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** In the ''Original Sin'' tie-in for ''[[ComicBook/TheInvadersComicBook All-New Invaders]]'', it was revealed that [[spoiler:the original Invaders refused to create a tsunami to take out Japan's navy, hence why the government decided to use the bombs without the team knowing.]]

to:

** In the ''Original Sin'' ''ComicBook/OriginalSin'' tie-in for ''[[ComicBook/TheInvadersComicBook ''[[ComicBook/TheInvadersMarvel All-New Invaders]]'', it was revealed that [[spoiler:the original Invaders refused to create a tsunami to take out Japan's navy, hence why the government decided to use the bombs without the team knowing.]]


->''I made one great mistake in my life, when I signed the letter to President Roosevelt.''

to:

->''I made one great mistake in my life, when I signed the letter to [[UsefulNotes/FranklinDRoosevelt President Roosevelt.Roosevelt]].''



In August 1945 the war in Europe was over. Nazi Germany surrendered unconditionally on May 8th 1945. UsefulNotes/ImperialJapan however was still standing, despite most of Japan's cities being smoking ruins -- the result of a sustained campaign of firebombing by the American air force. The half-million men of [[UsefulNotes/KatanasOfTheRisingSun the China Expeditionary Force]] had been largely cut off from supplies and were forced to scour the countryside for food and grain, even as [[UsefulNotes/ChiangKaiShek Generalissimo Chiang's]] [[UsefulNotes/NoMoreEmperors Guomindang]] moved to crush them one by one. Despite all this, the Japanese government remained outwardly defiant. As the Allied forces in the Pacific finally drew near, it seemed an invasion would be necessary to force Japan to surrender. \\

to:

In August 1945 the war in Europe was over. Nazi Germany UsefulNotes/NaziGermany surrendered unconditionally on May 8th 1945. However, UsefulNotes/ImperialJapan however was still standing, despite most of Japan's cities being smoking ruins -- the result of a sustained campaign of firebombing by the American air force. The half-million men of [[UsefulNotes/KatanasOfTheRisingSun the China Expeditionary Force]] had been largely cut off from supplies and were forced to scour the countryside for food and grain, even as [[UsefulNotes/ChiangKaiShek Generalissimo Chiang's]] [[UsefulNotes/NoMoreEmperors Guomindang]] moved to crush them one by one. Despite all this, the Japanese government remained outwardly defiant. As the Allied forces in the Pacific finally drew near, it seemed an invasion would be necessary to force Japan to surrender. \\



** In the ''Original Sin'' tie-in for ''[[ComicBook/TheInvaders All-New Invaders]]'', it was revealed that [[spoiler:the original Invaders refused to create a tsunami to take out Japan's navy, hence why the government decided to use the bombs without the team knowing.]]

to:

** In the ''Original Sin'' tie-in for ''[[ComicBook/TheInvaders ''[[ComicBook/TheInvadersComicBook All-New Invaders]]'', it was revealed that [[spoiler:the original Invaders refused to create a tsunami to take out Japan's navy, hence why the government decided to use the bombs without the team knowing.]]


Despite the absolute destruction wrought in Hiroshima, it was not immediately apparent to the rest of the country what exactly had happened. Soon after, Japan's main broadcasting corporation's radio control operator noticed the signal to the Hiroshima station [[DisconnectedByDeath was as dead as,]] well, [[ShapedLikeItself something that has had an atomic bomb dropped on it]]. At military headquarters, many thought it the result of some technical error or meteorological phenomenon, despite the total loss of contact with all stations in and around Hiroshima. It wasn't until August the 8th that Radio Tokyo reported that "Practically all living things, human and animal, were literally seared to death" and people realized it was neither an error, a natural phenomenon, nor just another run-of-the-mill strategic bombing--there had been no smoke on the horizon, no flames in the night sky indicative of the infamous firebombing raids, no massive formations of bombers filling the air with their ominous buzz; whatever the Americans had deployed against Hiroshima, it had wiped out the city in a single, brutal moment and left almost nothing behind.\\

to:

Despite the absolute destruction wrought in Hiroshima, it was not immediately apparent to the rest of the country what exactly had happened. Soon after, Japan's main broadcasting corporation's radio control operator noticed the signal to the Hiroshima station [[DisconnectedByDeath was as dead as,]] well, [[ShapedLikeItself something that has had an atomic bomb dropped on it]]. At military headquarters, many thought it the result of some technical error or meteorological phenomenon, despite the total loss of contact with all stations in and around Hiroshima. It wasn't until August the 8th that Radio Tokyo reported that "Practically all living things, human and animal, were literally seared to death" and people realized it was neither an error, a natural phenomenon, nor just another run-of-the-mill strategic bombing--there had been no smoke on the horizon, no flames in the night sky indicative of the infamous firebombing raids, no massive formations of bombers filling the air with their ominous buzz; whatever the Americans had deployed against Hiroshima, it had wiped out the city in a single, brutal moment and left almost nothing and no one behind.\\


Despite the absolute destruction wrought in Hiroshima, it was not immediately apparent to the rest of the country what exactly had happened. Soon after, Japan's main broadcasting corporation's radio control operator noticed the signal to the Hiroshima station [[DisconnectedByDeath was as dead as,]] well, [[ShapedLikeItself something that has had an atomic bomb dropped on it]]. At military headquarters, many thought it the result of some technical error or meteorological phenomenon, despite the total loss of contact with all stations in and around Hiroshima. It wasn't until August the 8th that Radio Tokyo reported that "Practically all living things, human and animal, were literally seared to death" and people realized it was neither an error, a natural phenomenon, nor just another run-of-the-mill strategic bombing. \\

to:

Despite the absolute destruction wrought in Hiroshima, it was not immediately apparent to the rest of the country what exactly had happened. Soon after, Japan's main broadcasting corporation's radio control operator noticed the signal to the Hiroshima station [[DisconnectedByDeath was as dead as,]] well, [[ShapedLikeItself something that has had an atomic bomb dropped on it]]. At military headquarters, many thought it the result of some technical error or meteorological phenomenon, despite the total loss of contact with all stations in and around Hiroshima. It wasn't until August the 8th that Radio Tokyo reported that "Practically all living things, human and animal, were literally seared to death" and people realized it was neither an error, a natural phenomenon, nor just another run-of-the-mill strategic bombing. bombing--there had been no smoke on the horizon, no flames in the night sky indicative of the infamous firebombing raids, no massive formations of bombers filling the air with their ominous buzz; whatever the Americans had deployed against Hiroshima, it had wiped out the city in a single, brutal moment and left almost nothing behind.\\



In an instant, "Little Boy" killed 7080,000 people, including 20,000 Japanese military personnel and 20,000 Koreans, and destroyed nearly 48,000 buildings (including the headquarters of the 2nd General Army and Fifth Division). Contrary to popular imagination, "Little Boy" did not strike the ground and then detonate like a conventional bomb. It exploded midair (at about 1850 feet above the ground), and thus the force of the explosion radiated [[SphereOfDestruction in all directions]] -- including down, directly over the Shima Surgical Clinic.[[note]]Crosswinds caused the bomb to deviate by about 800 feet from the Aioi Bridge but, given the power of the bomb itself, the results were the same regardless.[[/note]] Only reinforced concrete structures could withstand the force of the blast and only a few such buildings had been built during the war years. Many individuals out in the streets were vaporized by the light and heat of the blast. Others became covered by third degree burns on their exposed flesh -- not from its heat, but from the light of the explosion. Those wearing clothing had the patterns of their clothes seared into their skin. Anyone unfortunate enough to be looking in the general direction of the blast was either temporarily or permanently blinded by its light. 90% of the doctors and nurses in the city were killed by the blast -- the others needed to come together to try and save the people injured by this revolutionary new weapon. One of the survivors of the bomb was Doctor Terufumi Sasaki. A young man at the time, he quickly took stock of the horrific state of the survivors and began to not just treat them, but more importantly, [[FlingALightIntoTheFuture document their condition and the effectiveness of the treatments the Hiroshima medical teams provided.]] Much of what we know today about [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acute_radiation_syndrome Acute Radiation Syndrome]] comes from Dr. Sasaki's notes. The majority of people within 2,000m (~1 mile) of the blast and not shielded behind concrete walls would succumb to Acute Radiation Syndrome and die within a month. \\




Despite the absolute destruction wrought in Hiroshima, it was not immediately apparent to the rest of the country what exactly had happened. Soon after, Japan's main broadcasting corporation's radio control operator noticed the signal to the Hiroshima station [[DisconnectedByDeath was as dead as,]] well, [[ShapedLikeItself something that has had an atomic bomb dropped on it]]. At military headquarters, many thought it the result of some technical error or meteorological phenomenon, despite the total loss of contact with all stations in and around Hiroshima. It wasn't until August the 8th that Radio Tokyo reported that "Practically all living things, human and animal, were literally seared to death" and people realized it was neither an error, a natural phenomenon, nor just another run-of-the-mill strategic bombing. \\

to:

\nDespite In an instant, "Little Boy" killed 7080,000 people, including 20,000 Japanese military personnel and 20,000 Koreans, and destroyed nearly 48,000 buildings (including the absolute destruction wrought in Hiroshima, it was not immediately apparent to the rest headquarters of the country what exactly 2nd General Army and Fifth Division). Contrary to popular imagination, "Little Boy" did not strike the ground and then detonate like a conventional bomb. It exploded midair (at about 1850 feet above the ground), and thus the force of the explosion radiated [[SphereOfDestruction in all directions]] -- including down, directly over the Shima Surgical Clinic.[[note]]Crosswinds caused the bomb to deviate by about 800 feet from the Aioi Bridge but, given the power of the bomb itself, the results were the same regardless.[[/note]] Only reinforced concrete structures could withstand the force of the blast and only a few such buildings had happened. Soon after, Japan's main broadcasting corporation's radio control operator noticed been built during the signal war years. Many individuals out in the streets were vaporized by the light and heat of the blast. Others became covered by third degree burns on their exposed flesh -- not from its heat, but from the light of the explosion. Those wearing clothing had the patterns of their clothes seared into their skin. Anyone unfortunate enough to be looking in the general direction of the blast was either temporarily or permanently blinded by its light. 90% of the doctors and nurses in the city were killed by the blast -- the others needed to come together to try and save the people injured by this revolutionary new weapon. One of the survivors of the bomb was Doctor Terufumi Sasaki. A young man at the time, he quickly took stock of the horrific state of the survivors and began to not just treat them, but more importantly, [[FlingALightIntoTheFuture document their condition and the effectiveness of the treatments the Hiroshima station [[DisconnectedByDeath was as dead as,]] well, [[ShapedLikeItself something that has had an atomic bomb dropped on it]]. At military headquarters, many thought it the result medical teams provided.]] Much of some technical error or meteorological phenomenon, despite the total loss what we know today about [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acute_radiation_syndrome Acute Radiation Syndrome]] comes from Dr. Sasaki's notes. The majority of contact with all stations in and around Hiroshima. It wasn't until August the 8th that Radio Tokyo reported that "Practically all living things, human and animal, were literally seared to death" and people realized it was neither an error, within 2,000m (~1 mile) of the blast and not shielded behind concrete walls would succumb to Acute Radiation Syndrome and die within a natural phenomenon, nor just another run-of-the-mill strategic bombing.month. \\


Added DiffLines:


Despite the absolute destruction wrought in Hiroshima, it was not immediately apparent to the rest of the country what exactly had happened. Soon after, Japan's main broadcasting corporation's radio control operator noticed the signal to the Hiroshima station [[DisconnectedByDeath was as dead as,]] well, [[ShapedLikeItself something that has had an atomic bomb dropped on it]]. At military headquarters, many thought it the result of some technical error or meteorological phenomenon, despite the total loss of contact with all stations in and around Hiroshima. It wasn't until August the 8th that Radio Tokyo reported that "Practically all living things, human and animal, were literally seared to death" and people realized it was neither an error, a natural phenomenon, nor just another run-of-the-mill strategic bombing. \\
\\


The choosing of Nagasaki and Hiroshima as the targets was almost a chance event, as there were four potential cities that could be targeted. In particular, Kokura was the intended target for the second bomb (and had been the backup target for the first), [[ForWantOfANail but Nagasaki was attacked instead because of poor visibility over Kokura]]. This has resulted in Kokura being known as a lucky city. As for Hiroshima, many officials had actually been in support of bombing Kyoto, due to its industrial significance, but the city was removed from the target list due to its historical, religious and cultural importance to the Japanese people.[[note]]The removal was mostly the work of one Henry L. Stimson, the Secretary of War at the time, who appealed directly to President Truman to get Kyoto removed; It was no coincidence that Stimson had had his honeymoon in the city, and subsequently had fallen in love with it.[[/note]] Thus, Hiroshima was chosen as the first atomic bombing target. On August 6th, 1945, at 8:15 a.m. on an already hot summer morning, the B-29 Superfortress ''Enola Gay'' appeared in the skies high above Hiroshima, carrying ''Little Boy'' in her bomb bay. Air raid sirens initially went off, but seeing the small flight of American planes (initially a single weather reconnaissance plane, followed by the strike package consisting of the ''Enola Gay'' and two additional B-29s carrying cameras and airborne instrumentation) and taking it for a scouting mission, the all clear was sounded. Just as people were emerging from their air raid shelters, ''Enola Gay'' Bombardier Thomas Ferebee placed the bombsight's crosshairs over the Aioi Bridge, a unique T-shaped bridge that was essentially right in the middle of the city, and released "Little Boy." Crosswinds caused the bomb to deviate by about 800 feet, but the results were the same regardless; in an instant, "Little Boy" killed 7080,000 people, including 20,000 Japanese military personnel and 20,000 Koreans, and destroyed nearly 48,000 buildings (including the headquarters of the 2nd General Army and Fifth Division). \\

to:

The choosing of Nagasaki and Hiroshima as the targets was almost a chance event, as there were four potential cities that could be targeted. In particular, Kokura was the intended target for the second bomb (and had been the backup target for the first), [[ForWantOfANail but Nagasaki was attacked instead because of poor visibility over Kokura]]. This has resulted in Kokura being known as a lucky city. As for Hiroshima, many officials had actually been in support of bombing Kyoto, due to its industrial significance, but the city was removed from the target list due to its historical, religious and cultural importance to the Japanese people.[[note]]The removal was mostly the work of one Henry L. Stimson, the Secretary of War at the time, who appealed directly to President Truman to get Kyoto removed; It was no coincidence that Stimson had had his honeymoon in the city, and subsequently had fallen in love with it.[[/note]] Thus, Hiroshima was chosen as the first atomic bombing target. On August 6th, 1945, at 8:15 a.m. on an already hot summer morning, the B-29 Superfortress ''Enola Gay'' appeared in the skies high above Hiroshima, carrying ''Little Boy'' in her bomb bay. Air raid sirens initially went off, but seeing the small flight of American planes (initially a single weather reconnaissance plane, followed by the strike package consisting of the ''Enola Gay'' and two additional B-29s carrying cameras and airborne instrumentation) and taking it for a scouting mission, the all clear was sounded. Just as people were emerging from their air raid shelters, ''Enola Gay'' Bombardier Thomas Ferebee placed the bombsight's crosshairs over the Aioi Bridge, a unique T-shaped bridge that was essentially right in the middle of the city, and released "Little Boy." Crosswinds caused the bomb to deviate by about 800 feet, but the results were the same regardless; in \\

In
an instant, "Little Boy" killed 7080,000 people, including 20,000 Japanese military personnel and 20,000 Koreans, and destroyed nearly 48,000 buildings (including the headquarters of the 2nd General Army and Fifth Division).Division). Contrary to popular imagination, "Little Boy" did not strike the ground and then detonate like a conventional bomb. It exploded midair (at about 1850 feet above the ground), and thus the force of the explosion radiated [[SphereOfDestruction in all directions]] -- including down, directly over the Shima Surgical Clinic.[[note]]Crosswinds caused the bomb to deviate by about 800 feet from the Aioi Bridge but, given the power of the bomb itself, the results were the same regardless.[[/note]] Only reinforced concrete structures could withstand the force of the blast and only a few such buildings had been built during the war years. Many individuals out in the streets were vaporized by the light and heat of the blast. Others became covered by third degree burns on their exposed flesh -- not from its heat, but from the light of the explosion. Those wearing clothing had the patterns of their clothes seared into their skin. Anyone unfortunate enough to be looking in the general direction of the blast was either temporarily or permanently blinded by its light. 90% of the doctors and nurses in the city were killed by the blast -- the others needed to come together to try and save the people injured by this revolutionary new weapon. One of the survivors of the bomb was Doctor Terufumi Sasaki. A young man at the time, he quickly took stock of the horrific state of the survivors and began to not just treat them, but more importantly, [[FlingALightIntoTheFuture document their condition and the effectiveness of the treatments the Hiroshima medical teams provided.]] Much of what we know today about [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acute_radiation_syndrome Acute Radiation Syndrome]] comes from Dr. Sasaki's notes. The majority of people within 2,000m (~1 mile) of the blast and not shielded behind concrete walls would succumb to Acute Radiation Syndrome and die within a month. \\



Contrary to popular imagination, "Little Boy" did not strike the ground and then detonate like a conventional bomb. It exploded midair (at about 1850 feet above the ground), and thus the force of the explosion radiated [[SphereOfDestruction in all directions]] -- including down, directly over the Shima Surgical Clinic. Only reinforced concrete structures could withstand the force of the blast and only a few such buildings had been built during the war years. Many individuals out in the streets were vaporized by the light and heat of the blast. Others became covered by third degree burns on their exposed flesh -- not from its heat, but from the light of the explosion. Those wearing clothing had the patterns of their clothes seared into their skin. Anyone unfortunate enough to be looking in the general direction of the blast was either temporarily or permanently blinded by its light. 90% of the doctors and nurses in the city were killed by the blast -- the others needed to come together to try and save the people injured by this revolutionary new weapon. One of the survivors of the bomb was Doctor Terufumi Sasaki. A young man at the time, he quickly took stock of the horrific state of the survivors and began to not just treat them, but more importantly, [[FlingALightIntoTheFuture document their condition and the effectiveness of the treatments the Hiroshima medical teams provided.]] Much of what we know today about [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acute_radiation_syndrome Acute Radiation Syndrome]] comes from Dr. Sasaki's notes. The majority of people within 2,000m (~1 mile) of the blast and not shielded behind concrete walls would succumb to Acute Radiation Syndrome and die within a month. \\

to:

Contrary to popular imagination, "Little Boy" did Despite the absolute destruction wrought in Hiroshima, it was not strike immediately apparent to the ground and then detonate like a conventional bomb. It exploded midair (at about 1850 feet above the ground), and thus the force rest of the explosion radiated [[SphereOfDestruction in all directions]] -- including down, directly over country what exactly had happened. Soon after, Japan's main broadcasting corporation's radio control operator noticed the Shima Surgical Clinic. Only reinforced concrete structures could withstand the force of the blast and only a few such buildings had been built during the war years. Many individuals out in the streets were vaporized by the light and heat of the blast. Others became covered by third degree burns on their exposed flesh -- not from its heat, but from the light of the explosion. Those wearing clothing had the patterns of their clothes seared into their skin. Anyone unfortunate enough signal to be looking in the general direction of the blast was either temporarily or permanently blinded by its light. 90% of the doctors and nurses in the city were killed by the blast -- the others needed to come together to try and save the people injured by this revolutionary new weapon. One of the survivors of the bomb was Doctor Terufumi Sasaki. A young man at the time, he quickly took stock of the horrific state of the survivors and began to not just treat them, but more importantly, [[FlingALightIntoTheFuture document their condition and the effectiveness of the treatments the Hiroshima medical teams provided.]] Much station [[DisconnectedByDeath was as dead as,]] well, [[ShapedLikeItself something that has had an atomic bomb dropped on it]]. At military headquarters, many thought it the result of what we know today about [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acute_radiation_syndrome Acute Radiation Syndrome]] comes from Dr. Sasaki's notes. The majority some technical error or meteorological phenomenon, despite the total loss of contact with all stations in and around Hiroshima. It wasn't until August the 8th that Radio Tokyo reported that "Practically all living things, human and animal, were literally seared to death" and people within 2,000m (~1 mile) of the blast and not shielded behind concrete walls would succumb to Acute Radiation Syndrome and die within realized it was neither an error, a month.natural phenomenon, nor just another run-of-the-mill strategic bombing. \\




Despite the absolute destruction wrought in Hiroshima, it was not immediately apparent to the rest of the country what exactly had happened. Soon after, Japan's main broadcasting corporation's radio control operator noticed the signal to the Hiroshima station [[DisconnectedByDeath was as dead as,]] well, [[ShapedLikeItself something that has had an atomic bomb dropped on it]]. At military headquarters, many thought it the result of some technical error or meteorological phenomenon, despite the total loss of contact with all stations in and around Hiroshima. It wasn't until August the 8th that Radio Tokyo reported that "Practically all living things, human and animal, were literally seared to death" and people realized it was neither an error, a natural phenomenon, nor just another run-of-the-mill strategic bombing. \\
\\


The choosing of Nagasaki and Hiroshima as the targets was almost a chance event, as there were four potential cities that could be targeted. In particular, Kokura was the intended target for the second bomb (and had been the backup target for the first), [[ForWantOfANail but Nagasaki was attacked instead because of poor visibility over Kokura]]. This has resulted in Kokura being known as a lucky city. As for Hiroshima, many officials had actually been in support of bombing Kyoto, due to its industrial significance, but the city was removed from the target list due to its historical, religious and cultural significance to the Japanese people.[[note]]The removal was mostly the work of one Henry L. Stimson, the Secretary of War at the time, who appealed directly to President Truman to get Kyoto removed; It was no coincidence that Stimson had had his honeymoon in the city, and subsequently had fallen in love with it.[[/note]] Thus, Hiroshima was chosen as the first atomic bombing target. On August 6th, 1945, at 8:15 a.m. on an already hot summer morning, the B-29 Superfortress ''Enola Gay'' appeared in the skies high above Hiroshima, carrying ''Little Boy'' in her bomb bay. Air raid sirens initially went off, but seeing the small flight of American planes (initially a single weather reconnaissance plane, followed by the strike package consisting of the ''Enola Gay'' and two additional B-29s carrying cameras and airborne instrumentation) and taking it for a scouting mission, the all clear was sounded. Just as people were emerging from their air raid shelters, ''Enola Gay'' Bombardier Thomas Ferebee placed the bombsight's crosshairs over the Aioi Bridge, a unique T-shaped bridge that was essentially right in the middle of the city, and released "Little Boy." Crosswinds caused the bomb to deviate by about 800 feet, but the results were the same regardless; in an instant, "Little Boy" killed 7080,000 people, including 20,000 Japanese military personnel and 20,000 Koreans, and destroyed nearly 48,000 buildings (including the headquarters of the 2nd General Army and Fifth Division). \\

to:

The choosing of Nagasaki and Hiroshima as the targets was almost a chance event, as there were four potential cities that could be targeted. In particular, Kokura was the intended target for the second bomb (and had been the backup target for the first), [[ForWantOfANail but Nagasaki was attacked instead because of poor visibility over Kokura]]. This has resulted in Kokura being known as a lucky city. As for Hiroshima, many officials had actually been in support of bombing Kyoto, due to its industrial significance, but the city was removed from the target list due to its historical, religious and cultural significance importance to the Japanese people.[[note]]The removal was mostly the work of one Henry L. Stimson, the Secretary of War at the time, who appealed directly to President Truman to get Kyoto removed; It was no coincidence that Stimson had had his honeymoon in the city, and subsequently had fallen in love with it.[[/note]] Thus, Hiroshima was chosen as the first atomic bombing target. On August 6th, 1945, at 8:15 a.m. on an already hot summer morning, the B-29 Superfortress ''Enola Gay'' appeared in the skies high above Hiroshima, carrying ''Little Boy'' in her bomb bay. Air raid sirens initially went off, but seeing the small flight of American planes (initially a single weather reconnaissance plane, followed by the strike package consisting of the ''Enola Gay'' and two additional B-29s carrying cameras and airborne instrumentation) and taking it for a scouting mission, the all clear was sounded. Just as people were emerging from their air raid shelters, ''Enola Gay'' Bombardier Thomas Ferebee placed the bombsight's crosshairs over the Aioi Bridge, a unique T-shaped bridge that was essentially right in the middle of the city, and released "Little Boy." Crosswinds caused the bomb to deviate by about 800 feet, but the results were the same regardless; in an instant, "Little Boy" killed 7080,000 people, including 20,000 Japanese military personnel and 20,000 Koreans, and destroyed nearly 48,000 buildings (including the headquarters of the 2nd General Army and Fifth Division). \\


->''I made one great mistake in my life, when I signed the letter (written by Leo Szilard, describing the possible use of Uranium as an explosive) to President Roosevelt.''
-->--'''UsefulNotes/AlbertEinstein'''

to:

->''I made one great mistake in my life, when I signed the letter (written by Leo Szilard, describing the possible use of Uranium as an explosive) to President Roosevelt.''
-->--'''UsefulNotes/AlbertEinstein'''
-->--'''UsefulNotes/AlbertEinstein'''[[note]]The letter in question was one written by Leo Szilard, describing the possible use of Uranium as an explosive, and which essentially kickstarted America's "Manhattan Project" that would result in the production of ''Little Boy'' and ''Fat Man''.[[/note]]



Despite the absolute destruction wrought by Little Boy, it was not immediately apparent to the rest of the country what exactly had happenned. Soon after, Japan's main broadcasting corporation's radio control operator noticed the signal to the Hiroshima station [[DisconnectedByDeath was as dead as,]] well, [[ShapedLikeItself something that has had an atomic bomb dropped on it]]. At military headquarters, many thought it the result of some technical error or meteorological phenomenon, despite the total loss of contact with all stations in and around Hiroshima. It wasn't until August the 8th that Radio Tokyo reported that "Practically all living things, human and animal, were literally seared to death" and people realized it was neither an error, a natural phenomenon, nor just another run-of-the-mill strategic bombing. \\

to:

Despite the absolute destruction wrought by Little Boy, in Hiroshima, it was not immediately apparent to the rest of the country what exactly had happenned.happened. Soon after, Japan's main broadcasting corporation's radio control operator noticed the signal to the Hiroshima station [[DisconnectedByDeath was as dead as,]] well, [[ShapedLikeItself something that has had an atomic bomb dropped on it]]. At military headquarters, many thought it the result of some technical error or meteorological phenomenon, despite the total loss of contact with all stations in and around Hiroshima. It wasn't until August the 8th that Radio Tokyo reported that "Practically all living things, human and animal, were literally seared to death" and people realized it was neither an error, a natural phenomenon, nor just another run-of-the-mill strategic bombing. \\


The choosing of Nagasaki and Hiroshima as the targets was almost a chance event, as there were four potential cities that could be targeted. In particular, Kokura was the intended target for the second bomb (and had been the backup target for the first), [[ForWantOfANail but Nagasaki was attacked instead because of poor visibility over Kokura]]. This has resulted in Kokura being known as a lucky city. As for Hiroshima, many officials had actually been in support of bombing Kyoto, due to its industrial significance, but the city was removed from the target list due to its historical, religious and cultural significance to the Japanese people.[[note]]The removal was mostly the work of one Henry L. Stimson, the Secretary of War at the time, who appealed directly to President Truman to get Kyoto removed; It was no coincidence that Stimson had had his honeymoon in the city, and subsequently had fallen in love with it.[[/note]] Thus, Hiroshima was chosen as the first atomic bombing target. On August 6th, 1945, at 0815 on an already hot summer morning, the B-29 Superfortress ''Enola Gay'' appeared in the skies high above Hiroshima, carrying ''Little Boy'' in her bomb bay. Air raid sirens initially went off, but seeing the small flight of American planes (initially a single weather reconnaissance plane, followed by the strike package consisting of the ''Enola Gay'' and two additional B-29s carrying cameras and airborne instrumentation) and taking it for a scouting mission, the all clear was sounded. Just as people were emerging from their air raid shelters, ''Enola Gay'' Bombardier Thomas Ferebee placed the bombsight's crosshairs over the Aioi Bridge, a unique T-shaped bridge that was essentially right in the middle of the city, and released "Little Boy." Crosswinds caused the bomb to deviate by about 800 feet, but the results were the same regardless; in an instant, "Little Boy" killed 7080,000 people, including 20,000 Japanese military personnel and 20,000 Koreans, and destroyed nearly 48,000 buildings (including the headquarters of the 2nd General Army and Fifth Division). \\

to:

The choosing of Nagasaki and Hiroshima as the targets was almost a chance event, as there were four potential cities that could be targeted. In particular, Kokura was the intended target for the second bomb (and had been the backup target for the first), [[ForWantOfANail but Nagasaki was attacked instead because of poor visibility over Kokura]]. This has resulted in Kokura being known as a lucky city. As for Hiroshima, many officials had actually been in support of bombing Kyoto, due to its industrial significance, but the city was removed from the target list due to its historical, religious and cultural significance to the Japanese people.[[note]]The removal was mostly the work of one Henry L. Stimson, the Secretary of War at the time, who appealed directly to President Truman to get Kyoto removed; It was no coincidence that Stimson had had his honeymoon in the city, and subsequently had fallen in love with it.[[/note]] Thus, Hiroshima was chosen as the first atomic bombing target. On August 6th, 1945, at 0815 8:15 a.m. on an already hot summer morning, the B-29 Superfortress ''Enola Gay'' appeared in the skies high above Hiroshima, carrying ''Little Boy'' in her bomb bay. Air raid sirens initially went off, but seeing the small flight of American planes (initially a single weather reconnaissance plane, followed by the strike package consisting of the ''Enola Gay'' and two additional B-29s carrying cameras and airborne instrumentation) and taking it for a scouting mission, the all clear was sounded. Just as people were emerging from their air raid shelters, ''Enola Gay'' Bombardier Thomas Ferebee placed the bombsight's crosshairs over the Aioi Bridge, a unique T-shaped bridge that was essentially right in the middle of the city, and released "Little Boy." Crosswinds caused the bomb to deviate by about 800 feet, but the results were the same regardless; in an instant, "Little Boy" killed 7080,000 people, including 20,000 Japanese military personnel and 20,000 Koreans, and destroyed nearly 48,000 buildings (including the headquarters of the 2nd General Army and Fifth Division). \\


The choosing of Nagasaki and Hiroshima as the targets was almost a chance event, as there were four potential cities that could be targeted. In particular, Kokura was the intended target for the second bomb (and had been the backup target for the first), [[ForWantOfANail but Nagasaki was attacked instead because of poor visibility over Kokura]]. This has resulted in Kokura being known as a lucky city. As for Hiroshima, many officials had actually been in support of bombing Kyoto, due to its industrial significance, but the city was removed from the target list due to its historical, religious and cultural significance to the Japanese people.[[note]]The removal was mostly the work of one Henry L. Stimson the Secretary of War, who appealed directly to President Truman to get Kyoto removed; It was no coincidence that Stimson had had his honeymoon in the city, and subsequently had fallen in love with it.[[/note]] Thus, Hiroshima was chosen as the first atomic bombing target. On August 6th, 1945, at 0815 on an already hot summer morning, the B-29 Superfortress ''Enola Gay'' appeared in the skies high above Hiroshima, carrying ''Little Boy'' in her bomb bay. Air raid sirens initially went off, but seeing the small flight of American planes (initially a single weather reconnaissance plane, followed by the strike package consisting of the ''Enola Gay'' and two additional B-29s carrying cameras and airborne instrumentation) and taking it for a scouting mission, the all clear was sounded. Just as people were emerging from their air raid shelters, ''Enola Gay'' Bombardier Thomas Ferebee placed the bombsight's crosshairs over the Aioi Bridge, a unique T-shaped bridge that was essentially right in the middle of the city, and released "Little Boy." Crosswinds caused the bomb to deviate by about 800 feet, but the results were the same regardless; in an instant, "Little Boy" killed 7080,000 people, including 20,000 Japanese military personnel and 20,000 Koreans, and destroyed nearly 48,000 buildings (including the headquarters of the 2nd General Army and Fifth Division). \\

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The choosing of Nagasaki and Hiroshima as the targets was almost a chance event, as there were four potential cities that could be targeted. In particular, Kokura was the intended target for the second bomb (and had been the backup target for the first), [[ForWantOfANail but Nagasaki was attacked instead because of poor visibility over Kokura]]. This has resulted in Kokura being known as a lucky city. As for Hiroshima, many officials had actually been in support of bombing Kyoto, due to its industrial significance, but the city was removed from the target list due to its historical, religious and cultural significance to the Japanese people.[[note]]The removal was mostly the work of one Henry L. Stimson Stimson, the Secretary of War, War at the time, who appealed directly to President Truman to get Kyoto removed; It was no coincidence that Stimson had had his honeymoon in the city, and subsequently had fallen in love with it.[[/note]] Thus, Hiroshima was chosen as the first atomic bombing target. On August 6th, 1945, at 0815 on an already hot summer morning, the B-29 Superfortress ''Enola Gay'' appeared in the skies high above Hiroshima, carrying ''Little Boy'' in her bomb bay. Air raid sirens initially went off, but seeing the small flight of American planes (initially a single weather reconnaissance plane, followed by the strike package consisting of the ''Enola Gay'' and two additional B-29s carrying cameras and airborne instrumentation) and taking it for a scouting mission, the all clear was sounded. Just as people were emerging from their air raid shelters, ''Enola Gay'' Bombardier Thomas Ferebee placed the bombsight's crosshairs over the Aioi Bridge, a unique T-shaped bridge that was essentially right in the middle of the city, and released "Little Boy." Crosswinds caused the bomb to deviate by about 800 feet, but the results were the same regardless; in an instant, "Little Boy" killed 7080,000 people, including 20,000 Japanese military personnel and 20,000 Koreans, and destroyed nearly 48,000 buildings (including the headquarters of the 2nd General Army and Fifth Division). \\


The choosing of Nagasaki and Hiroshima as the targets was almost a chance event, as there were four potential cities that could be targeted. In particular, Kokura was the intended target for the second bomb (and had been the backup target for the first), [[ForWantOfANail but Nagasaki was attacked instead because of poor visibility over Kokura]]. This has resulted in Kokura being known as a lucky city. The ''Enola Gay'' dropped the first nuclear device, "Little Boy", on Hiroshima at 8:15 am on the 6th of August, on a hot summer day. Air raid sirens initially went off, but seeing the small flight of American planes (initially a single B-29 weather reconnaissance plane, followed by the strike package consisting of the weapon delivery B-29 ''Enola Gay'' and two B-29s carrying cameras and airborne instrumentation) and taking it for a scouting mission, the all clear was sounded. High above, just as people were emerging from their air raid shelters, ''Enola Gay'' Bombardier Thomas Ferebee placed the bombsight's crosshairs over the Aioi Bridge, a unique T-shaped bridge that was essentially right in the middle of the city, and released "Little Boy." Crosswinds caused the bomb to deviate by about 800 feet, but the results were the same regardless; in an instant, "Little Boy" killed 7080,000 people, including 20,000 Japanese military personnel and 20,000 Koreans, and destroyed nearly 48,000 buildings (including the headquarters of the 2nd General Army and Fifth Division). \\

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The choosing of Nagasaki and Hiroshima as the targets was almost a chance event, as there were four potential cities that could be targeted. In particular, Kokura was the intended target for the second bomb (and had been the backup target for the first), [[ForWantOfANail but Nagasaki was attacked instead because of poor visibility over Kokura]]. This has resulted in Kokura being known as a lucky city. The As for Hiroshima, many officials had actually been in support of bombing Kyoto, due to its industrial significance, but the city was removed from the target list due to its historical, religious and cultural significance to the Japanese people.[[note]]The removal was mostly the work of one Henry L. Stimson the Secretary of War, who appealed directly to President Truman to get Kyoto removed; It was no coincidence that Stimson had had his honeymoon in the city, and subsequently had fallen in love with it.[[/note]] Thus, Hiroshima was chosen as the first atomic bombing target. On August 6th, 1945, at 0815 on an already hot summer morning, the B-29 Superfortress ''Enola Gay'' dropped appeared in the first nuclear device, "Little Boy", on Hiroshima at 8:15 am on the 6th of August, on a hot summer day. skies high above Hiroshima, carrying ''Little Boy'' in her bomb bay. Air raid sirens initially went off, but seeing the small flight of American planes (initially a single B-29 weather reconnaissance plane, followed by the strike package consisting of the weapon delivery B-29 ''Enola Gay'' and two additional B-29s carrying cameras and airborne instrumentation) and taking it for a scouting mission, the all clear was sounded. High above, just Just as people were emerging from their air raid shelters, ''Enola Gay'' Bombardier Thomas Ferebee placed the bombsight's crosshairs over the Aioi Bridge, a unique T-shaped bridge that was essentially right in the middle of the city, and released "Little Boy." Crosswinds caused the bomb to deviate by about 800 feet, but the results were the same regardless; in an instant, "Little Boy" killed 7080,000 people, including 20,000 Japanese military personnel and 20,000 Koreans, and destroyed nearly 48,000 buildings (including the headquarters of the 2nd General Army and Fifth Division). \\


The address is remarkable for several reasons. It was the first public speech ever made by the Emperor, and the first time a majority of his subjects had heard his voice. In extraordinary understatement, he states, "The war situation has developed not necessarily to Japan's advantage." The word "surrender" does not appear once in the Emperor's address. Rather, he states that he has directed his government to, "... accept the provisions of the Joint Declaration." The address is further full of self-justifications, claiming Japan never infringed on the sovereignty of other nations, and that Japan was striving to free East Asia from European imperialism. He also specifically mentions the Atomic Bomb as a reason to accept the Allied provisions, claiming the loss of innocent life would be incalculable otherwise. \\

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The address is remarkable for several reasons. It was the first public speech ever made by the Emperor, and the first time a majority of his subjects had heard his voice. In extraordinary understatement, {{understatement}}, he states, "The war situation has developed not necessarily to Japan's advantage." The word "surrender" does not appear once in the Emperor's address. Rather, he states that he has directed his government to, "... accept the provisions of the Joint Declaration." The address is further full of self-justifications, claiming Japan never infringed on the sovereignty of other nations, and that Japan was striving to free East Asia from European imperialism. He also specifically mentions the Atomic Bomb as a reason to accept the Allied provisions, claiming the loss of innocent life would be incalculable otherwise. \\


Contrary to popular imagination, "Little Boy" did not strike the ground and then detonate like a conventional bomb. It exploded midair and thus the force of the explosion radiated [[SphereOfDestruction in all directions]] -- including down, directly over the Shima Surgical Clinic. Only reinforced concrete structures could withstand the force of the blast and only a few such buildings had been built during the war years. Many individuals out in the streets were vaporized by the light and heat of the blast. Others became covered by third degree burns on their exposed flesh -- not from its heat, but from the light of the explosion. Those wearing clothing had the patterns of their clothes seared into their skin. Anyone unfortunate enough to be looking in the general direction of the blast was either temporarily or permanently blinded by its light. 90% of the doctors and nurses in the city were killed by the blast -- the others needed to come together to try and save the people injured by this revolutionary new weapon. One of the survivors of the bomb was Doctor Terufumi Sasaki. A young man at the time, he quickly took stock of the horrific state of the survivors and began to not just treat them, but more importantly, [[FlingALightIntoTheFuture document their condition and the effectiveness of the treatments the Hiroshima medical teams provided.]] Much of what we know today about [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acute_radiation_syndrome Acute Radiation Syndrome]] comes from Dr. Sasaki's notes. The majority of people within 2,000m (~1 mile) of the blast and not shielded behind concrete walls would succumb to Acute Radiation Syndrome and die within a month. \\

to:

Contrary to popular imagination, "Little Boy" did not strike the ground and then detonate like a conventional bomb. It exploded midair (at about 1850 feet above the ground), and thus the force of the explosion radiated [[SphereOfDestruction in all directions]] -- including down, directly over the Shima Surgical Clinic. Only reinforced concrete structures could withstand the force of the blast and only a few such buildings had been built during the war years. Many individuals out in the streets were vaporized by the light and heat of the blast. Others became covered by third degree burns on their exposed flesh -- not from its heat, but from the light of the explosion. Those wearing clothing had the patterns of their clothes seared into their skin. Anyone unfortunate enough to be looking in the general direction of the blast was either temporarily or permanently blinded by its light. 90% of the doctors and nurses in the city were killed by the blast -- the others needed to come together to try and save the people injured by this revolutionary new weapon. One of the survivors of the bomb was Doctor Terufumi Sasaki. A young man at the time, he quickly took stock of the horrific state of the survivors and began to not just treat them, but more importantly, [[FlingALightIntoTheFuture document their condition and the effectiveness of the treatments the Hiroshima medical teams provided.]] Much of what we know today about [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acute_radiation_syndrome Acute Radiation Syndrome]] comes from Dr. Sasaki's notes. The majority of people within 2,000m (~1 mile) of the blast and not shielded behind concrete walls would succumb to Acute Radiation Syndrome and die within a month. \\


->''I made one great mistake in my life.''

to:

->''I made one great mistake in my life.life, when I signed the letter (written by Leo Szilard, describing the possible use of Uranium as an explosive) to President Roosevelt.''



The choosing of Nagasaki and Hiroshima as the targets was almost a chance event, as there were four potential cities that could be targeted. In particular, Kokura was the intended target for the second bomb (and had been the backup target for the first), [[ForWantOfANail but Nagasaki was attacked instead because of poor visibility over Kokura]]. This has resulted in Kokura being known as a lucky city. The ''Enola Gay'' dropped the first nuclear device, "Little Boy", on Hiroshima at 8:15 am on the 6th of August, on a hot summer day. Air raid sirens initially went off, but seeing the small flight of American planes (initially a single B-29 weather reconnaissance plane, followed by the strike package consisting of the weapon delivery B-29 ''Enola Gay''and two B-29s carrying cameras and airborne instrumentation) and taking it for a scouting mission, the all clear was sounded. High above, just as people were emerging from their air raid shelters, ''Enola Gay'' Bombardier Thomas Ferebee placed the bombsight's crosshairs over the Aioi Bridge, a unique T-shaped bridge that was essentially right in the middle of the city, and released "Little Boy." Crosswinds caused the bomb to deviate by about 800 feet, but the results were the same regardless; in an instant, "Little Boy" killed 7080,000 people, including 20,000 Japanese military personnel and 20,000 Koreans, and destroyed nearly 48,000 buildings (including the headquarters of the 2nd General Army and Fifth Division). \\

to:

The choosing of Nagasaki and Hiroshima as the targets was almost a chance event, as there were four potential cities that could be targeted. In particular, Kokura was the intended target for the second bomb (and had been the backup target for the first), [[ForWantOfANail but Nagasaki was attacked instead because of poor visibility over Kokura]]. This has resulted in Kokura being known as a lucky city. The ''Enola Gay'' dropped the first nuclear device, "Little Boy", on Hiroshima at 8:15 am on the 6th of August, on a hot summer day. Air raid sirens initially went off, but seeing the small flight of American planes (initially a single B-29 weather reconnaissance plane, followed by the strike package consisting of the weapon delivery B-29 ''Enola Gay''and Gay'' and two B-29s carrying cameras and airborne instrumentation) and taking it for a scouting mission, the all clear was sounded. High above, just as people were emerging from their air raid shelters, ''Enola Gay'' Bombardier Thomas Ferebee placed the bombsight's crosshairs over the Aioi Bridge, a unique T-shaped bridge that was essentially right in the middle of the city, and released "Little Boy." Crosswinds caused the bomb to deviate by about 800 feet, but the results were the same regardless; in an instant, "Little Boy" killed 7080,000 people, including 20,000 Japanese military personnel and 20,000 Koreans, and destroyed nearly 48,000 buildings (including the headquarters of the 2nd General Army and Fifth Division). \\


The choosing of Nagasaki and Hiroshima as the targets was almost a chance event, as there were four potential cities that could be targeted. In particular, Kokura was the intended target for the second bomb (and had been the backup target for the first), [[ForWantOfANail but Nagasaki was attacked instead because of poor visibility over Kokura]]. This has resulted in Kokura being known as a lucky city. The ''Enola Gay'' dropped the first nuclear device, "Little Boy", on Hiroshima at 8:15 am on the 6th of August, on a hot summer day. Air raid sirens initially went off, but seeing the small flight of American planes (a weather plane, two fighter escorts, and the ''Enola Gay'') and taking it for a scouting mission, the all clear was sounded. High above, just as people were emerging from their air raid shelters, ''Enola Gay'' Bombardier Thomas Ferebee placed the bombsight's crosshairs over the Aioi Bridge, a unique T-shaped bridge that was essentially right in the middle of the city, and released "Little Boy." Crosswinds caused the bomb to deviate by about 800 feet, but the results were the same regardless; in an instant, "Little Boy" killed 7080,000 people, including 20,000 Japanese military personnel and 20,000 Koreans, and destroyed nearly 48,000 buildings (including the headquarters of the 2nd General Army and Fifth Division). \\

to:

The choosing of Nagasaki and Hiroshima as the targets was almost a chance event, as there were four potential cities that could be targeted. In particular, Kokura was the intended target for the second bomb (and had been the backup target for the first), [[ForWantOfANail but Nagasaki was attacked instead because of poor visibility over Kokura]]. This has resulted in Kokura being known as a lucky city. The ''Enola Gay'' dropped the first nuclear device, "Little Boy", on Hiroshima at 8:15 am on the 6th of August, on a hot summer day. Air raid sirens initially went off, but seeing the small flight of American planes (a (initially a single B-29 weather reconnaissance plane, two fighter escorts, and followed by the strike package consisting of the weapon delivery B-29 ''Enola Gay'') Gay''and two B-29s carrying cameras and airborne instrumentation) and taking it for a scouting mission, the all clear was sounded. High above, just as people were emerging from their air raid shelters, ''Enola Gay'' Bombardier Thomas Ferebee placed the bombsight's crosshairs over the Aioi Bridge, a unique T-shaped bridge that was essentially right in the middle of the city, and released "Little Boy." Crosswinds caused the bomb to deviate by about 800 feet, but the results were the same regardless; in an instant, "Little Boy" killed 7080,000 people, including 20,000 Japanese military personnel and 20,000 Koreans, and destroyed nearly 48,000 buildings (including the headquarters of the 2nd General Army and Fifth Division). \\

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