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It follows the same basic format as its worldwide cousin. Teams are first required to qualify for the tournament itself through qualifying groups, although the hosts are granted automatic entry into the tournament proper (though this will not be the case in the pan-European 2020 tournament, with host cities spread over 12 countries). For the 2020 edition, the competing nations will be divided into ten groups, five with six teams and the other five having five. Each group will result in two teams qualifying for the tournament proper, with the other four coming from the new UEFA Nations League tournament.[[labelnote:explanation]]All the teams in Europe have been drawn into groups containing teams similiar in strength to themselves. After the qualifiers for Euro 2020 have been completed in November 2019, the group winners in each league are put into their league's play-offs, with the eventual winner joining the other 20 qualifiers. If a group winner has already qualified, a ranking system will be used to determine the team to replace them. If there are less than four teams in the entire League that failed to qualify, the play-off spot(s) will be awarded to teams in the league below them.[[/labelnote]] In the finals themselves there is another group stage which results in 16 teams going through into the knockout stage. The winners are crowned European champions.

This tournament is considered possibly more unpredictable than The World Cup, due in no small part to the shocking victories of Denmark in 1992 (the team was called up a few days before the beginning after the qualified Yugoslavia had to withdraw due to the war), and Greece in 2004 (participating for the second time and defeating host Portugal '''twice''' in the opening match and in the final) are considered two of the biggest upsets in '''football history'''. And then there's Iceland in 2016—the smallest country by far to ever reach the final tournament (population about 330,000), they made it to the quarterfinals, with an upset of England in the round of 16 ranking right up there with Denmark '92 and Greece '04. Least we forget, they managed to knock the Netherlands out in the qualifiers to even be at the tournament. And also Wales in 2016 managed to get to the semifinals in their first major tournament after 48 years (first British team to reach the semis in 20 years despite England).

to:

It follows the same basic format as its worldwide cousin. Teams are first required to qualify for the tournament itself through qualifying groups, although the hosts are granted automatic entry into the tournament proper (though this will not be the case in the pan-European 2020 tournament, with host cities spread over 12 countries). For the 2020 edition, the competing nations will be divided into ten groups, five with six teams and the other five having five. Each group will result in two teams qualifying for the tournament proper, with the other four coming from the new UEFA Nations League tournament.[[labelnote:explanation]]All the teams in Europe have been drawn into groups containing teams similiar in strength to themselves. After the qualifiers for Euro 2020 have been completed in November 2019, the group winners in each league are put into their league's play-offs, with the eventual winner of each league's path joining the other 20 qualifiers. If a group winner has already qualified, a ranking system will be used to determine the team to replace them. If there are less than four teams in the entire League that failed to qualify, the play-off spot(s) will be awarded to teams in the league below them.them; however, group winners are prevented from playing teams from a higher league.[[/labelnote]] In the finals themselves there is another group stage which results in 16 teams going through into the knockout stage. The winners are crowned European champions.

This tournament is considered possibly more unpredictable than The World Cup, due in no small part to the shocking victories of Denmark in 1992 (the team was called up a few days before the beginning after the qualified Yugoslavia had to withdraw were disqualified due to the war), and Greece in 2004 (participating for the second time and defeating host Portugal '''twice''' in the opening match and in the final) are considered two of the biggest upsets in '''football history'''. And then there's Iceland in 2016—the smallest country by far to ever reach the final tournament (population about 330,000), they made it to the quarterfinals, with an upset of England in the round of 16 ranking right up there with Denmark '92 and Greece '04. Least we forget, they managed to knock the Netherlands out in the qualifiers to even be at the tournament. And also Wales in 2016 managed to get to the semifinals in their first major tournament after 48 years (first British team to reach the semis in 20 years despite England).



--> First itinerant tournament, organised to celebrate the 60th anniversary of UEFA (or probably because no one wanted to host the tournament due to the expensive costs and the economic crisis[[note]]Turkey were considered the only serious bidder[[/note]]). The Belgian capital Brussels was intended to be amongst the host cities, but political delays relating to the stadium caused the city to lose their matches in December 2017, with their games being reallocated to London. None of the countries hosting games automatically qualify, but a qualifying host will automatically be placed in the group in their country and host at least two of their group games (for example, Italy will be placed into Group A and play two of their games in Rome if they qualify) - if both countries hosting a group qualify, an additional draw will be held to determine which country hosts the match between them. First to have the Nations League as a pre-qualifier fall-back.

to:

--> First itinerant tournament, organised to celebrate the 60th anniversary of UEFA (or probably because no one wanted to host the tournament due to the expensive costs and the economic crisis[[note]]Turkey were considered the only serious bidder[[/note]]). The Belgian capital Brussels was intended to be amongst the host cities, but political delays relating to the stadium caused the city to lose their matches in December 2017, with their games being reallocated to London. None of the countries hosting games automatically qualify, but a qualifying host will automatically be placed in the group in their country and host at least two of their group games (for example, Italy will be placed into Group A and play at least two of their games in Rome if they qualify) - if both countries hosting a group qualify, an additional draw will be held to determine which country hosts the match between them. First to have the Nations League as a pre-qualifier fall-back.


'''Cities (Ukraine):''' Donetsk / Kharkiv / Kiev (Final) / Lviv\\

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'''Cities (Ukraine):''' Donetsk / Kharkiv / Kiev Kyiv (Final) / Lviv\\


** When it comes to the qualification phase, we usually have: Andorra, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Malta, and ESPECIALLY San Marino, who never won a match in official competitions. Gibraltar might be on the way to becoming a rival to San Marino in this department. However, in the Nations League tournament that would become a fall-back tournament to precede Euro qualifiers from 2020, only San Marino failed to earn a point out of this lot - Gibraltar beat an Armenian side featuring Arsenal's Henrikh Mkhitaryan. That being said, few of the minnows will be likely to earn many points in regular qualifying, though Luxembourg might end up reaching the level 4 playoffs if a level 4 group winner (Belarus, Kosovo, FYR Macedonia or Georgia) qualifies through the regular group.

to:

** When it comes to the qualification phase, we usually have: Andorra, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Malta, and ESPECIALLY San Marino, who never won a match in official competitions. Gibraltar might be on the way to becoming a rival to San Marino in this department. However, in the Nations League tournament that would become a fall-back tournament to precede Euro qualifiers from 2020, only San Marino failed to earn a point out of this lot - Gibraltar beat an Armenian side featuring Arsenal's Henrikh Mkhitaryan. That being said, few of the minnows will be likely to earn many points in regular qualifying, though Luxembourg might end up reaching the level 4 playoffs if a level 4 group winner (Belarus, Kosovo, FYR Macedonia - renamed North Macedonia after the NL, and just before Euro 2020 qualifiers began - or Georgia) qualifies through the regular group.


*** The only exception so far was in the Friendly match just three days after the Paris gun attacks in November 2015. [[CrowningMomentOfHeartWarming The English welcomed the French team by lighting up Wembley in the colours of the Tricolour, emblazoning the motto of the Republic on the side of the stadium, replacing the traditional giant St. George's Cross in the home end with a Tricolour, impeccably observing the traditional minute's silence, before joining in loudly and enthusiastically with 'La Marseillaise', the French national anthem]] (fittingly, a [[BattleCry rousing call to arms]]) - and [[CrowdSong 90,000 football fans can sing extremely loudly.]] And then they didn't make a peep about their unexpected victory afterwards (the first one in nearly ten attempts since the late 1990's). Some things are more important than football. In June 2017, England played France in Paris - who repaid the favour due to the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2017_Manchester_Arena_bombing Manchester bombing]] and [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/June_2017_London_attack London Bridge/Borough Market attacks]] in the three weeks leading up to the game.

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*** The only exception so far was in the Friendly match just three days after the Paris gun attacks in November 2015. [[CrowningMomentOfHeartWarming The English welcomed the French team by lighting up Wembley in the colours of the Tricolour, emblazoning the motto of the Republic on the side of the stadium, replacing the traditional giant St. George's Cross in the home end with a Tricolour, impeccably observing the traditional minute's silence, before joining in loudly and enthusiastically with 'La Marseillaise', the French national anthem]] anthem (fittingly, a [[BattleCry rousing call to arms]]) - and [[CrowdSong 90,000 football fans can sing extremely loudly.]] And then they didn't make a peep about their unexpected victory afterwards (the first one in nearly ten attempts since the late 1990's). Some things are more important than football. In June 2017, England played France in Paris - who repaid the favour due to the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2017_Manchester_Arena_bombing Manchester bombing]] and [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/June_2017_London_attack London Bridge/Borough Market attacks]] in the three weeks leading up to the game.



* CurbStompBattle: While there are too many examples in the qualification phase, in the final stage we have: France beating Belgium and Denmark beating Yugoslavia by 5-0 (1984); hosts England beating The Netherlands 4-1 in the group stages (1996); Sweden beating Bulgaria by 5-0 (2004); Netherlands beating Italy by 3-0 (2008); Spain beating Ireland by 4-0, and, [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome in the final, by 4-0 as well, against Italy]] (2012); Belgium defeating Ireland 3–0 and Hungary 4–0, Spain beating Turkey 3–0, Wales beating Russia 3–0, Germany beating Slovakia 3–0, and France ending Iceland's dream run 5–2 (2016).

to:

* CurbStompBattle: While there are too many examples in the qualification phase, in the final stage we have: France beating Belgium and Denmark beating Yugoslavia by 5-0 (1984); hosts England beating The Netherlands 4-1 in the group stages (1996); Sweden beating Bulgaria by 5-0 (2004); Netherlands beating Italy by 3-0 (2008); Spain beating Ireland by 4-0, and, [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome in the final, by 4-0 as well, against Italy]] Italy (2012); Belgium defeating Ireland 3–0 and Hungary 4–0, Spain beating Turkey 3–0, Wales beating Russia 3–0, Germany beating Slovakia 3–0, and France ending Iceland's dream run 5–2 (2016).



** Italy had been thrown out of the World Cup two years earlier by the Soviet Union. [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome They went on to beat Yugoslavia in the final to win the tournament on home soil.]]

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** Italy had been thrown out of the World Cup two years earlier by the Soviet Union. [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome They went on to beat Yugoslavia in the final to win the tournament on home soil.]]


--> First itinerant tournament, organised to celebrate the 60th anniversary of UEFA (or probably because no one wanted to host the tournament due to the expensive costs and the economic crisis[[note]]Turkey were considered the only serious bidder[[/note]]). The Belgian capital Brussels was intended to be amongst the host cities, but political delays relating to the stadium caused the city to lose their matches in December 2017, with their games being reallocated to London. None of the countries hosting games automatically qualify, but a qualifying host will automatically be placed in the group in their country and host at least two of their group games (for example, Italy will be placed into Group A and play two of their games in Rome if they qualify) - if both countries hosting a group qualify, an additional draw will be held to determine which country hosts the match between them.

to:

--> First itinerant tournament, organised to celebrate the 60th anniversary of UEFA (or probably because no one wanted to host the tournament due to the expensive costs and the economic crisis[[note]]Turkey were considered the only serious bidder[[/note]]). The Belgian capital Brussels was intended to be amongst the host cities, but political delays relating to the stadium caused the city to lose their matches in December 2017, with their games being reallocated to London. None of the countries hosting games automatically qualify, but a qualifying host will automatically be placed in the group in their country and host at least two of their group games (for example, Italy will be placed into Group A and play two of their games in Rome if they qualify) - if both countries hosting a group qualify, an additional draw will be held to determine which country hosts the match between them.
them. First to have the Nations League as a pre-qualifier fall-back.



** When it comes to the qualification phase, we usually have: Andorra, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Malta, and ESPECIALLY San Marino, who never won a match in official competitions. Gibraltar might be on the way to becoming a rival to San Marino in this department. However, in the Nations League tournament that would become a fall-back tournament to precede Euro qualifiers from 2020, only San Marino failed to earn a point - Gibraltar beat an Armenian side featuring Arsenal's Henrikh Mkhitaryan. That being said, few of the minnows will be likely to earn many points in regular qualifying, though Luxembourg might end up reaching the level 4 playoffs if a level 4 group winner (Belarus, Kosovo, FYR Macedonia or Georgia) qualifies through the regular group.

to:

** When it comes to the qualification phase, we usually have: Andorra, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Malta, and ESPECIALLY San Marino, who never won a match in official competitions. Gibraltar might be on the way to becoming a rival to San Marino in this department. However, in the Nations League tournament that would become a fall-back tournament to precede Euro qualifiers from 2020, only San Marino failed to earn a point out of this lot - Gibraltar beat an Armenian side featuring Arsenal's Henrikh Mkhitaryan. That being said, few of the minnows will be likely to earn many points in regular qualifying, though Luxembourg might end up reaching the level 4 playoffs if a level 4 group winner (Belarus, Kosovo, FYR Macedonia or Georgia) qualifies through the regular group.



* EveryYearTheyFizzleOut: England, (in)famously. They only managed third place in 1968 (at a time when only four teams qualified) and the semi-finals in 1996 (when they hosted it). And then they crashed out to Iceland in 2016, leading to countless Brexit jokes (the loss occurring in the aftermath of the UK's vote to leave the [[UsefulNotes/EuropeanUnion EU]]).

to:

* EveryYearTheyFizzleOut: England, (in)famously. They only managed third place in 1968 (at a time when only four teams qualified) and the semi-finals in 1996 (when they hosted it). And then they crashed out to Iceland in 2016, leading to countless Brexit jokes (the loss occurring in the aftermath of the UK's vote to leave the [[UsefulNotes/EuropeanUnion EU]]).EU]]) including from the Icelanders' commentator in a viral rant, despite the island not being an EU member (though it is a part of the Common Market).


** When it comes to the qualification phase, we usually have: Andorra, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Malta, and ESPECIALLY San Marino, who never won a match in official competitions. Gibraltar might be on the way to becoming a rival to San Marino in this department.

to:

** When it comes to the qualification phase, we usually have: Andorra, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Malta, and ESPECIALLY San Marino, who never won a match in official competitions. Gibraltar might be on the way to becoming a rival to San Marino in this department. However, in the Nations League tournament that would become a fall-back tournament to precede Euro qualifiers from 2020, only San Marino failed to earn a point - Gibraltar beat an Armenian side featuring Arsenal's Henrikh Mkhitaryan. That being said, few of the minnows will be likely to earn many points in regular qualifying, though Luxembourg might end up reaching the level 4 playoffs if a level 4 group winner (Belarus, Kosovo, FYR Macedonia or Georgia) qualifies through the regular group.


It follows the same basic format as its worldwide cousin. Teams are first required to qualify for the tournament itself through qualifying groups, although the hosts are granted automatic entry into the tournament proper (though this will not be the case in the pan-European 2020 tournament, with host cities spread over 12 countries). For the 2020 edition, the competing nations will be divided into ten groups, five with six teams and the other five having five. Each group will result in two teams qualifying for the tournament proper, with the other four coming from the new UEFA Nations League tournament. (To summarise, all the teams in Europe have been drawn into groups containing teams similiar in strength to themselves. After the qualifiers for Euro 2020 have been completed in November 2019, the highest placed non-qualifier in each group in each league are put into their league's play-offs, with the eventual winner joining the other 20 qualifiers.) In the finals themselves there is another group stage which results in 16 teams going through into the knockout stage. The winners are crowned European champions.

to:

It follows the same basic format as its worldwide cousin. Teams are first required to qualify for the tournament itself through qualifying groups, although the hosts are granted automatic entry into the tournament proper (though this will not be the case in the pan-European 2020 tournament, with host cities spread over 12 countries). For the 2020 edition, the competing nations will be divided into ten groups, five with six teams and the other five having five. Each group will result in two teams qualifying for the tournament proper, with the other four coming from the new UEFA Nations League tournament. (To summarise, all [[labelnote:explanation]]All the teams in Europe have been drawn into groups containing teams similiar in strength to themselves. After the qualifiers for Euro 2020 have been completed in November 2019, the highest placed non-qualifier in each group winners in each league are put into their league's play-offs, with the eventual winner joining the other 20 qualifiers.) qualifiers. If a group winner has already qualified, a ranking system will be used to determine the team to replace them. If there are less than four teams in the entire League that failed to qualify, the play-off spot(s) will be awarded to teams in the league below them.[[/labelnote]] In the finals themselves there is another group stage which results in 16 teams going through into the knockout stage. The winners are crowned European champions.


It follows the same basic format as its worldwide cousin. Teams are first required to qualify for the tournament itself through qualifying groups, although the hosts are granted automatic entry into the tournament proper (though this will not be the case in the pan-European 2020 tournament, with host cities spread over 12 countries). For the 2020 edition, the competing nations will be divided into ten groups, five with six teams and the other five having five. Each group will result in two teams qualifying for the tournament proper, with the other four coming from the new UEFA Nations League tournament. (To summarise, all the teams in Europe have been drawn into groups containing teams similiar in strength to themselves. After the qualifiers for Euro 2020 have been completed in November 2019, the highest placed non-qualifier in each group are put into the play-offs, with the eventual winner joining the other 20 qualifiers.) In the finals themselves there is another group stage which results in 16 teams going through into the knockout stage. The winners are crowned European champions.

to:

It follows the same basic format as its worldwide cousin. Teams are first required to qualify for the tournament itself through qualifying groups, although the hosts are granted automatic entry into the tournament proper (though this will not be the case in the pan-European 2020 tournament, with host cities spread over 12 countries). For the 2020 edition, the competing nations will be divided into ten groups, five with six teams and the other five having five. Each group will result in two teams qualifying for the tournament proper, with the other four coming from the new UEFA Nations League tournament. (To summarise, all the teams in Europe have been drawn into groups containing teams similiar in strength to themselves. After the qualifiers for Euro 2020 have been completed in November 2019, the highest placed non-qualifier in each group in each league are put into the their league's play-offs, with the eventual winner joining the other 20 qualifiers.) In the finals themselves there is another group stage which results in 16 teams going through into the knockout stage. The winners are crowned European champions.


It follows the same basic format as its worldwide cousin. Teams are first required to qualify for the tournament itself through qualifying groups, although the hosts are granted automatic entry into the tournament proper (though this will not be the case in the pan-European 2020 tournament, with host cities spread over 12 countries). Since the final competition expanded to 24 teams for 2016, the competing nations were divided into nine groups, eight with 6 teams and one with 5. Each group results in two teams qualifying for the tournament proper, and the best third-place team (with results against the sixth-place team in each group discarded) also qualifying directly. The remaining eight third-place teams are drawn into four pairs, with each pair playing a two-legged match and each winner also advancing to the finals. In the finals themselves there is another group stage which results in 16 teams going through into the knockout stage. The winners are crowned European champions.

to:

It follows the same basic format as its worldwide cousin. Teams are first required to qualify for the tournament itself through qualifying groups, although the hosts are granted automatic entry into the tournament proper (though this will not be the case in the pan-European 2020 tournament, with host cities spread over 12 countries). Since For the final competition expanded to 24 teams for 2016, 2020 edition, the competing nations were will be divided into nine ten groups, eight five with 6 six teams and one with 5. the other five having five. Each group results will result in two teams qualifying for the tournament proper, and with the best third-place team (with results against other four coming from the sixth-place team new UEFA Nations League tournament. (To summarise, all the teams in Europe have been drawn into groups containing teams similiar in strength to themselves. After the qualifiers for Euro 2020 have been completed in November 2019, the highest placed non-qualifier in each group discarded) also qualifying directly. The remaining eight third-place teams are drawn put into four pairs, the play-offs, with each pair playing a two-legged match and each the eventual winner also advancing to joining the finals. other 20 qualifiers.) In the finals themselves there is another group stage which results in 16 teams going through into the knockout stage. The winners are crowned European champions.



--> First itinerant tournament, organised to celebrate the 60th anniversary of UEFA (or probably because no one wanted to host the tournament due to the expensive costs and the economic crisis[[note]]Turkey were considered the only serious bidder[[/note]]). The Belgian capital Brussels was intended to be amongst the host cities, but political delays relating to the stadium caused the city to lose their matches in December 2017, with their games being reallocated to London. None of the countries hosting games automatically qualify, but a qualifying host will automatically be placed in the group in their country and host at least two of their group games (for example, Italy will be placed into Group A and play two of their games in Rome if they qualify) - if both countries hosting a group qualify, an additional draw will be held to determine which country hosts the match between them,

to:

--> First itinerant tournament, organised to celebrate the 60th anniversary of UEFA (or probably because no one wanted to host the tournament due to the expensive costs and the economic crisis[[note]]Turkey were considered the only serious bidder[[/note]]). The Belgian capital Brussels was intended to be amongst the host cities, but political delays relating to the stadium caused the city to lose their matches in December 2017, with their games being reallocated to London. None of the countries hosting games automatically qualify, but a qualifying host will automatically be placed in the group in their country and host at least two of their group games (for example, Italy will be placed into Group A and play two of their games in Rome if they qualify) - if both countries hosting a group qualify, an additional draw will be held to determine which country hosts the match between them,
them.


--> First itinerant tournament, organised to celebrate the 60th anniversary of UEFA (or probably because no one wanted to host the tournament due to the expensive costs and the economic crisis). The Belgian capital Brussels was intended to be amongst the host cities, but political delays relating to the stadium caused the city to lose their matches in December 2017, with their games being reallocated to London. None of the countries hosting games automatically qualify, but a qualifying host will automatically be placed in the group in their country and host at least two of their group games (for example, Italy will be placed into Group A and play two of their games in Rome if they qualify).

to:

--> First itinerant tournament, organised to celebrate the 60th anniversary of UEFA (or probably because no one wanted to host the tournament due to the expensive costs and the economic crisis).crisis[[note]]Turkey were considered the only serious bidder[[/note]]). The Belgian capital Brussels was intended to be amongst the host cities, but political delays relating to the stadium caused the city to lose their matches in December 2017, with their games being reallocated to London. None of the countries hosting games automatically qualify, but a qualifying host will automatically be placed in the group in their country and host at least two of their group games (for example, Italy will be placed into Group A and play two of their games in Rome if they qualify).
qualify) - if both countries hosting a group qualify, an additional draw will be held to determine which country hosts the match between them,


--> First itinerant tournament, organised to celebrate the 60th anniversary of UEFA (or probably because no one wanted to host the tournament due to the expensive costs and the economic crisis). The Belgian capital Brussels was intended to be amongst the host cities, but political delays relating to the stadium caused the city to lose their matches in December 2017, with their games being reallocated to London.

to:

--> First itinerant tournament, organised to celebrate the 60th anniversary of UEFA (or probably because no one wanted to host the tournament due to the expensive costs and the economic crisis). The Belgian capital Brussels was intended to be amongst the host cities, but political delays relating to the stadium caused the city to lose their matches in December 2017, with their games being reallocated to London.
London. None of the countries hosting games automatically qualify, but a qualifying host will automatically be placed in the group in their country and host at least two of their group games (for example, Italy will be placed into Group A and play two of their games in Rome if they qualify).


--> First itinerant tournament, organised to celebrate the 60th anniversary of UEFA (or probably because no one wanted to host the tournament due to the expensive costs and the economic crisis). The Belgian capital Brussels was intended to be amongst the host cities, but political delays caused the city to lose their matches in December 2017, with their games being reallocated to London.

to:

--> First itinerant tournament, organised to celebrate the 60th anniversary of UEFA (or probably because no one wanted to host the tournament due to the expensive costs and the economic crisis). The Belgian capital Brussels was intended to be amongst the host cities, but political delays relating to the stadium caused the city to lose their matches in December 2017, with their games being reallocated to London.


-->'''Cities:''' Amsterdam, UsefulNotes/TheNetherlands / Baku, UsefulNotes/{{Azerbaijan}} / Bilbao, UsefulNotes/{{Spain}} / Brussels, UsefulNotes/{{Belgium}} / Bucharest, UsefulNotes/{{Romania}} / Budapest, UsefulNotes/{{Hungary}} / Copenhagen, UsefulNotes/{{Denmark}} / UsefulNotes/{{Dublin}}, UsefulNotes/{{Ireland}} / UsefulNotes/{{Glasgow}}, UsefulNotes/{{Scotland}} / London, ([[UsefulNotes/{{Britain}} England]] (Final) / Munich, UsefulNotes/{{Germany}} / Rome, UsefulNotes/{{Italy}} / [[UsefulNotes/TheCityFormerlyKnownAs Saint Petersburg]], UsefulNotes/{{Russia}}
--> First itinerant tournament, organised to celebrate the 60th anniversary of UEFA (or probably because no one wanted to host the tournament due to the expensive costs and the economic crisis)

to:

-->'''Cities:''' Amsterdam, UsefulNotes/TheNetherlands / Baku, UsefulNotes/{{Azerbaijan}} / Bilbao, UsefulNotes/{{Spain}} / Brussels, UsefulNotes/{{Belgium}} / Bucharest, UsefulNotes/{{Romania}} / Budapest, UsefulNotes/{{Hungary}} / Copenhagen, UsefulNotes/{{Denmark}} / UsefulNotes/{{Dublin}}, UsefulNotes/{{Ireland}} / UsefulNotes/{{Glasgow}}, UsefulNotes/{{Scotland}} / London, ([[UsefulNotes/{{Britain}} [[UsefulNotes/{{Britain}} England]] (Final) / Munich, UsefulNotes/{{Germany}} / Rome, UsefulNotes/{{Italy}} / [[UsefulNotes/TheCityFormerlyKnownAs Saint Petersburg]], UsefulNotes/{{Russia}}
--> First itinerant tournament, organised to celebrate the 60th anniversary of UEFA (or probably because no one wanted to host the tournament due to the expensive costs and the economic crisis)
crisis). The Belgian capital Brussels was intended to be amongst the host cities, but political delays caused the city to lose their matches in December 2017, with their games being reallocated to London.


-->'''Cities:''' Amsterdam, UsefulNotes/TheNetherlands / Baku, UsefulNotes/{{Azerbaijan}} / Bilbao, UsefulNotes/{{Spain}} / Brussels, UsefulNotes/{{Belgium}} / Bucharest, UsefulNotes/{{Romania}} / Budapest, UsefulNotes/{{Hungary}} / Copenhagen, UsefulNotes/{{Denmark}} / UsefulNotes/{{Dublin}}, UsefulNotes/{{Ireland}} / UsefulNotes/{{Glasgow}}, UsefulNotes/{{Scotland}} / London, ([[UsefulNotes/{{Britain}} England]] (Final) / Munich, UsefulNotes/{{Germany}} / Rome, UsefulNotes/{{Italy}} / [[TheCityFormerlyKnownAs Saint Petersburg]], UsefulNotes/{{Russia}}

to:

-->'''Cities:''' Amsterdam, UsefulNotes/TheNetherlands / Baku, UsefulNotes/{{Azerbaijan}} / Bilbao, UsefulNotes/{{Spain}} / Brussels, UsefulNotes/{{Belgium}} / Bucharest, UsefulNotes/{{Romania}} / Budapest, UsefulNotes/{{Hungary}} / Copenhagen, UsefulNotes/{{Denmark}} / UsefulNotes/{{Dublin}}, UsefulNotes/{{Ireland}} / UsefulNotes/{{Glasgow}}, UsefulNotes/{{Scotland}} / London, ([[UsefulNotes/{{Britain}} England]] (Final) / Munich, UsefulNotes/{{Germany}} / Rome, UsefulNotes/{{Italy}} / [[TheCityFormerlyKnownAs [[UsefulNotes/TheCityFormerlyKnownAs Saint Petersburg]], UsefulNotes/{{Russia}}


* EveryYearTheyFizzleOut: England, (in)famously. They only managed third place in 1968 and the semi-finals in 1996 (when they hosted it). And then they crashed out to Iceland in 2016, leading to countless Brexit jokes (the loss occurring in the aftermath of the UK's vote to leave the [[UsefulNotes/EuropeanUnion EU]]).

to:

* EveryYearTheyFizzleOut: England, (in)famously. They only managed third place in 1968 (at a time when only four teams qualified) and the semi-finals in 1996 (when they hosted it). And then they crashed out to Iceland in 2016, leading to countless Brexit jokes (the loss occurring in the aftermath of the UK's vote to leave the [[UsefulNotes/EuropeanUnion EU]]).

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