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The premise of the show is (somewhat) simple enough: it follows the adventures of a [[HumanAlien humanoid alien]] -- the Doctor -- and their various companions through time and space. The Doctor is a renegade of sorts, having left their home planet of Gallifrey, and travels around the universe in a [[SapientShip living and sentient]] {{time machine}}, the TARDIS (Time And Relative Dimensions In Space), and meets many foes, ranging from heavily armoured robots to killer microbes to members of the Doctor's own race, the Time Lords. Part of the longevity of the series is that when the actor playing the Doctor leaves, the show gets around this by killing the character off, only to [[TheNthDoctor "regenerate" the Doctor into a new form played by someone else]] (sometimes by someone significantly older or younger, or a different gender). As a result, the same character has appeared in the series from the beginning, but their new personality and new tastes give the show [[{{Retool}} a distinctly different atmosphere]] with each regeneration, leading the producers (and, often, fans) to treat the introduction of a new Doctor as a soft relaunch of the series. The show also frequently changes companions - over its history, only a relative handful have ever actually stayed longer than one or two seasons -- and once again the change in companion is also treated as something of a relaunch, especially in the 2005-present era, where the stories are more frequently told from their perspective.

to:

The premise of the show is (somewhat) simple enough: it follows the adventures of a [[HumanAlien humanoid alien]] -- the Doctor -- and their various companions through time and space. The Doctor is a renegade of sorts, having left their home planet of Gallifrey, and travels around the universe in a [[SapientShip living and sentient]] {{time machine}}, the TARDIS (Time And Relative Dimensions In Space), and meets many foes, ranging from heavily armoured robots to killer microbes to members of the Doctor's own race, the Time Lords. Part of the longevity of the series is that when the actor playing the Doctor leaves, the show gets around this by killing the character off, only to [[TheNthDoctor "regenerate" the Doctor into a new form played by someone else]] (sometimes by someone significantly older or younger, or a different gender). As a result, the same character has appeared in the series from the beginning, but their new personality and new tastes give the show [[{{Retool}} a distinctly different atmosphere]] with each regeneration, leading the producers (and, often, fans) to treat the introduction of a new Doctor as a soft relaunch of the series. The show also frequently changes companions - over its history, only a relative handful have ever actually stayed longer than one or two seasons -- and once again the change in companion is also treated as something of a relaunch, especially in the 2005-present era, where the stories are more frequently told from their perspective.



''Doctor Who'' is a British institution and considered a key part of British culture: even [[UsefulNotes/HMTheQueen The Queen]] herself is a fan, and threw the show a ''birthday party'' in her ''palace'' for its 50th anniversary in 2013. It is also notable that Michael Grade, the BBC Controller when the show originally went off the air in 1989 and a vocal critic of the classic series (thus leading him to be the one most commonly blamed for cancelling ''Doctor Who''), is the only BBC Controller ''not'' to have received a knighthood-- [[SarcasmMode entirely coincidentally, we're sure.]][[note]]Normally, we Brits and the Queen are ''above'' pettiness. In this case... well...[[/note]] In addition, the Royal Mail honoured the show's anniversary with a set of stamps, one for each Doctor (and the TARDIS) plus the show's villains.

It's also worth noting that a significant amount of the show's appeal lies in its remarkable ability to veer between being a genuine masterpiece of British television to being some of the most ridiculous buffoonery ever put onto BBC airwaves-- oftentimes within the same episode. This is especially true for the first 26 seasons, whose far lower budget and constrained shooting schedules could lend to some particularly amusing blunders in terms of effects, acting, writing, set design, etc. That's not to say that the Revival Series doesn't have its share of snark-worthy moments, but the Classic Series is where it's most prominent. Again though, taking amusement in its less stellar moments is part of the appeal, especially for hardcore fans-- to the point where you could describe ''Doctor Who'' as "NarmCharm: The Show"-- and as such you can find a good amount of ribbing on this wiki's various pages regarding ''Doctor Who'', done by fans, for fans, and all in good fun.

to:

''Doctor Who'' is a British institution and considered a key part of British culture: even [[UsefulNotes/HMTheQueen The Queen]] herself is a fan, and threw the show a ''birthday party'' in her ''palace'' for its 50th anniversary in 2013. It is also notable that Michael Grade, the BBC Controller when the show originally went off the air in 1989 and a vocal critic of the classic series (thus leading him to be the one most commonly blamed for cancelling ''Doctor Who''), is the only BBC Controller ''not'' to have received a knighthood-- knighthood [[SarcasmMode entirely coincidentally, we're sure.]][[note]]Normally, we Brits and the Queen are ''above'' pettiness. In this case... well...[[/note]] In addition, the Royal Mail honoured the show's anniversary with a set of stamps, one for each Doctor (and the TARDIS) plus the show's villains.

It's also worth noting that a significant amount of the show's appeal lies in its remarkable ability to veer between being a genuine masterpiece of British television to being some of the most ridiculous buffoonery ever put onto BBC airwaves-- airwaves oftentimes within the same episode. This is especially true for the first 26 seasons, whose far lower budget and constrained shooting schedules could lend to some particularly amusing blunders in terms of effects, acting, writing, set design, etc. That's not to say that the Revival Series doesn't have its share of snark-worthy moments, but the Classic Series is where it's most prominent. Again though, taking amusement in its less stellar moments is part of the appeal, especially for hardcore fans-- fans to the point where you could describe ''Doctor Who'' as "NarmCharm: The Show"-- Show" and as such you can find a good amount of ribbing on this wiki's various pages regarding ''Doctor Who'', done by fans, for fans, and all in good fun.


It's also worth noting that a significant amount of the show's appeal lies in its remarkable ability to veer between being a genuine masterpiece of British television to being some of the most ridiculous buffoonery ever put onto BBC airwaves-- oftentimes within the same episode. This is especially true for the first 26 seasons, whose far lower budget and constrained shooting schedules could lend to some particularly amusing blunders in terms of effects, acting, writing, set design, etc. That's not to say that the Revival Series doesn't have its share of snark-worthy moments, but the Classic Series is where it's most prominent. Again though, taking amusement in its less stellar moments is part of the appeal, especially for hardcore fans, and as such you can find a good amount of ribbing on this wiki's various pages regarding ''Doctor Who'', done by fans, for fans, and all in good fun.

to:

It's also worth noting that a significant amount of the show's appeal lies in its remarkable ability to veer between being a genuine masterpiece of British television to being some of the most ridiculous buffoonery ever put onto BBC airwaves-- oftentimes within the same episode. This is especially true for the first 26 seasons, whose far lower budget and constrained shooting schedules could lend to some particularly amusing blunders in terms of effects, acting, writing, set design, etc. That's not to say that the Revival Series doesn't have its share of snark-worthy moments, but the Classic Series is where it's most prominent. Again though, taking amusement in its less stellar moments is part of the appeal, especially for hardcore fans, fans-- to the point where you could describe ''Doctor Who'' as "NarmCharm: The Show"-- and as such you can find a good amount of ribbing on this wiki's various pages regarding ''Doctor Who'', done by fans, for fans, and all in good fun.


''Doctor Who'' is a British institution and considered a key part of British culture: even [[UsefulNotes/HMTheQueen The Queen]] herself is a fan, and threw the show a ''birthday party'' in her ''palace'' for its 50th anniversary in 2013. It is also notable that Michael Grade, the BBC Controller when the show originally went off the air in 1989 and a vocal critic of the classic series (thus leading him to be the one most commonly blamed for cancelling ''Doctor Who''), is the only BBC Controller ''not'' to have received a knighthood-- [[SarcasmMode entirely coincidentally, we're sure.]][[note]]Normally, we Brits and the Queen are ''above'' pettiness. In this case... well...[[/note]] In addition, the Royal Mail honoured the show's anniversary with a set of stamps one for each Doctor (and the TARDIS) plus the show's villains.

to:

''Doctor Who'' is a British institution and considered a key part of British culture: even [[UsefulNotes/HMTheQueen The Queen]] herself is a fan, and threw the show a ''birthday party'' in her ''palace'' for its 50th anniversary in 2013. It is also notable that Michael Grade, the BBC Controller when the show originally went off the air in 1989 and a vocal critic of the classic series (thus leading him to be the one most commonly blamed for cancelling ''Doctor Who''), is the only BBC Controller ''not'' to have received a knighthood-- [[SarcasmMode entirely coincidentally, we're sure.]][[note]]Normally, we Brits and the Queen are ''above'' pettiness. In this case... well...[[/note]] In addition, the Royal Mail honoured the show's anniversary with a set of stamps stamps, one for each Doctor (and the TARDIS) plus the show's villains.villains.

It's also worth noting that a significant amount of the show's appeal lies in its remarkable ability to veer between being a genuine masterpiece of British television to being some of the most ridiculous buffoonery ever put onto BBC airwaves-- oftentimes within the same episode. This is especially true for the first 26 seasons, whose far lower budget and constrained shooting schedules could lend to some particularly amusing blunders in terms of effects, acting, writing, set design, etc. That's not to say that the Revival Series doesn't have its share of snark-worthy moments, but the Classic Series is where it's most prominent. Again though, taking amusement in its less stellar moments is part of the appeal, especially for hardcore fans, and as such you can find a good amount of ribbing on this wiki's various pages regarding ''Doctor Who'', done by fans, for fans, and all in good fun.


This new "{{Revival}} Series" is a direct continuation of the 1963-1989 "Classic Series", rather than being a ContinuityReboot, and the first Doctor depicted here, the Ninth Doctor, was a successor to the previous eight incarnations. The Revival Series has radically upgraded production values (the original series is notorious for its [[SpecialEffectFailure often rubbery monster prosthetics]] and bad ChromaKey), shorter [[StoryArc story arcs]] but much more continuity throughout, and deeper CharacterDevelopment and romance to the series than what first 24 seasons depicted[[note]]deeper character exploration began with Seasons 25&26, but the Revival Series is where this greater elaboration really started kicking in[[/note]]. As such, 2013 marked the show's 50th anniversary. The original show lasted 26 "seasons", whereas the new annual runs of episodes are called "series": officially, the show went from Season 26 to Series 1, and so on; despite this, it's important to note, once again, that the Revival Series is still very much a continuation of the Classic Series, though it doesn't rely on viewer familiarity of the show's continuity with its predecessor, allowing it to remain accessible to newcomers as well as to longtime fans. Even subtracting the 16-year "interregnum", the show still holds the record of longest-running English-language sci-fi series, with its nearest rival being the 12-season run of fellow UK series ''Series/RedDwarf''.

to:

This new "{{Revival}} Series" is a direct continuation of the 1963-1989 "Classic Series", rather than being a ContinuityReboot, and the first Doctor depicted here, the Ninth Doctor, was a successor to the previous eight incarnations. The Revival Series has radically upgraded production values (the original series is notorious for its [[SpecialEffectFailure often rubbery monster prosthetics]] and bad ChromaKey), shorter [[StoryArc story arcs]] but much more continuity throughout, and deeper CharacterDevelopment and romance to the series than what the first 24 seasons depicted[[note]]deeper character exploration began with Seasons 25&26, but the Revival Series is where this greater elaboration really started kicking in[[/note]]. As such, 2013 marked the show's 50th anniversary. The original show lasted 26 "seasons", whereas the new annual runs of episodes are called "series": officially, the show went from Season 26 to Series 1, and so on; despite this, it's important to note, once again, that the Revival Series is still very much a continuation of the Classic Series, though it doesn't rely on viewer familiarity of the show's continuity with its predecessor, allowing it to remain accessible to newcomers as well as to longtime fans. Even subtracting the 16-year "interregnum", the show still holds the record of longest-running English-language sci-fi series, with its nearest rival being the 12-season run of fellow UK series ''Series/RedDwarf''.


This new "{{Revival}} Series" is a direct continuation of the 1963-1989 "Classic Series", rather than being a ContinuityReboot, and the first Doctor depicted here, the Ninth Doctor, was a successor to the previous eight incarnations. The Revival Series has radically upgraded production values (the original series is notorious for its [[SpecialEffectFailure often rubbery monster prosthetics]] and bad ChromaKey), shorter [[StoryArc story arcs]] but much more continuity throughout, and deeper CharacterDevelopment and romance to the series than what the previous 26 seasons depicted[[note]]deeper exploration of character romances started with the Doctor and Grace's kiss near the end of the 1996 TV movie, but the Revival Series is where this greater elaboration really started kicking in[[/note]]. As such, 2013 marked the show's 50th anniversary. The original show lasted 26 "seasons", whereas the new annual runs of episodes are called "series": officially, the show went from Season 26 to Series 1, and so on; despite this, it's important to note, once again, that the Revival Series is still very much a continuation of the Classic Series, though it doesn't rely on viewer familiarity of the show's continuity with its predecessor, allowing it to remain accessible to newcomers as well as to longtime fans. Even subtracting the 16-year "interregnum", the show still holds the record of longest-running English-language sci-fi series, with its nearest rival being the 12-season run of fellow UK series ''Series/RedDwarf''.

to:

This new "{{Revival}} Series" is a direct continuation of the 1963-1989 "Classic Series", rather than being a ContinuityReboot, and the first Doctor depicted here, the Ninth Doctor, was a successor to the previous eight incarnations. The Revival Series has radically upgraded production values (the original series is notorious for its [[SpecialEffectFailure often rubbery monster prosthetics]] and bad ChromaKey), shorter [[StoryArc story arcs]] but much more continuity throughout, and deeper CharacterDevelopment and romance to the series than what the previous 26 first 24 seasons depicted[[note]]deeper character exploration of character romances started began with the Doctor and Grace's kiss near the end of the 1996 TV movie, Seasons 25&26, but the Revival Series is where this greater elaboration really started kicking in[[/note]]. As such, 2013 marked the show's 50th anniversary. The original show lasted 26 "seasons", whereas the new annual runs of episodes are called "series": officially, the show went from Season 26 to Series 1, and so on; despite this, it's important to note, once again, that the Revival Series is still very much a continuation of the Classic Series, though it doesn't rely on viewer familiarity of the show's continuity with its predecessor, allowing it to remain accessible to newcomers as well as to longtime fans. Even subtracting the 16-year "interregnum", the show still holds the record of longest-running English-language sci-fi series, with its nearest rival being the 12-season run of fellow UK series ''Series/RedDwarf''.


This new "{{Revival}} Series" is a direct continuation of the 1963-1989 "Classic Series", rather than being a ContinuityReboot, and the first Doctor depicted here was a successor to the previous eight incarnations. The Revival Series has radically upgraded production values (the original series is notorious for its [[SpecialEffectFailure often rubbery monster prosthetics]] and bad ChromaKey), shorter [[StoryArc story arcs]] but much more continuity throughout, and deeper CharacterDevelopment and romance to the series than what the previous 26 seasons depicted[[note]]deeper exploration of character romances started with the Doctor and Grace's kiss near the end of the 1996 TV movie, but the Revival Series is where this greater elaboration really started kicking in[[/note]]. As such, 2013 marked the show's 50th anniversary. The original show lasted 26 "seasons", whereas the new annual runs of episodes are called "series": officially, the show went from Season 26 to Series 1, and so on; despite this, it's important to note, once again, that the Revival Series is still very much a continuation of the Classic Series, though it doesn't rely on viewer familiarity of the show's continuity with its predecessor, allowing it to remain accessible to newcomers as well as to longtime fans. Even subtracting the 16-year "interregnum", the show still holds the record of longest-running English-language sci-fi series, with its nearest rival being the 12-season run of fellow UK series ''Series/RedDwarf''.

to:

This new "{{Revival}} Series" is a direct continuation of the 1963-1989 "Classic Series", rather than being a ContinuityReboot, and the first Doctor depicted here here, the Ninth Doctor, was a successor to the previous eight incarnations. The Revival Series has radically upgraded production values (the original series is notorious for its [[SpecialEffectFailure often rubbery monster prosthetics]] and bad ChromaKey), shorter [[StoryArc story arcs]] but much more continuity throughout, and deeper CharacterDevelopment and romance to the series than what the previous 26 seasons depicted[[note]]deeper exploration of character romances started with the Doctor and Grace's kiss near the end of the 1996 TV movie, but the Revival Series is where this greater elaboration really started kicking in[[/note]]. As such, 2013 marked the show's 50th anniversary. The original show lasted 26 "seasons", whereas the new annual runs of episodes are called "series": officially, the show went from Season 26 to Series 1, and so on; despite this, it's important to note, once again, that the Revival Series is still very much a continuation of the Classic Series, though it doesn't rely on viewer familiarity of the show's continuity with its predecessor, allowing it to remain accessible to newcomers as well as to longtime fans. Even subtracting the 16-year "interregnum", the show still holds the record of longest-running English-language sci-fi series, with its nearest rival being the 12-season run of fellow UK series ''Series/RedDwarf''.


The premise of the show is (somewhat) simple enough: it follows the adventures of a [[HumanAlien humanoid alien]] - the Doctor - and their various companions through time and space. The Doctor is a renegade of sorts, having left their home planet of Gallifrey, and travels around the universe in a [[SapientShip living and sentient]] {{time machine}}, the TARDIS (Time And Relative Dimensions In Space), and meets many foes, ranging from heavily armoured robots to killer microbes to members of the Doctor's own race, the Time Lords. Part of the longevity of the series is that when the actor playing the Doctor leaves, the show gets around this by killing the character off, only to [[TheNthDoctor "regenerate" the Doctor into a new form played by someone else]] (sometimes by someone significantly older or younger, or a different gender). As a result, the same character has appeared in the series from the beginning, but their new personality and new tastes give the show [[{{Retool}} a distinctly different atmosphere]] with each regeneration, leading the producers (and, often, fans) to treat the introduction of a new Doctor as a soft relaunch of the series. The show also frequently changes companions - over its history, only a relative handful have ever actually stayed longer than one or two seasons - and once again the change in companion is also treated as something of a relaunch, especially in the 2005-present era, where the stories are more frequently told from their perspective.

to:

The premise of the show is (somewhat) simple enough: it follows the adventures of a [[HumanAlien humanoid alien]] - -- the Doctor - -- and their various companions through time and space. The Doctor is a renegade of sorts, having left their home planet of Gallifrey, and travels around the universe in a [[SapientShip living and sentient]] {{time machine}}, the TARDIS (Time And Relative Dimensions In Space), and meets many foes, ranging from heavily armoured robots to killer microbes to members of the Doctor's own race, the Time Lords. Part of the longevity of the series is that when the actor playing the Doctor leaves, the show gets around this by killing the character off, only to [[TheNthDoctor "regenerate" the Doctor into a new form played by someone else]] (sometimes by someone significantly older or younger, or a different gender). As a result, the same character has appeared in the series from the beginning, but their new personality and new tastes give the show [[{{Retool}} a distinctly different atmosphere]] with each regeneration, leading the producers (and, often, fans) to treat the introduction of a new Doctor as a soft relaunch of the series. The show also frequently changes companions - over its history, only a relative handful have ever actually stayed longer than one or two seasons - -- and once again the change in companion is also treated as something of a relaunch, especially in the 2005-present era, where the stories are more frequently told from their perspective.


The premise of the show is simple enough: it follows the adventures of a [[HumanAlien humanoid alien]] - the Doctor - and their various companions through time and space. The Doctor is a renegade of sorts, having left their home planet of Galifrey, and travels around the universe in a [[SapientShip living and sentient]] {{time machine}}, the TARDIS (Time And Relative Dimensions In Space), and meets many foes, ranging from heavily armoured robots to killer microbes to members of the Doctor's own race, the Time Lords. Part of the longevity of the series is that when the actor playing the Doctor leaves, the show gets around this by killing the character off, only to [[TheNthDoctor "regenerate" the Doctor into a new form played by someone else]] (sometimes by someone significantly older or younger, or a different gender). As a result, the same character has appeared in the series from the beginning, but their new personality and new tastes give the show [[{{Retool}} a distinctly different atmosphere]] with each regeneration, leading the producers (and, often, fans) to treat the introduction of a new Doctor as a soft relaunch of the series. The show also frequently changes companions - over its history, only a relative handful have ever actually stayed longer than one or two seasons - and once again the change in companion is also treated as something of a relaunch, especially in the 2005-present era, where the stories are more frequently told from their perspective.

to:

The premise of the show is (somewhat) simple enough: it follows the adventures of a [[HumanAlien humanoid alien]] - the Doctor - and their various companions through time and space. The Doctor is a renegade of sorts, having left their home planet of Galifrey, Gallifrey, and travels around the universe in a [[SapientShip living and sentient]] {{time machine}}, the TARDIS (Time And Relative Dimensions In Space), and meets many foes, ranging from heavily armoured robots to killer microbes to members of the Doctor's own race, the Time Lords. Part of the longevity of the series is that when the actor playing the Doctor leaves, the show gets around this by killing the character off, only to [[TheNthDoctor "regenerate" the Doctor into a new form played by someone else]] (sometimes by someone significantly older or younger, or a different gender). As a result, the same character has appeared in the series from the beginning, but their new personality and new tastes give the show [[{{Retool}} a distinctly different atmosphere]] with each regeneration, leading the producers (and, often, fans) to treat the introduction of a new Doctor as a soft relaunch of the series. The show also frequently changes companions - over its history, only a relative handful have ever actually stayed longer than one or two seasons - and once again the change in companion is also treated as something of a relaunch, especially in the 2005-present era, where the stories are more frequently told from their perspective.


[[caption-width-right:350:''"Next stop... everywhere."'' [[note]] Pictured: The [[TheNthDoctor Thirteenth]] [[HumanAliens Doctor]] and her [[SapientShip TAR]][[BiggerOnTheInside DIS]].]] Not pictured: [[LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters over twelve other Doctors, the various companions, enemies, allies...]] [[/note]]

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[[caption-width-right:350:''"Next stop... everywhere."'' [[note]] Pictured: The [[TheNthDoctor Thirteenth]] [[HumanAliens Doctor]] and her [[SapientShip TAR]][[BiggerOnTheInside DIS]].]] Not pictured: [[LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters over twelve other Doctors, the various companions, enemies, allies...]] [[/note]]]]]][[/note]]


[[caption-width-right:350:''"Next stop... everywhere."'' [[note]] Pictured: The [[TheNthDoctor Thirteenth]] [[HumanAliens Doctor]] and her [[SapientShip TAR]][[BiggerOnTheInside DIS]].]][[/note]]

to:

[[caption-width-right:350:''"Next stop... everywhere."'' [[note]] Pictured: The [[TheNthDoctor Thirteenth]] [[HumanAliens Doctor]] and her [[SapientShip TAR]][[BiggerOnTheInside DIS]].]][[/note]]]] Not pictured: [[LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters over twelve other Doctors, the various companions, enemies, allies...]] [[/note]]


''Doctor Who'' is a British television institution, and the longest-running science-fiction series in the world, first airing on [[Creator/TheBBC BBC TV]] on 23 November 1963. Created by Canadian television producer Creator/SydneyNewman, it takes place in and established the Franchise/{{Whoniverse}}, which has a continuous and [[BroadStrokes constantly adapting]] story involving many different timelines. It also spawned the truly vast Franchise/DoctorWhoExpandedUniverse.

The premise of the show is simple enough: it follows the adventures of a renegade Time Lord-- the Doctor-- and their various companions through time and space. The Doctor travels in a [[SapientShip living and sentient]] {{time machine}}, the TARDIS (Time And Relative Dimension In Space), and meets many foes, ranging from heavily armoured robots to killer microbes and pollen to-- well, members of their own race. Part of the longevity of the series is that when the actor playing the Doctor leaves, the show gets around this by killing the character off, only to [[TheNthDoctor "regenerate" the Doctor into a new form played by someone else]] (sometimes by someone significantly older or younger, or a different gender). As a result, the same character has appeared in the series from the beginning, but their new personality and new tastes give the show [[{{Retool}} a distinctly different atmosphere]] with each regeneration, leading the producers (and, often, fans) to treat the introduction of a new Doctor as a soft relaunch of the series. The show also frequently changes companions-- over its history, only a relative handful have ever actually stayed longer than one or two seasons-- and once again the change in companion is also treated as something of a relaunch, especially in the 2005-present era, where the stories are more frequently told from their perspective.

to:

''Doctor Who'' is a British television institution, and [[LongRunners the longest-running science-fiction series in the world, world]], first airing on [[Creator/TheBBC BBC TV]] on 23 November 1963. Created by Canadian television producer Creator/SydneyNewman, it takes place in and established the Franchise/{{Whoniverse}}, which has a continuous and [[BroadStrokes constantly adapting]] story involving many different timelines. It timelines, and also spawned the truly vast Franchise/DoctorWhoExpandedUniverse.

The premise of the show is simple enough: it follows the adventures of a renegade Time Lord-- [[HumanAlien humanoid alien]] - the Doctor-- Doctor - and their various companions through time and space. The Doctor is a renegade of sorts, having left their home planet of Galifrey, and travels around the universe in a [[SapientShip living and sentient]] {{time machine}}, the TARDIS (Time And Relative Dimension Dimensions In Space), and meets many foes, ranging from heavily armoured robots to killer microbes and pollen to-- well, to members of their the Doctor's own race.race, the Time Lords. Part of the longevity of the series is that when the actor playing the Doctor leaves, the show gets around this by killing the character off, only to [[TheNthDoctor "regenerate" the Doctor into a new form played by someone else]] (sometimes by someone significantly older or younger, or a different gender). As a result, the same character has appeared in the series from the beginning, but their new personality and new tastes give the show [[{{Retool}} a distinctly different atmosphere]] with each regeneration, leading the producers (and, often, fans) to treat the introduction of a new Doctor as a soft relaunch of the series. The show also frequently changes companions-- companions - over its history, only a relative handful have ever actually stayed longer than one or two seasons-- seasons - and once again the change in companion is also treated as something of a relaunch, especially in the 2005-present era, where the stories are more frequently told from their perspective.



A MadeForTVMovie aired in 1996, in which the Seventh Doctor returned at the end of his life and regenerated into the Eighth. This was created [[BackDoorPilot as a pilot]] for an American-led revival, but although the Eighth Doctor became part of the continuity as a whole, no actual return of the series resulted due to the film's poor ratings in the United States (it was, however, a success in the UK). Throughout the remainder of the decade, Creator/TheBBC made attempts to relaunch the series as a theatrical film, to no avail, and between 2001 and 2003 produced a series of webcasts which it considered in every way an official continuation of the series (insofar as the Beeb ever indicates what is and isn't canon). It is possible more would have been made but for a very exciting development on the television front: in 2005, the BBC [[ObligatoryJoke regenerated]] the show.

This new "{{Revival}} Series" is a direct continuation of the 1963-1989 "Classic Series", rather than being a ContinuityReboot, and the first Doctor depicted here was a successor to the previous eight incarnations. The Revival Series has radically upgraded production values (the original series is notorious for its [[SpecialEffectFailure often rubbery monster prosthetics]] and bad ChromaKey), shorter [[StoryArc story arcs]] but much more continuity throughout, and deeper CharacterDevelopment and romance to the series than what the previous 26 seasons depicted[[note]]deeper exploration of character romances started with the Doctor and Grace's kiss near the end of the 1996 TV movie, but the Revival Series is where this greater elaboration really started kicking in[[/note]]. As such, 2013 marked the show's 50th anniversary. The original show lasted 26 "seasons", whereas the new annual runs of episodes are called "series": officially, the show went from Season 26 to Series 1, and so on; despite this, it's important to note, once again, that the Revival Series is still very much a continuation of the Classic Series, though it doesn't rely on viewer familiarity of the show's continuity with its predecessor, allowing it to remain accessible to newcomers as well as to longtime fans. Even subtracting the 16-year "interregnum", the show still holds the record of longest-running English-language sci-fi series, with its nearest rival being the 12-season run of the UK series ''Series/RedDwarf''.

''Doctor Who'' is a British institution and considered a key part of British culture: even [[UsefulNotes/HMTheQueen Her Britannic Majesty]] is a fan, and threw the show a ''birthday party'' in her ''palace'' for its 50th anniversary in 2013. It is also notable that Michael Grade, the BBC Controller when the show originally went off the air in 1989 and a vocal critic of the classic series (thus leading him to be the one most commonly blamed for cancelling ''Doctor Who''), is the only BBC Controller ''not'' to have received a knighthood-- [[SarcasmMode entirely coincidentally, we're sure.]][[note]]Normally, we Brits and the Queen are ''above'' pettiness. In this case... well...[[/note]] In addition, the Royal Mail honoured the show's anniversary with a set of stamps one for each Doctor (and the TARDIS) plus the show's villains.

to:

A MadeForTVMovie aired in 1996, in which the Seventh Doctor returned at the end of his life and regenerated into the Eighth. This was created [[BackDoorPilot as a pilot]] for an American-led revival, but although the Eighth Doctor became part of the continuity as a whole, no actual return of the series resulted due to the film's poor ratings in the United States (it was, however, a success in the UK). Throughout the remainder of the decade, Creator/TheBBC made attempts to relaunch the series as a theatrical film, to no avail, and between 2001 and 2003 produced a series of webcasts which it considered in every way an official continuation of the series (insofar as the Beeb ever indicates what is and isn't canon). It is possible more would have been made made, but for a very exciting development on the television front: front was made in 2005, as the BBC [[ObligatoryJoke regenerated]] the show.

This new "{{Revival}} Series" is a direct continuation of the 1963-1989 "Classic Series", rather than being a ContinuityReboot, and the first Doctor depicted here was a successor to the previous eight incarnations. The Revival Series has radically upgraded production values (the original series is notorious for its [[SpecialEffectFailure often rubbery monster prosthetics]] and bad ChromaKey), shorter [[StoryArc story arcs]] but much more continuity throughout, and deeper CharacterDevelopment and romance to the series than what the previous 26 seasons depicted[[note]]deeper exploration of character romances started with the Doctor and Grace's kiss near the end of the 1996 TV movie, but the Revival Series is where this greater elaboration really started kicking in[[/note]]. As such, 2013 marked the show's 50th anniversary. The original show lasted 26 "seasons", whereas the new annual runs of episodes are called "series": officially, the show went from Season 26 to Series 1, and so on; despite this, it's important to note, once again, that the Revival Series is still very much a continuation of the Classic Series, though it doesn't rely on viewer familiarity of the show's continuity with its predecessor, allowing it to remain accessible to newcomers as well as to longtime fans. Even subtracting the 16-year "interregnum", the show still holds the record of longest-running English-language sci-fi series, with its nearest rival being the 12-season run of the fellow UK series ''Series/RedDwarf''.

''Doctor Who'' is a British institution and considered a key part of British culture: even [[UsefulNotes/HMTheQueen Her Britannic Majesty]] The Queen]] herself is a fan, and threw the show a ''birthday party'' in her ''palace'' for its 50th anniversary in 2013. It is also notable that Michael Grade, the BBC Controller when the show originally went off the air in 1989 and a vocal critic of the classic series (thus leading him to be the one most commonly blamed for cancelling ''Doctor Who''), is the only BBC Controller ''not'' to have received a knighthood-- [[SarcasmMode entirely coincidentally, we're sure.]][[note]]Normally, we Brits and the Queen are ''above'' pettiness. In this case... well...[[/note]] In addition, the Royal Mail honoured the show's anniversary with a set of stamps one for each Doctor (and the TARDIS) plus the show's villains.



* ''Search Out Space'' (1990), a one-off special edition of Search Out Science, a children's education programme.
::With Creator/SylvesterMcCoy and Sophie Aldred retuning as the 7th doctor and Ace, and joined by K9.

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* ''Search Out Space'' (1990), a one-off special edition of Search ''Search Out Science, Science'', a children's education programme.
::With
programme, with Creator/SylvesterMcCoy and Sophie Aldred retuning returning as the 7th doctor Doctor and Ace, and joined by K9.



There is also a frequently updated MatchThreeGame full of ContinuityPorn known as ''[[VideoGame/DoctorWhoLegacy Doctor Who: Legacy]]''.



!!I am the Doctor and you are the tropers:

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!!I am the Doctor Doctor, and you are the tropers:


''Doctor Who'' is a British television institution, and the longest-running science-fiction series in the world, first airing on [[Creator/TheBBC BBC TV]] on 23 November 1963. It takes place in and established the Franchise/{{Whoniverse}}, which has a continuous and [[BroadStrokes constantly adapting]] story involving many different timelines. It also spawned the truly vast Franchise/DoctorWhoExpandedUniverse.

The premise of the show is simple enough: it follows the adventures of a renegade Time Lord--the Doctor--and their various companions through time and space. The Doctor travels in a [[SapientShip living and sentient]] {{time machine}}, the TARDIS (Time And Relative Dimension In Space), and meets many foes, ranging from heavily armoured robots to killer microbes and pollen to -- well, members of their own race. Part of the longevity of the series is that when the actor playing the Doctor leaves, the show gets around this by killing the character off, only to [[TheNthDoctor "regenerate" the Doctor into a new form played by someone else]] (sometimes by someone significantly older or younger, or a different gender). As a result, the same character has appeared in the series from the beginning but their new personality and new tastes give the show a distinctly different atmosphere with each regeneration, and the producers (and, often, fans) treat the introduction of a new Doctor as a relaunch of the series. The show also frequently changes companions (over its history only a relative handful have ever actually stayed longer than one or two seasons), and once again the change in companion is also treated as something of a relaunch, especially in the 2005-present era where the stories are more frequently told from their perspective.

to:

''Doctor Who'' is a British television institution, and the longest-running science-fiction series in the world, first airing on [[Creator/TheBBC BBC TV]] on 23 November 1963. It Created by Canadian television producer Creator/SydneyNewman, it takes place in and established the Franchise/{{Whoniverse}}, which has a continuous and [[BroadStrokes constantly adapting]] story involving many different timelines. It also spawned the truly vast Franchise/DoctorWhoExpandedUniverse.

The premise of the show is simple enough: it follows the adventures of a renegade Time Lord--the Doctor--and Lord-- the Doctor-- and their various companions through time and space. The Doctor travels in a [[SapientShip living and sentient]] {{time machine}}, the TARDIS (Time And Relative Dimension In Space), and meets many foes, ranging from heavily armoured robots to killer microbes and pollen to -- to-- well, members of their own race. Part of the longevity of the series is that when the actor playing the Doctor leaves, the show gets around this by killing the character off, only to [[TheNthDoctor "regenerate" the Doctor into a new form played by someone else]] (sometimes by someone significantly older or younger, or a different gender). As a result, the same character has appeared in the series from the beginning beginning, but their new personality and new tastes give the show [[{{Retool}} a distinctly different atmosphere atmosphere]] with each regeneration, and leading the producers (and, often, fans) to treat the introduction of a new Doctor as a soft relaunch of the series. The show also frequently changes companions (over companions-- over its history history, only a relative handful have ever actually stayed longer than one or two seasons), seasons-- and once again the change in companion is also treated as something of a relaunch, especially in the 2005-present era era, where the stories are more frequently told from their perspective.



This new "{{Revival}} Series" is a direct continuation of the 1963-1989 "Classic Series", rather than being a ContinuityReboot, and the first Doctor depicted here was a successor to the previous eight incarnations. The Revival Series has radically upgraded production values (the original series is notorious for its [[SpecialEffectFailure often rubbery monster prosthetics]] and bad ChromaKey), shorter [[StoryArc story arcs]] but much more continuity throughout, and deeper CharacterDevelopment and romance to the series than what the previous 26 seasons depicted[[note]]deeper exploration of character romances started with the Doctor and Grace's kiss near the end of the 1996 TV movie, but the Revival Series is where this greater elaboration really started kicking in[[/note]]. As such, 2013 marked the show's 50th anniversary. The original show lasted 26 "seasons", whereas the new annual runs of episodes are called "series": officially, the show went from Season 26 to Series 1, and so on; despite this, it's important to note, once again, that the Revival Series is still very much a continuation of the Classic Series. Even subtracting the 16-year "interregnum", the show still holds the record of longest-running English-language sci-fi series, with its nearest rival being the 12-season run of the UK series ''Series/RedDwarf''.

to:

This new "{{Revival}} Series" is a direct continuation of the 1963-1989 "Classic Series", rather than being a ContinuityReboot, and the first Doctor depicted here was a successor to the previous eight incarnations. The Revival Series has radically upgraded production values (the original series is notorious for its [[SpecialEffectFailure often rubbery monster prosthetics]] and bad ChromaKey), shorter [[StoryArc story arcs]] but much more continuity throughout, and deeper CharacterDevelopment and romance to the series than what the previous 26 seasons depicted[[note]]deeper exploration of character romances started with the Doctor and Grace's kiss near the end of the 1996 TV movie, but the Revival Series is where this greater elaboration really started kicking in[[/note]]. As such, 2013 marked the show's 50th anniversary. The original show lasted 26 "seasons", whereas the new annual runs of episodes are called "series": officially, the show went from Season 26 to Series 1, and so on; despite this, it's important to note, once again, that the Revival Series is still very much a continuation of the Classic Series.Series, though it doesn't rely on viewer familiarity of the show's continuity with its predecessor, allowing it to remain accessible to newcomers as well as to longtime fans. Even subtracting the 16-year "interregnum", the show still holds the record of longest-running English-language sci-fi series, with its nearest rival being the 12-season run of the UK series ''Series/RedDwarf''.


[[caption-width-right:350:''"Next stop... everywhere."'' [[note]] Pictured: [[TheNthDoctor The]] [[HumanAliens Doctor]] and her [[SapientShip TAR]][[BiggerOnTheInside DIS]].]][[/note]]

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[[caption-width-right:350:''"Next stop... everywhere."'' [[note]] Pictured: The [[TheNthDoctor The]] Thirteenth]] [[HumanAliens Doctor]] and her [[SapientShip TAR]][[BiggerOnTheInside DIS]].]][[/note]]


[[caption-width-right:350:''"Next stop... everywhere."'' [[note]] Pictured: [[TheNthDoctor The]] [[HumanAliens Doctor]] and her [[SapientShip TAR]][[BiggerOnTheInside DIS]].]]

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[[caption-width-right:350:''"Next stop... everywhere."'' [[note]] Pictured: [[TheNthDoctor The]] [[HumanAliens Doctor]] and her [[SapientShip TAR]][[BiggerOnTheInside DIS]].]]]][[/note]]


[[caption-width-right:350:''"Next stop everywhere"'' [[note]] Pictured: [[TheNthDoctor The]] [[HumanAliens Doctor]] and her [[SapientShip TAR]][[BiggerOnTheInside DIS]].]]

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[[caption-width-right:350:''"Next stop everywhere"'' stop... everywhere."'' [[note]] Pictured: [[TheNthDoctor The]] [[HumanAliens Doctor]] and her [[SapientShip TAR]][[BiggerOnTheInside DIS]].]]

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