander. Brock's Mons now get actual Rock and Ground type moves, but Charmander in turn has access to Metal Claw to even things out.


* OneTimeDungeon: The S.S. Anne sets sail once you heal the captain and leave, taking any items you forgot or trainers you didn't fight with it. Since there's quite a few trainers and [=TMs=] in there, you might want to check it thoroughly before healing the captain.

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* OneTimeDungeon: OneTimeDungeon:
**
The S.S. Anne sets sail once you heal the captain and leave, taking any items you forgot or trainers you didn't fight with it. Since there's quite a few trainers and [=TMs=] in there, you might want to check it thoroughly before healing the captain.captain.
** Downplayed with the Team Rocket base below the Game Corner and the Silph Co. building. While you can return to each to acquire any items you may have missed, all of the Rockets will clear out. If there are any you didn't battle, you miss out on the experience and money you could have earned. With few other means of reliably making money, skipping trainer battles isn't advised.

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* WorthIt: The NPC who tells you about the Pewter Museum ends his spiel by admitting that you do have to pay to get in, but promises that it's worth the price of admission. Given that that price is a mere 50 yen/Pokébucks, this is not actually a difficult bar to clear.


* PermanentlyMissableContent: If you trade your starting Pikachu away and then trade it back, it won't follow you anymore nor will it have a mood you can check on.

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