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* The pilot episode opens with Mitch [=McDeere=] carrying a briefcase while running from someone, before flashing back to "six weeks earlier". At the end of the episode it flashes forward again to show a bit more of the chase scene. This is continued in subsequent episodes, but eventually the timeline of the episodes catches up with and passes the events shown in the bookends... and then the final scene of the first season finale flashes forward to "six weeks later" to show him fleeing a building with a ''different'' briefcase.


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** The pilot episode opens with Mitch [=McDeere=] carrying a briefcase while running from someone, before flashing back to "six weeks earlier". At the end of the episode it flashes forward again to show a bit more of the chase scene. This is continued in subsequent episodes, but eventually the timeline of the episodes catches up with and passes the events shown in the bookends... and then the final scene of the first season finale flashes forward to "six weeks later" to show him fleeing a building with a ''different'' briefcase.


* The pilot episode opens with Mitch McDeere carrying a briefcase while running from someone, before flashing back to "six weeks earlier". At the end of the episode it flashes forward again to show a bit more of the chase scene. This is continued in subsequent episodes, but eventually the timeline of the episodes catches up with and passes the events shown in the bookends... and then the final scene of the first season finale flashes forward to "six weeks later" to show him fleeing a building with a ''different'' briefcase.

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* The pilot episode opens with Mitch McDeere [=McDeere=] carrying a briefcase while running from someone, before flashing back to "six weeks earlier". At the end of the episode it flashes forward again to show a bit more of the chase scene. This is continued in subsequent episodes, but eventually the timeline of the episodes catches up with and passes the events shown in the bookends... and then the final scene of the first season finale flashes forward to "six weeks later" to show him fleeing a building with a ''different'' briefcase.

Added DiffLines:

* The pilot episode opens with Mitch McDeere carrying a briefcase while running from someone, before flashing back to "six weeks earlier". At the end of the episode it flashes forward again to show a bit more of the chase scene. This is continued in subsequent episodes, but eventually the timeline of the episodes catches up with and passes the events shown in the bookends... and then the final scene of the first season finale flashes forward to "six weeks later" to show him fleeing a building with a ''different'' briefcase.

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* HowWeGotHere: Each episode is structured this way, except that it takes about 5 or 6 weeks' worth of episodes to finally "get here", at which point they just flash forward to another "here" that it'll take another month and a half or so to "get to".
* InMediasRes: Every. Single. Episode.


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* OnceAnEpisode: We start on a tense action sequence that overlaps the cliffhanger from the previous week. Then flashback to ''n'' weeks ago to explain that episode's piece of the HowWeGotHere story. That takes up most of the episode until we finally return to ''n'' weeks later, which gives us a few more seconds of action beyond where we left off, and then... ToBeContinued.

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* StealTheSurroundings: Ray has to steal data off of a security system by "[[HollywoodHacking Going to the C drive and getting root access]]". He can't do it and just grabs the whole computer.
** Done again in another episode, where a few thugs are looking for a hard drive at a hacker's house, but as "the place is like a friggin' Radio Shack", they think it is HiddenInPlainSight, so they start stealing everything to sort it out when they get back..


!!This series provides examples of:

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!!This !!The series provides examples of:of:



* HollywoodHacking: The show has a general case of not understanding how computers work, and even less so how those computers are connected. In one episode, Tammy, who calls herself the most tech-savvy of the group, spouts some alleged TechnoBabble about how to download a file. In another, she's proud about having been able to track down an IP that leads them to new clues about their case. That IP? 192.168.1.1.

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* ContinuityLockout: The pilot episode dispenses with most of the {{Expospeak}} and assumes viewers have seen the 1993 film or read the novel.
* HollywoodHacking: The show has a general case of not understanding how computers work, and even less so how those computers are connected. In one episode, Tammy, who calls herself the most tech-savvy of the group, spouts some alleged TechnoBabble about how to download a file. In another, she's proud about having been able to track down an IP that leads them to new clues about their case. That IP? 192.168.1.1. (the standard set of numbers used by most routers as the default IP address).
* NewJobEpisode: The pilot episode. Mitch is attempting to run a small law firm out of the back of a travel office before getting integrated with a bigger law firm by the episode's end.
* {{Rewrite}}: In the film, Mitch severed his ties with the firm without revealing the mob's involvement (and specifically told the head of the Morolito family that he had saved them from being ripped off for millions as a result). The series changes the story so that the Morolito heads were imprisoned as a result of the investigation, with the son of one of the mobsters swearing revenge on Mitch after his father's death.
** This is actually a rewrite of a rewrite. In the novel, Mitch and Abby end up in lifelong exile in the Caribbean.
* TheScrappy: In-universe. Mitch's fledgling firm is considered to be this by every other law firm in the Washington area. Kinross & Clark brings him in for ulterior reasons.
* StartMyOwn: Mitch starts his own firm in the pilot episode, only to integrate into Kinross & Clark.
* TimeSkip: The television series takes place a decade after the events of the film.
* WitnessProtection: It is revealed that Mitch and his family were under protection from the Feds for the past decade, and have only emerged at the beginning of the series.

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[[quoteright:300:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/Firm_Logo_3522.jpg]]
A 2012 Canadian television series that airs on NBC in the USA, serving as a sequel to the [[Film/TheFirm film of the same name]], which was based on the book of the same name. The series takes place a decade after the events of ''Film/TheFirm'', where Mitch [=McDeere=] and his family, now living in DC, leave witness protection while he starts his own law firm, and soon starts a partnership with the shady law firm, ''Kinross & Clark''.
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!!This series provides examples of:
*BigBrotherWorship: One of Mitch's cases involved a mentally-challenged boy who completely loved his BigBrotherBully and was willing to go to jail for him.
*TheConspiracy: Right from the start of the first episode, Mitch is the target of two completely independent conspiracies:
**The Chicago mob he testified against over a decade ago has found out he is alive, and are secretly following him and plotting to kill him.
**The firm he has partnered with wants to cover up a pro bono case Mitch has been assigned to, because it has some connection to a DarkSecret that several of the firm's partners are in on.
*HollywoodHacking: The show has a general case of not understanding how computers work, and even less so how those computers are connected. In one episode, Tammy, who calls herself the most tech-savvy of the group, spouts some alleged TechnoBabble about how to download a file. In another, she's proud about having been able to track down an IP that leads them to new clues about their case. That IP? 192.168.1.1.
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