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* The UsefulNotes/PalmeDOr winners ''Film/{{Shoplifters}}'' (2018) and ''[[Film/Parasite2019 Parasite]]'' (2019) almost feel like a situation where two filmmakers got the same writing prompt, but with slightly different instructions. The prompt would be something like "Put together a full-length film set in your East Asian country's largest city about a poor family living in squalid conditions, who turn to petty crime as a way to deal with their situation, with the question of whether CapitalismIsBad as a running theme. The family must contain a shrewd father figure, a MamaBear mother figure, a young male with HiddenDepths, and a young woman who is skilled at roleplaying. There must be a HalfwayPlotSwitch centered around a [[TheReveal Reveal]] that turns the story on its ear. Also, there must be a scene toward the end with the young male in the hospital recovering from the wounds of a serious injury, [[spoiler:and also a scene where a deceased older woman is buried in the yard of a house by the father figure]]." But ''Shoplifters'' director Creator/HirokazuKoreEda would've gotten the prompt with the added sentence "Do it [[InTheStyleOf as a colorful human drama in a manner reminiscent]] of Creator/CharlesDickens," while ''Parasite'''s Creator/BongJoonHo got the prompt with "Do it as a BlackComedy-laden {{Thriller}}, with {{Horror}} elements, in a manner reminiscent of Creator/AlfredHitchcock."


* ''Film/{{Joker|2019}}'' and ''Film/TheBraveOne'' both feature people who are beaten savagely by a group of people. Both seek to fix what they think is wrong with their city. Both use a gun they attained from extralegal means. And both of them commit their first murders on a subway while being antagonized. The difference is that while [[ComicBook/TheJoker Arthur Fleck]] blames society for the issues he faces, Erica seeks to [[VigilanteMan make her city a safer place]] for the society that lives there. Ironically, the Joker is lifted up by the society he hates, while Erica remains hidden and her actions are never attributed to her. ''The Brave One'' is the optimistic version of ''Joker''.

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* ''Film/{{Joker|2019}}'' and ''Film/TheBraveOne'' both ''Film/{{Joker|2019}}''
** To ''Film/TheBraveOne''. Both
feature people protagonists who are beaten savagely by society and want revenge on a group of people. Both seek to fix what they think is wrong with their city. Both use a gun they attained from extralegal means. And both of them system that wronged them. The films even have the main characters commit their first murders on a subway while being antagonized. The difference is that while [[ComicBook/TheJoker Arthur Fleck]] of ''Joker'' blames society for the issues he faces, Erica of ''The Brave One'' seeks to [[VigilanteMan make her city a safer place]] for the society that lives there. Ironically, the Joker is lifted up by the society he hates, while Erica remains hidden and her actions are never attributed to her. ''The Brave One'' is the optimistic version of ''Joker''.''Joker''.
** Also to the early ''Franchise/DCExtendedUniverse'' films, especially ''Film/BatmanVSupermanDawnOfJustice''. Like Superman, Arthur is depicted as a troubled messianic figure who occasionally adopts the crucifix pose. Also like Batman, he was broken from decades of failure to the point of becoming a nihilist. The similarities end there, as Arthur descends into madness and evil while the aforementioned characters find HeroicResolve and eventually overcome their existential crisis to become/revert back to becoming heroes. While the World's Finest heroes in the DCEU are shaped into the best versions of themselves by their families and friends, Arthur is corrupted by these same influences.


** ''The Birth of a Nation'' (1915) by D.W. Griffith and ''Film/TheBirthOfANation2016'' by Nate Parker. The clash of values is similar to the above example with ''Intolerance'', but even more explicit considering the black slave motif and the title reference.

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** * ''The Birth of a Nation'' (1915) by D.W. Griffith and ''Film/TheBirthOfANation2016'' by Nate Parker. The clash of values is similar to the above example with ''Intolerance'', but even more explicit considering the black slave motif and the title reference.



* Creator/StevenSpielberg produced ''Film/{{Poltergeist}}'' (directed by Creator/TobeHooper) at the same time as he was making ''Film/ETTheExtraTerrestrial'' to contrast each other. He described ''ET'' as the Suburban Dream... and ''Poltergeist'' as the Suburban Nightmare.
** By the same token, ''Film/ETTheExtraTerrestrial'' can be considered a spiritual antithesis to Spielberg's earlier film ''Film/CloseEncountersOfTheThirdKind.'' They're both science fiction films about suburban everymen encountering aliens and tangling with government agents, but ''Close Encounters'' is a thriller about a suburban man embracing his inner child as he tries to understand the boundless mysteries of space, while ''E.T.'' is a light-hearted ComingOfAgeStory about a suburban boy bonding with an all-too-human alien--who spends most of the movie trying to understand the mysteries of ''Earth''.
*** As a few critics have noted, it's also very thematically fitting that, while Roy Neary of ''Close Encounters'' essentially abandons his wife and children in the end [[spoiler: [[AndTheAdventureContinues to explore the cosmos with his new alien friends]]]], ''E.T.'''s Elliott is the child of divorced parents with a DisappearedDad--and the movie ends with him reluctantly letting E.T. go back to his home planet while he stays behind with his family on Earth.

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* Creator/StevenSpielberg Creator/StevenSpielberg
** Spielberg
produced ''Film/{{Poltergeist}}'' (directed by Creator/TobeHooper) at the same time as he was making ''Film/ETTheExtraTerrestrial'' to contrast each other. He described ''ET'' as the Suburban Dream... and ''Poltergeist'' as the Suburban Nightmare.
** By the same token, ''Film/ETTheExtraTerrestrial'' **''Film/ETTheExtraTerrestrial'' can be considered a spiritual antithesis to Spielberg's earlier film ''Film/CloseEncountersOfTheThirdKind.'' They're both science fiction films about suburban everymen encountering aliens and tangling with government agents, but ''Close Encounters'' is a thriller about a suburban man embracing his inner child as he tries to understand the boundless mysteries of space, while ''E.T.'' is a light-hearted ComingOfAgeStory about a suburban boy bonding with an all-too-human alien--who spends most of the movie trying to understand the mysteries of ''Earth''.
*** As a few critics have noted, it's also very thematically fitting that, while Roy Neary of ''Close Encounters'' essentially abandons his wife and children in the end [[spoiler: [[AndTheAdventureContinues to explore the cosmos with his new alien friends]]]], ''E.T.'''s Elliott is the child of divorced parents with a DisappearedDad--and the movie ends with him reluctantly letting E.T. go back to his home planet while he stays behind with his family on Earth.
''Earth''.



* Creator/LindsayEllis, in [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Radg-Kn0jLs a video]] on the "thirty-year cycle" of nostalgia, gave two examples of this {{trope}}.
** The first was ''Film/TheyLive'' and ''Film/{{Ghostbusters 1984}}'', specifically in terms of their political leanings. Both are sci-fi action films with a comedic/satirical undercurrent, but while ''Ghostbusters'' is a very pro-capitalist and pro-business film, with the heroes being men who use their technology to go into private enterprise and have to contend with an ObstructiveBureaucrat trying to shut them down (with disastrous results), ''They Live'' is a vicious satire of consumer capitalism, presented as an instrument for an alien ruling class to TakeOverTheWorld.
** The second was ''Film/{{It 2017}}'' and the TV show ''Series/StrangerThings''. Both are horror stories set in TheEighties and featuring casts composed predominantly of children that draw heavily on the audience's nostalgia for that time period and its pop culture, particularly the works of Creator/StephenKing (''It'' is an adaptation of [[Literature/{{It}} one of his novels]]) and kids' adventure films like ''Film/TheGoonies'', ''Film/ETTheExtraTerrestrial'', and ''Film/TheMonsterSquad''. However, while ''Stranger Things'' leans fully into nostalgia, with many of the more [[ValuesDissonance unpalatable elements]] of the time either [[PoliticallyCorrectHistory removed from the picture]] or [[PoliticallyIncorrectVillain given to the bad guys]], ''It'' is more {{deconstruction}}ist in its approach, combining the classic pop iconography of the '80s with the bullying, bigotry, and fear of crime that also permeated the culture.

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* Creator/LindsayEllis, in [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Radg-Kn0jLs a video]] on the "thirty-year cycle" of nostalgia, gave two examples of this {{trope}}.
** The first was
''Film/TheyLive'' and ''Film/{{Ghostbusters 1984}}'', specifically in terms of their political leanings. Both are sci-fi action films with a comedic/satirical undercurrent, but while ''Ghostbusters'' is a very pro-capitalist and pro-business film, with the heroes being men who use their technology to go into private enterprise and have to contend with an ObstructiveBureaucrat trying to shut them down (with disastrous results), ''They Live'' is a vicious satire of consumer capitalism, presented as an instrument for an alien ruling class to TakeOverTheWorld.
** The second was * ''Film/{{It 2017}}'' and the TV show ''Series/StrangerThings''. Both are horror stories set in TheEighties and featuring casts composed predominantly of children that draw heavily on the audience's nostalgia for that time period and its pop culture, particularly the works of Creator/StephenKing (''It'' is an adaptation of [[Literature/{{It}} one of his novels]]) and kids' adventure films like ''Film/TheGoonies'', ''Film/ETTheExtraTerrestrial'', and ''Film/TheMonsterSquad''. However, while ''Stranger Things'' leans fully into nostalgia, with many of the more [[ValuesDissonance unpalatable elements]] of the time either [[PoliticallyCorrectHistory removed from the picture]] or [[PoliticallyIncorrectVillain given to the bad guys]], ''It'' is more {{deconstruction}}ist in its approach, combining the classic pop iconography of the '80s with the bullying, bigotry, and fear of crime that also permeated the culture.



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* Cassandra Cain in ''Film/BirdsOfPrey2020'' is this to Billy Batson in ''Film/Shazam2019''. Both are {{Kid Hero}}es with {{Alliterative Name}}s who have foster parents and get pulled into superheroics, but whereas Billy got a loving surrogate family and became a superhero in his own right [[spoiler:and the leader of a team of such]], Cass instead got a foster couple who are only heard offscreen yelling at each other in one scene, causing her to turn to a life of petty crime and later become the sidekick to ComicBook/HarleyQuinn.


* ''People's Republic of Desire'' is one to ''Disney/RalphBreaksTheInternet'' due to former's much more cynical take on online content creation. While People's Republic of Desire is a documentary and ''Ralph Breaks The Internet'' is a family cartoon, they both follow characters entering the world of online content creation in order to make money to preserve their way of life. However, where Ralph stumbles into fame and succeeds in his original goal with the help of the platform and bows out when he's done. The streamers in People's Republic of Desire struggle against one another and are ultimately exploited by the platform they use with they're attempts to maintain their fame fail as they're replaced by other streamers.

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* ''People's Republic of Desire'' is one to ''Disney/RalphBreaksTheInternet'' ''WesternAnimation/RalphBreaksTheInternet'' due to former's much more cynical take on online content creation. While People's Republic of Desire is a documentary and ''Ralph Breaks The Internet'' is a family cartoon, they both follow characters entering the world of online content creation in order to make money to preserve their way of life. However, where Ralph stumbles into fame and succeeds in his original goal with the help of the platform and bows out when he's done. The streamers in People's Republic of Desire struggle against one another and are ultimately exploited by the platform they use with they're attempts to maintain their fame fail as they're replaced by other streamers.


* ''Film/{{Deadpool}}'' and ''Film/{{Logan}}''. Both are graphically violent R-rated spin-offs from the existing ''[[Film/XMenFilmSeries X-Men]]'' cinematic universe. However, ''Deadpool'' is a BloodyHilarious, cheerfully amoral black comedy with a fourth-wall-breaking FirstPersonSmartass, while ''Logan'' is an elegiac modern western that is mostly about two beloved characters from the earlier films getting old and dying.

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* ''Film/{{Deadpool}}'' ''Film/{{Deadpool|2016}}'' and ''Film/{{Logan}}''. Both are graphically violent R-rated spin-offs from the existing ''[[Film/XMenFilmSeries X-Men]]'' cinematic universe. However, ''Deadpool'' is a BloodyHilarious, cheerfully amoral black comedy with a fourth-wall-breaking FirstPersonSmartass, while ''Logan'' is an elegiac modern western that is mostly about two beloved characters from the earlier films getting old and dying.


* ''Film/TheHighwaymen'' is an anti-thesis to ''Film/BonnieAndClyde'' and other films that [[DamnItFeelsGoodToBeAGangster glamorized]] the OutlawCouple pair by depicting them as free-spirited {{Loveable Rogue}}s. Clyde Barrow and Bonnie Parker are never shown up close until their death scene, only seen from afar as they're robbing civilians and graphically murdering police officers, as if all we're seeing is eyewitness testimonies of their worst crimes. Additionally, the actual main characters, Frank Hamer and Maney Gault, two seasoned Texas Rangers, are depicted as quite methodical and ruthless in their quest to hunt down the two without any attempt to whitewash their actions, and are even depicted as pretty boring everyday people. For them, it's just a job like any other and unlike Bonnie and Clyde, they're not in it for the glory.

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* ''Film/TheHighwaymen'' is an anti-thesis to ''Film/BonnieAndClyde'' and other films that [[DamnItFeelsGoodToBeAGangster glamorized]] the OutlawCouple pair by depicting them as free-spirited {{Loveable Rogue}}s.Rogue}}s (a glamour that is mostly still lasting today). Clyde Barrow and Bonnie Parker are never shown up close until their death scene, only seen from afar as they're robbing civilians and graphically murdering police officers, as if all we're seeing is eyewitness testimonies of their worst crimes. Additionally, the actual main characters, Frank Hamer and Maney Gault, two seasoned Texas Rangers, are depicted as [[PragmaticHero quite methodical and ruthless ruthless]] in their quest to hunt down the two without any attempt to whitewash their actions, and are even depicted as pretty boring everyday people. For them, it's just a job like any other and unlike Bonnie and Clyde, they're not in it for the glory.



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* [[Creator/AdamAndJoe Joe Cornish]] created ''Film/AttackTheBlock'' as [[https://archive.list.co.uk/the-list/2011-04-28/18/ a response]] to the British "hoodie horror" films of the 2000s like ''Film/HarryBrown'', ''Film/EdenLake'', and ''Film/{{Heartless}}'', in which [[LowerClassLout young, lower-class delinquents from the inner cities]] were portrayed as sadistic villains. In this film, the street toughs were instead the heroes battling an AlienInvasion.
-->"This is certainly a reaction to [those] often brilliantly-made and well-crafted movies that I think take a slightly inhuman approach to an issue that, actually, involves very young kids. I think that's the easy option, to take something in the world that already is {{demoni|zation}}sed and frightens people, and just make it even more scary and horrible. ... I don't think it's an incredibly radical premise to try and have sympathy for someone who has made a mistake. I think you'll find it in Literature/{{the Bible}} quite a lot, and in various faiths; for me it's quite a simple dramatic premise, and I'd be alarmed if contemporary society decided that it could only have absolutely clean-cut, morally pure characters in its narratives. If you went through the history of art and literature doing that, you'd lose most of it!"


* Music/IceCube [[https://www.complex.com/covers/oral-history-of-friday-20th-anniversary/ felt]] that many of the {{hood film}}s of the early '90s were pointlessly grim, gave off a bad image, and missed the fun that a lot of people had growing up in places like South Central, so he wrote ''Film/{{Friday}}'' as a LighterAndSofter version of that material. Its plot, about two guys having to pay back a psychotic drug dealer who they owe money to, could be taken from any number of contemporary urban crime dramas... except it's a StonerFlick in which all of that is PlayedForLaughs, the inciting incident being one of the main characters smoking all the weed he was supposed to sell.

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* Music/IceCube [[https://www.complex.com/covers/oral-history-of-friday-20th-anniversary/ felt]] that many of the {{hood film}}s of the early '90s (including some that he had starred in) were [[DarknessInducedAudienceApathy pointlessly grim, grim]], gave off a bad image, image of urban communities as {{Vice Cit|y}}ies, and missed the fun that a lot of people had growing up in places like South Central, so he wrote ''Film/{{Friday}}'' as a LighterAndSofter version of that material. Its plot, about two guys having to pay back a psychotic drug dealer who they owe money to, could be taken from any number of contemporary urban crime dramas... except it's a StonerFlick in which all of that is PlayedForLaughs, the inciting incident being one of the main characters smoking all the weed he was supposed to sell.



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* Music/IceCube [[https://www.complex.com/covers/oral-history-of-friday-20th-anniversary/ felt]] that many of the {{hood film}}s of the early '90s were pointlessly grim, gave off a bad image, and missed the fun that a lot of people had growing up in places like South Central, so he wrote ''Film/{{Friday}}'' as a LighterAndSofter version of that material. Its plot, about two guys having to pay back a psychotic drug dealer who they owe money to, could be taken from any number of contemporary urban crime dramas... except it's a StonerFlick in which all of that is PlayedForLaughs, the inciting incident being one of the main characters smoking all the weed he was supposed to sell.
-->"In the hood, they was doing movies like ''Film/BoyzNTheHood'', which I did, ''Film/MenaceIISociety'', ''South Central'', and even ''Film/{{Colors}}'', going back that far. Everybody was looking at our neighborhood like it was [[ViceCity hell on Earth]], like the worst place you can grow up in America. And Iím like, why? I didnít see it all that way. I mean, I knew it was crazy around where I grew up but we had fun in the hood. We used to trip off the neighborhood."


* Film/{{Joker|2019}} and Film/TheBraveOne both feature people who are beaten savagely by a group of people. Both seek to fix what they think is wrong with their city. Both use a gun they attained from extralegal means. And Both of them commit their first murders on a subway while being antagonized. The difference is that while Joker blames society for the issues he faces, Erica seeks to make her city a safer place for the society that lives there. Ironically, Joker is lifted up by the society he hates, while Erica remains hidden and her actions are never attributed to her. The Brave One is the optimistic version of The Joker

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* Film/{{Joker|2019}} ''Film/{{Joker|2019}}'' and Film/TheBraveOne ''Film/TheBraveOne'' both feature people who are beaten savagely by a group of people. Both seek to fix what they think is wrong with their city. Both use a gun they attained from extralegal means. And Both both of them commit their first murders on a subway while being antagonized. The difference is that while Joker [[ComicBook/TheJoker Arthur Fleck]] blames society for the issues he faces, Erica seeks to [[VigilanteMan make her city a safer place place]] for the society that lives there. Ironically, the Joker is lifted up by the society he hates, while Erica remains hidden and her actions are never attributed to her. The ''The Brave One One'' is the optimistic version of The Joker''Joker''.


*** ''Film/SuicideSquad'' to ''Film/GuardiansOfTheGalaxy''. Both are films where the main characters are criminals who are brought together to defeat a greater evil while the primary heroes of the respective universes (the Justice League and the Avengers) aren't involved. Although the Guardians weren't as corrupt, and willingly opposed Ronan, the Squad were criminals who were promised freedom if they helped defeat the Enchantress. For their lead females, Gamora couldn't agree to Thanos destroying worlds, but Harley was still loyal to The Joker. Also, the Guardians get their criminal records expunged, while the Squad do not get their promised freedom, though Deadshot does get to spend time with his daughter. Incidentally, ''Guardians of the Galaxy'' and ''Suicide Squad'''s sequel are both directed and written by Creator/JamesGunn.

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*** ''Film/SuicideSquad'' ''Film/SuicideSquad2016'' to ''Film/GuardiansOfTheGalaxy''. Both are films where the main characters are criminals who are brought together to defeat a greater evil while the primary heroes of the respective universes (the Justice League and the Avengers) aren't involved. Although the Guardians weren't as corrupt, and willingly opposed Ronan, the Squad were criminals who were promised freedom if they helped defeat the Enchantress. For their lead females, Gamora couldn't agree to Thanos destroying worlds, but Harley was still loyal to The Joker. Also, the Guardians get their criminal records expunged, while the Squad do not get their promised freedom, though Deadshot does get to spend time with his daughter. Incidentally, ''Guardians of the Galaxy'' and ''Suicide Squad'''s sequel are both directed and written by Creator/JamesGunn.


* Creator/PaulVerhoeven did this to himself once, too. One of the first films he directed back in the 70s was a Dutch Epic War Film called ''Film/SoldaatVanOranje'' (by now ''the'' quintessential Dutch epic film). It involved the Dutch resistance bravely playing cat and mouse with the unscrupulous Nazi occupiers to achieve freedom. Then, after having spent decades in Hollywood, Verhoeven returned in 2006 to direct his last film - ''Film/{{Zwartboek}}''. The premise and plot are uncannily similar, except that the idealism levels are exactly ''nil''. [[UpToEleven The Nazis are even more brutal]], [[HeWhoFightsMonsters the Resistance are deeply corrupt and bigoted themselves]], everyone turns on each other, 'KillEmAll' is in full effect, and even the ''end of the war'' doesn't hamper the conflict. It's a very bitter foil to ''Soldaat's'' freedom-fighting heroism.

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* Creator/PaulVerhoeven did this to himself once, too. One of the first films he directed back in the 70s was a Dutch Epic War Film called ''Film/SoldaatVanOranje'' ''Film/SoldierOfOrange'' (by now ''the'' quintessential Dutch epic film). It involved the Dutch resistance bravely playing cat and mouse with the unscrupulous Nazi occupiers to achieve freedom. Then, after having spent decades in Hollywood, Verhoeven returned in 2006 to direct his last film - ''Film/{{Zwartboek}}''. The premise and plot are uncannily similar, except that the idealism levels are exactly ''nil''. [[UpToEleven The Nazis are even more brutal]], [[HeWhoFightsMonsters the Resistance are deeply corrupt and bigoted themselves]], everyone turns on each other, 'KillEmAll' is in full effect, and even the ''end of the war'' doesn't hamper the conflict. It's a very bitter foil to ''Soldaat's'' ''Soldier's'' freedom-fighting heroism.

Added DiffLines:

* Film/{{Joker|2019}} and Film/TheBraveOne both feature people who are beaten savagely by a group of people. Both seek to fix what they think is wrong with their city. Both use a gun they attained from extralegal means. And Both of them commit their first murders on a subway while being antagonized. The difference is that while Joker blames society for the issues he faces, Erica seeks to make her city a safer place for the society that lives there. Ironically, Joker is lifted up by the society he hates, while Erica remains hidden and her actions are never attributed to her. The Brave One is the optimistic version of The Joker


*** ''Film/SuicideSquad'' to ''Film/GuardiansOfTheGalaxy''. Both are films where the main characters are criminals who are brought together to defeat a greater evil while the primary heroes of the respective universes (the Justice League and the Avengers) aren't involved. Although the Guardians weren't as corrupt, and willingly opposed Ronan, the Squad were criminals who were promised freedom if they helped defeat the Enchantress. For their lead females, Gamora couldn't agree to Thanos destroying worlds, but Harley was still loyal to The Joker. Also, the Guardians get their criminal records expunged, while the Squad do not get their promised freedom, though Deadshot does get to spend time with his daughter.

to:

*** ''Film/SuicideSquad'' to ''Film/GuardiansOfTheGalaxy''. Both are films where the main characters are criminals who are brought together to defeat a greater evil while the primary heroes of the respective universes (the Justice League and the Avengers) aren't involved. Although the Guardians weren't as corrupt, and willingly opposed Ronan, the Squad were criminals who were promised freedom if they helped defeat the Enchantress. For their lead females, Gamora couldn't agree to Thanos destroying worlds, but Harley was still loyal to The Joker. Also, the Guardians get their criminal records expunged, while the Squad do not get their promised freedom, though Deadshot does get to spend time with his daughter. Incidentally, ''Guardians of the Galaxy'' and ''Suicide Squad'''s sequel are both directed and written by Creator/JamesGunn.

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