Follow TV Tropes

Following

History UsefulNotes / RussianLanguage

Go To



There ARE some very complicated rules behind it, but aside from rule of thumb that 'ё' is (amost) always stressed, they are too complex to be of use for anyone beside professional linguists. In the ancient proto-slavic language there was a set of reasonably consistent rules, where each morpheme had one of three possible associated preferred positions of stress and the interaction of those preferences determined the exact position of stress. But this simple story had changed over time, new preferences were introduced, exceptions arisen, loanwords had their own idea of where stress should be and so on, and so on, and so on, and now those rules are of no practical use for a student of Russian language.

to:

There ARE some very complicated rules behind it, but aside from rule of thumb that 'ё' is (amost) (almost) always stressed, they are too complex to be of use for anyone beside professional linguists. In the ancient proto-slavic language there was a set of reasonably consistent rules, where each morpheme had one of three possible associated preferred positions of stress and the interaction of those preferences determined the exact position of stress. But this simple story had changed over time, new preferences were introduced, exceptions arisen, loanwords had their own idea of where stress should be and so on, and so on, and so on, and now those rules are of no practical use for a student of Russian language.


Ending consonants are often pronounced unvoiced; this, paired with the fact Russian does not have an 'ng' sound, results in words like "strong" being pronounced "stronk." There is also no "th" sound in Russian, a trait it shares with many other European languages, so mispronouncing "th" as "s" or "z" (rare options include "f", "v" or even "d"), is also a part of Russian accent. Same thing with "w", Russians, like Germans, tend to pronounce it as "v" or sometimes "oo". And "h" is replaced "kh" (sound more close to "ch" in "loch") or sometimes "g". In Russia, "Harry Potter" is known as "Gary Potter" ("Гарри" pronounced "Garree" being the Russian transliteration of the English name).

to:

Ending consonants are often pronounced unvoiced; this, paired with the fact Russian does not have an 'ng' sound, results in words like "strong" being pronounced "stronk." There is also no "th" sound in Russian, a trait it shares with many other European languages, so mispronouncing "th" as "s" or "z" (rare options include "f", "v" or even "d"), is also a part of Russian accent. Same thing with "w", "w". Russians, like Germans, tend to pronounce it as "v" or sometimes "oo". And "h" is replaced "kh" (sound more close to "ch" in "loch") or sometimes "g". In Russia, "Harry Potter" is known as "Gary Potter" ("Гарри" pronounced "Garree" being the Russian transliteration of the English name).


Ending consonants are often pronounced unvoiced; this, paired with the fact Russian does not have 'ng' sound, results in words like "strong" being pronounced "stronk." There are also no "th" sounds in Russian, a trait it shares with many other European languages, so mispronouncing "th" as "s" or "z" (rare options include "f", "v" or even "d"), is also a part of Russian accent. Same thing with "w", Russians, like Germans, tend to pronounce it as "v" or sometimes "oo". And "h" is replaced "kh" (sound more close to "ch" in "loch") or sometimes "g". In Russia, "Harry Potter" is known as "Gary Potter" ("Гарри" pronounced "Garree" being the Russian transliteration of the English name).

to:

Ending consonants are often pronounced unvoiced; this, paired with the fact Russian does not have an 'ng' sound, results in words like "strong" being pronounced "stronk." There are is also no "th" sounds sound in Russian, a trait it shares with many other European languages, so mispronouncing "th" as "s" or "z" (rare options include "f", "v" or even "d"), is also a part of Russian accent. Same thing with "w", Russians, like Germans, tend to pronounce it as "v" or sometimes "oo". And "h" is replaced "kh" (sound more close to "ch" in "loch") or sometimes "g". In Russia, "Harry Potter" is known as "Gary Potter" ("Гарри" pronounced "Garree" being the Russian transliteration of the English name).


Apart from article misuse, there are other characteristic traits of a Russian accent. Most of them come from the use of Russian pronunciation: 'R' in Russian is trilled and vowels in unstressed positions are usually 'reduced' to very short vowels. Some English vowels are indistinguishable for the Russian ear (for example, it is difficult for them to distinguish "man" and "men" or "bat" and "bet"). [[note]]And much to their sorrow, "beach" and "bitch" and "sheet" and "shit" are also indistinguishable to them.[[/note]] Ending consonants are often pronounced unvoiced; this, paired with the fact Russian does not have 'ng' sound, results in words like "strong" being pronounced "stronk." There are also no "th" sounds in Russian, a trait it shares with many other European languages, so mispronouncing "th" as "s" or "z" (rare options include "f", "v" or even "d"), is also a part of Russian accent. Same thing with "w", Russians, like Germans, tend to pronounce it as "v" or sometimes "oo". And "h" is replaced "kh" (sound more close to "ch" in "loch") or sometimes "g". In Russia, "Harry Potter" is known as "Gary Potter" ("Гарри" pronounced "Garree" being the Russian transliteration of the English name).

to:

Apart from article misuse, there are other characteristic traits of a Russian accent. Most of them come from the use of Russian pronunciation: 'R' in Russian is trilled and vowels in unstressed positions are usually 'reduced' to very short vowels. Some English vowels are indistinguishable for the Russian ear (for example, it is difficult for them to distinguish "man" and "men" or "bat" and "bet"). [[note]]And much to their sorrow, "beach" and "bitch" and "sheet" and "shit" are also indistinguishable to them.[[/note]] [[/note]]

Ending consonants are often pronounced unvoiced; this, paired with the fact Russian does not have 'ng' sound, results in words like "strong" being pronounced "stronk." There are also no "th" sounds in Russian, a trait it shares with many other European languages, so mispronouncing "th" as "s" or "z" (rare options include "f", "v" or even "d"), is also a part of Russian accent. Same thing with "w", Russians, like Germans, tend to pronounce it as "v" or sometimes "oo". And "h" is replaced "kh" (sound more close to "ch" in "loch") or sometimes "g". In Russia, "Harry Potter" is known as "Gary Potter" ("Гарри" pronounced "Garree" being the Russian transliteration of the English name).


Apart from article misuse, there are other characteristic traits of a Russian accent. Most of them come from the use of Russian pronunciation: 'R' in Russian is trilled and vowels in unstressed positions are usually 'reduced' to very short vowels. Some English vowels are indistinguishable for the Russian ear (for example, it is difficult for them to distinguish "man" and "men" or "bat" and "bet"). Ending consonants are often pronounced unvoiced; this, paired with the fact Russian does not have 'ng' sound, results in words like "strong" being pronounced "stronk." There are also no "th" sounds in Russian, a trait it shares with many other European languages, so mispronouncing "th" as "s" or "z" (rare options include "f", "v" or even "d"), is also a part of Russian accent. Same thing with "w", Russians, like Germans, tend to pronounce it as "v" or sometimes "oo". And "h" is replaced "kh" (sound more close to "ch" in "loch") or sometimes "g". In Russia, "Harry Potter" is known as "Gary Potter" ("Гарри" pronounced "Garree" being the Russian transliteration of the English name).

to:

Apart from article misuse, there are other characteristic traits of a Russian accent. Most of them come from the use of Russian pronunciation: 'R' in Russian is trilled and vowels in unstressed positions are usually 'reduced' to very short vowels. Some English vowels are indistinguishable for the Russian ear (for example, it is difficult for them to distinguish "man" and "men" or "bat" and "bet"). [[note]]And much to their sorrow, "beach" and "bitch" and "sheet" and "shit" are also indistinguishable to them.[[/note]] Ending consonants are often pronounced unvoiced; this, paired with the fact Russian does not have 'ng' sound, results in words like "strong" being pronounced "stronk." There are also no "th" sounds in Russian, a trait it shares with many other European languages, so mispronouncing "th" as "s" or "z" (rare options include "f", "v" or even "d"), is also a part of Russian accent. Same thing with "w", Russians, like Germans, tend to pronounce it as "v" or sometimes "oo". And "h" is replaced "kh" (sound more close to "ch" in "loch") or sometimes "g". In Russia, "Harry Potter" is known as "Gary Potter" ("Гарри" pronounced "Garree" being the Russian transliteration of the English name).


Apart from article misuse, there are other characteristic traits of a Russian accent. Most of them come from the use of Russian pronunciation: 'R' in Russian is trilling and vowels in unstressed positions are usually 'reduced' to very short vowels, Russian does not have 'ng' sound (it is pronounced as n-g) and some English vowels are indistinguishable for the Russian ear (for example, it is difficult for them to distinguish "man" and "men" or "bat" and "bet"). Ending consonants are often pronounced unvoiced; this, paired with the "ng" hurdle, results in "drinkink" and "skiink". There are also no "th" sounds in Russian, a trait it shares with many other European languages, so mispronouncing "th" as "s" or "z" (rare options include "f", "v" or even "d"), is also a part of Russian accent. Same thing with "w", Russians, like Germans, tend to pronounce it as "v" or sometimes "oo". And "h" is replaced "kh" (sound more close to "ch" in "loch") or sometimes "g".

to:

Apart from article misuse, there are other characteristic traits of a Russian accent. Most of them come from the use of Russian pronunciation: 'R' in Russian is trilling trilled and vowels in unstressed positions are usually 'reduced' to very short vowels, Russian does not have 'ng' sound (it is pronounced as n-g) and some vowels. Some English vowels are indistinguishable for the Russian ear (for example, it is difficult for them to distinguish "man" and "men" or "bat" and "bet"). Ending consonants are often pronounced unvoiced; this, paired with the "ng" hurdle, fact Russian does not have 'ng' sound, results in "drinkink" and "skiink". words like "strong" being pronounced "stronk." There are also no "th" sounds in Russian, a trait it shares with many other European languages, so mispronouncing "th" as "s" or "z" (rare options include "f", "v" or even "d"), is also a part of Russian accent. Same thing with "w", Russians, like Germans, tend to pronounce it as "v" or sometimes "oo". And "h" is replaced "kh" (sound more close to "ch" in "loch") or sometimes "g". In Russia, "Harry Potter" is known as "Gary Potter" ("Гарри" pronounced "Garree" being the Russian transliteration of the English name).


There ARE some very complicated rules behind it, but aside from rule of thumb that 'ё' is (amost) always stressed, they are too complex to be of use for anyone beside professional linguists. In ancient proto-slavic language there was a set of reasonably consistent rules, where each morpheme had one of three possible associated preferred positions of stress and the interaction of those preferences determined the exact position of stress. But this simple story had changed over time, new preferences were introduced, exceptions arisen, loanwords had their own idea of where stress should be and so on, and so on, and so on, and now those rules are of no practical use for a student of Russian language.

to:

There ARE some very complicated rules behind it, but aside from rule of thumb that 'ё' is (amost) always stressed, they are too complex to be of use for anyone beside professional linguists. In the ancient proto-slavic language there was a set of reasonably consistent rules, where each morpheme had one of three possible associated preferred positions of stress and the interaction of those preferences determined the exact position of stress. But this simple story had changed over time, new preferences were introduced, exceptions arisen, loanwords had their own idea of where stress should be and so on, and so on, and so on, and now those rules are of no practical use for a student of Russian language.


There ARE some very complicated rules behind it, but aside from rule of thumb that 'ё' is (amost) always stressed, they are too complex to be of use for anyone beside professional linguists. In ancient praslavic language there was a set of reasonably consistent rules, where each morpheme had one of three possible associated preferred positions of stress and the interaction of those preferences determined the exact position of stress. But this simple story had changed over time, new preferences were introduced, exceptions arisen, loanwords had their own idea of where stress should be and so on, and so on, and so on, and now those rules are of no practical use for a student of Russian language.

to:

There ARE some very complicated rules behind it, but aside from rule of thumb that 'ё' is (amost) always stressed, they are too complex to be of use for anyone beside professional linguists. In ancient praslavic proto-slavic language there was a set of reasonably consistent rules, where each morpheme had one of three possible associated preferred positions of stress and the interaction of those preferences determined the exact position of stress. But this simple story had changed over time, new preferences were introduced, exceptions arisen, loanwords had their own idea of where stress should be and so on, and so on, and so on, and now those rules are of no practical use for a student of Russian language.


There ARE some very complicated rules behind it, but aside from rule of thumb that 'ё' is (amost) always stressed, they are too complex to be of use for anyone beside professional linguists. In ancient praslavic language there was a set of reasonably consistent rules, where each morpheme had one of three possible associated preferred position of stress and interaction of those preferences determined the exact position of stress. But this simple story had changed over time, new preferences were introduced, exceptions arisen, loanwords had their own idea of where stress should be and so on, and so on, and so on, and now those rules are of no practical use for a student of Russian language.

to:

There ARE some very complicated rules behind it, but aside from rule of thumb that 'ё' is (amost) always stressed, they are too complex to be of use for anyone beside professional linguists. In ancient praslavic language there was a set of reasonably consistent rules, where each morpheme had one of three possible associated preferred position positions of stress and the interaction of those preferences determined the exact position of stress. But this simple story had changed over time, new preferences were introduced, exceptions arisen, loanwords had their own idea of where stress should be and so on, and so on, and so on, and now those rules are of no practical use for a student of Russian language.


The hard sign, Ъ (Yer), used to be used as a means of identifying where a prefix joined a word, as well as a way of indicating palatalization. As with the soft sign, Yer (ь), it has no sound of its own and only exerts influences upon other sounds It marks the difference between съёмка (ssyomka) ([ˈsjomkə]): "filming" and Сёмка (syomka) ([ˈsʲomkə]): diminutive form of the male name Семён (Simon). Just like the soft sign, the Bolsheviks curbed much of its usage in the spelling reforms of 1918. Partially to simplify the spelling, and partially because it would save quite a considerable amount of ink and paper if they didn't have to print out vast numbers of additional characters. Yer is [[TheArtifact pretty much vestigial for the most part.]] There have been multiple attempts to just be rid of it already. None of them have succeeded.

to:

The hard sign, Ъ (Yer), used to be used as a means of identifying where a prefix joined a word, as well as a way of indicating palatalization. As with the soft sign, Yer (ь), it has no sound of its own and only exerts influences upon other sounds sounds. It marks the difference between съёмка (ssyomka) ([ˈsjomkə]): "filming" and Сёмка (syomka) ([ˈsʲomkə]): diminutive form of the male name Семён (Simon). Just like the soft sign, the Bolsheviks curbed much of its usage in the spelling reforms of 1918. Partially to simplify the spelling, and partially because it would save quite a considerable amount of ink and paper if they didn't have to print out vast numbers of additional characters. Yer is [[TheArtifact pretty much vestigial for the most part.]] There have been multiple attempts to just be rid of it already. None of them have succeeded.


* One can wonder about communicating by F-words only. The explanation is simple: Russian grammar. Morphologically, most words in Russian have a four-part structure: one or several prefixes, a root, one or several suffixes and an inflection. Some parts of this structure may be missing or empty, there are some cases that don't fit here, and of course prepositions and other small words do not have this structure, but it's a good general idea to start with. The root conveys the "base meaning" of the word, the inflection (indirectly) defines the word's place in the sentence's syntax, and prefixes and suffixes are used to alter the meaning of the root in a very wide range. For example, "выйти" and "войти" ("to walk out" and "to walk in") have different prefixes. There are several ramifications. First, you can stuff a lot of meaning into one word. More than that, sometimes roots get strung together: "волкодав" (wolfhound) has two roots - "волк" for wolf and "дав", as in "давить" - to stomp. You can even go further: string together "пар" (steam) and "ход" (walk) to get "пароход" (steamship, literally "steam walker"), then add a suffix to get пароходство" (steamshipping company). There's actually no theoretical limit for the number of roots within one word, but thinking of a word with three or four roots is a kind of a challenge. Second: you get a very flexible language. The popular saying calling Russian a "great and mighty" language (known to every Russian) is not entirely false, as you can see. Third, compared to English, words tend to be longer both in letters (which makes a major pain in the ass when you're translating comics) and in syllables (which makes a lot of trouble when you're dubbing). So, what makes a word a swearword? Answer is simple: the root. There are several roots (seven or so) which have the taboo ''mat'' status. Any word containing one of these roots is automatically a ''mat'' word. An example in English might be, "Abso-fucking-lutely," or "Fan-fucking-tastic", except in Russian this is a legitimate way to form words rather than clumsy colloquial neologism. Remember that prefixes, suffixes and inflections are still there, so you can still stuff a lot of meaning around the obscene root. You can even have two roots in a word, of which only one is a ''mat'' one, and your word still counts as an F-word. Bonus points if you can stuff two ''mat'' roots in one word, and even more bonus points if all roots in your sentence are ''mat'' roots.

to:

* One can wonder about communicating by F-words only. The explanation is simple: Russian grammar. Morphologically, most words in Russian have a four-part structure: one or several prefixes, a root, one or several suffixes and an inflection. Some parts of this structure may be missing or empty, there are some cases that don't fit here, and of course prepositions and other small words do not have this structure, but it's a good general idea to start with. The root conveys the "base meaning" of the word, the inflection (indirectly) defines the word's place in the sentence's syntax, and prefixes and suffixes are used to alter the meaning of the root in a very wide range. For example, "выйти" and "войти" ("to walk out" and "to walk in") have different prefixes. There are several ramifications. First, you can stuff a lot of meaning into one word. More than that, sometimes roots get strung together: "волкодав" (wolfhound) has two roots - "волк" for wolf and "дав", as in "давить" - to stomp. You can even go further: string together "пар" (steam) and "ход" (walk) to get "пароход" (steamship, literally "steam walker"), then add a suffix to get пароходство" "пароходство" (steamshipping company). There's actually no theoretical limit for the number of roots within one word, but thinking of a word with three or four roots is a kind of a challenge. Second: you get a very flexible language. The popular saying calling Russian a "great and mighty" language (known to every Russian) is not entirely false, as you can see. Third, compared to English, words tend to be longer both in letters (which makes a major pain in the ass when you're translating comics) and in syllables (which makes a lot of trouble when you're dubbing). So, what makes a word a swearword? Answer is simple: the root. There are several roots (seven or so) which have the taboo ''mat'' status. Any word containing one of these roots is automatically a ''mat'' word. An example in English might be, "Abso-fucking-lutely," or "Fan-fucking-tastic", except in Russian this is a legitimate way to form words rather than clumsy colloquial neologism. Remember that prefixes, suffixes and inflections are still there, so you can still stuff a lot of meaning around the obscene root. You can even have two roots in a word, of which only one is a ''mat'' one, and your word still counts as an F-word. Bonus points if you can stuff two ''mat'' roots in one word, and even more bonus points if all roots in your sentence are ''mat'' roots.


And of course, there is also ''mat'', a dialect consisting mostly of [[ClusterFBomb obscenities]] and words derived from them. Yes, the Russians invented an entire dialect just so they could curse more effectively. Russian obscenities are extremely creative and rich, and trash-talking Russians can convey complex messages through sentences which consist only of various Cluster F Bombs. This is a language form of choice for the most uncultured Russians, such as blue collar workers, homeless persons and petty criminals. Note the emphasis on "petty": TheMafiya has its own distinct style of thieves' cant, known as ''fenya'' or ''fenka''. (In fact, they traditonally consider the use of sexual pejoratives extremely SeriousBuisness.)

to:

And of course, there is also ''mat'', a dialect consisting mostly of [[ClusterFBomb obscenities]] and words derived from them. Yes, the Russians invented an entire dialect just so they could curse more effectively. Russian obscenities are extremely creative and rich, and trash-talking Russians can convey complex messages through sentences which consist only of various Cluster F Bombs. This is a language form of choice for the most uncultured Russians, such as blue collar workers, homeless persons and petty criminals. Note the emphasis on "petty": TheMafiya has its own distinct style of thieves' cant, known as ''fenya'' or ''fenka''. (In fact, they traditonally consider the use of sexual pejoratives extremely SeriousBuisness.SeriousBusiness.)


And of course, there is also ''mat'', a dialect consisting mostly of [[ClusterFBomb obscenities]] and words derived from them. Yes, the Russians invented an entire dialect just so they could curse more effectively. Russian obscenities are extremely creative and rich, and trash-talking Russians can convey complex messages through sentences which consist only of various Cluster F Bombs. This is a language form of choice for the most uncultured Russians, such as blue collar workers, homeless persons and petty criminals. Note the emphasis on "petty": TheMafiya has its own distinct style of thieves' cant, known as ''fenya'' or ''fenka''. (In fact, they traditonally consider use of sexual pejoratives extremely SeriousBuisness.)

to:

And of course, there is also ''mat'', a dialect consisting mostly of [[ClusterFBomb obscenities]] and words derived from them. Yes, the Russians invented an entire dialect just so they could curse more effectively. Russian obscenities are extremely creative and rich, and trash-talking Russians can convey complex messages through sentences which consist only of various Cluster F Bombs. This is a language form of choice for the most uncultured Russians, such as blue collar workers, homeless persons and petty criminals. Note the emphasis on "petty": TheMafiya has its own distinct style of thieves' cant, known as ''fenya'' or ''fenka''. (In fact, they traditonally consider the use of sexual pejoratives extremely SeriousBuisness.)


And of course, there is also ''mat'', a dialect consisting mostly of [[ClusterFBomb obscenities]] and words derived from them. Yes, the Russians invented an entire dialect just so they could curse more effectively. Russian obscenities are extremely creative and rich, and trash-talking Russians can convey complex messages through sentences which consist only of various Cluster F Bombs. This is a language form of choice for the most uncultured Russians, such as blue collar workers, homeless persons and petty criminals. Note the emphasis on "petty": TheMafiya has its own distinct style of thieves' cant, known as ''fenya'' or ''fenka''.

to:

And of course, there is also ''mat'', a dialect consisting mostly of [[ClusterFBomb obscenities]] and words derived from them. Yes, the Russians invented an entire dialect just so they could curse more effectively. Russian obscenities are extremely creative and rich, and trash-talking Russians can convey complex messages through sentences which consist only of various Cluster F Bombs. This is a language form of choice for the most uncultured Russians, such as blue collar workers, homeless persons and petty criminals. Note the emphasis on "petty": TheMafiya has its own distinct style of thieves' cant, known as ''fenya'' or ''fenka''. \n (In fact, they traditonally consider use of sexual pejoratives extremely SeriousBuisness.)


* One can wonder about communicating by F-words only. The explanation is simple: Russian grammar. Morphologically, most words in Russian have a four-part structure: one or several prefixes, a root, one or several suffixes and an inflection. Some parts of this structure may be missing or empty, there are some cases that don't fit here, and of course prepositions and other small words do not have this structure, but it's a good general idea to start with. The root conveys the "base meaning" of the word, the inflection (indirectly) defines the word's place in the sentence's syntax, and prefixes and suffixes are used to alter the meaning of the root in a very wide range. For example, "выйти" and "войти" ("to walk out" and "to walk in") have different prefixes. There are several ramifications. First, you can stuff a lot of meaning into one word. More than that, sometimes roots get strung together: "волкодав" (wolfhound) has two roots - "волк" for wolf and "дав", as in "давить" - to stomp. You can even go further: string together "пар" (steam) and "ход" (walk) to get "пароход" (steamship, literally "steam walker"), then add a suffix to get пароходство" (steamshipping company). There's actually no theoretical limit for the number of roots within one word, but thinking of a word with three or four roots is a kind of a challenge. Second: you get a very flexible language. The popular saying calling Russian a "great and mighty" language (known to every Russian) is not entirely false, as you can see. Third, compared to English, words tend to be longer both in letters (which makes a major pain in the ass when you're translating comics) and in syllables (which makes a lot of trouble when you're dubbing). So, what makes a word a swearword? Answer is simple: the root. There are several roots (seven or so) which have the taboo ''mat'' status. Any word containing one of these roots is automatically a ''mat'' word. An example in English might be, "Abso-fucking-lutely," or "Fan-fucking-tastic", except in Russian this is a legitimate way to form words rather than clumsy colloquial neologisms. Remember that prefixes, suffixes and inflections are still there, so you can still stuff a lot of meaning around the obscene root. You can even have two roots in a word, of which only one is a ''mat'' one, and your word still counts as an F-word. Bonus points if you can stuff two ''mat'' roots in one word, and even more bonus points if all roots in your sentence are ''mat'' roots.

to:

* One can wonder about communicating by F-words only. The explanation is simple: Russian grammar. Morphologically, most words in Russian have a four-part structure: one or several prefixes, a root, one or several suffixes and an inflection. Some parts of this structure may be missing or empty, there are some cases that don't fit here, and of course prepositions and other small words do not have this structure, but it's a good general idea to start with. The root conveys the "base meaning" of the word, the inflection (indirectly) defines the word's place in the sentence's syntax, and prefixes and suffixes are used to alter the meaning of the root in a very wide range. For example, "выйти" and "войти" ("to walk out" and "to walk in") have different prefixes. There are several ramifications. First, you can stuff a lot of meaning into one word. More than that, sometimes roots get strung together: "волкодав" (wolfhound) has two roots - "волк" for wolf and "дав", as in "давить" - to stomp. You can even go further: string together "пар" (steam) and "ход" (walk) to get "пароход" (steamship, literally "steam walker"), then add a suffix to get пароходство" (steamshipping company). There's actually no theoretical limit for the number of roots within one word, but thinking of a word with three or four roots is a kind of a challenge. Second: you get a very flexible language. The popular saying calling Russian a "great and mighty" language (known to every Russian) is not entirely false, as you can see. Third, compared to English, words tend to be longer both in letters (which makes a major pain in the ass when you're translating comics) and in syllables (which makes a lot of trouble when you're dubbing). So, what makes a word a swearword? Answer is simple: the root. There are several roots (seven or so) which have the taboo ''mat'' status. Any word containing one of these roots is automatically a ''mat'' word. An example in English might be, "Abso-fucking-lutely," or "Fan-fucking-tastic", except in Russian this is a legitimate way to form words rather than clumsy colloquial neologisms.neologism. Remember that prefixes, suffixes and inflections are still there, so you can still stuff a lot of meaning around the obscene root. You can even have two roots in a word, of which only one is a ''mat'' one, and your word still counts as an F-word. Bonus points if you can stuff two ''mat'' roots in one word, and even more bonus points if all roots in your sentence are ''mat'' roots.

Showing 15 edit(s) of 70

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report