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** The 27th Amendment patched a rule that was so obvious, the Amendment to fix it was submitted in the late 1700s. Basically, Congress can vote itself a pay raise, but the raise will not take place until after the next general election. On the other hand, this rule has itself had unintended consequences, namely that because it applies to ''all'' laws that change Congress's pay, including laws that ''lower'' it. So Congress can't immediately stop itself from being paid during a government shutdown, or give itself extra motivation to reach some goal by cutting its own pay if a bill doesn't pass.

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** The 27th Amendment patched a rule that was so obvious, the Amendment to fix it was submitted in the late 1700s. Basically, Congress can vote itself a pay raise, but the raise will not take place until after the next general election. On the other hand, this rule has itself had unintended consequences, namely that because it applies to ''all'' laws that change Congress's pay, including laws that ''lower'' it. So Congress can't immediately stop itself from being paid during a government shutdown, or give itself extra motivation to reach some goal by cutting its own pay if a bill doesn't pass.


**On the contrary, Baker v. Nelson ''did'' set precedent which was cited by the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals in upholding state-level same-sex marriage bans.



* The British "Constitution" (see UsefulNotes/BritishPoliticalSystem) has one obvious rule patch when Edward VIII decided to AbdicateTheThrone in 1936. The Act of Settlement 1701, which regulates royal succession in the UK, pretty much stated the most senior descendent of a granddaughter of [[UsefulNotes/TheHouseOfTudor James VI/I]] would automatically be the monarch, but ''nothing'' was said about abdications. So when Edward signed his [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Edward_abdication.png Instrument of Abdication]][[note]]In LaymansTerms: "I and my descendents will not be monarchs."[[/note]] on 10 December 1936, it meant nothing--the law said, "ButThouMust still be the King." Parliament was quite eager to see him go, though, and had to pass [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/His_Majesty%27s_Declaration_of_Abdication_Act_1936 a law]] to make this work. The law said three things: (1) At the time His Majesty signs this piece of paper, in terms of royal succession he is [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demise_of_the_Crown as good as dead]]; (2) No matter what any other law says, His Majesty and his descendents cannot become monarch[[note]] Of course, as he and his wife had no children, this became a moot point at his death in 1972.[[/note]]; and (3) We're not going to stand in the way of his marriage to Mrs. Simpson any more.

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* The British "Constitution" (see UsefulNotes/BritishPoliticalSystem) has one obvious rule patch when Edward VIII decided to AbdicateTheThrone in 1936. The Act of Settlement 1701, which regulates royal succession in the UK, pretty much stated the most senior descendent of a granddaughter of [[UsefulNotes/TheHouseOfTudor James VI/I]] would automatically be the monarch, but ''nothing'' was said about abdications. So when Edward signed his [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Edward_abdication.png Instrument of Abdication]][[note]]In LaymansTerms: "I and my descendents descendants will not be monarchs."[[/note]] on 10 December 1936, it meant nothing--the law said, "ButThouMust still be the King." Parliament was quite eager to see him go, though, and had to pass [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/His_Majesty%27s_Declaration_of_Abdication_Act_1936 a law]] to make this work. The law said three things: (1) At the time His Majesty signs this piece of paper, in terms of royal succession he is [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demise_of_the_Crown as good as dead]]; (2) No matter what any other law says, His Majesty and his descendents cannot become monarch[[note]] Of course, as he and his wife had no children, this became a moot point at his death in 1972.[[/note]]; and (3) We're not going to stand in the way of his marriage to Mrs. Simpson any more.



* The city of Hialeah, Florida outlawed animal sacrifices in order to prevent practicers of Santería (a Caribbean religion that, among other things, uses animal sacrifices in some of its ceremonies) from opening a church. This one was ''so'' blatant [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Church_of_the_Lukumi_Babalu_Aye_v._City_of_Hialeah that the law was declared unconstitutional by the Supreme Courts on the grounds that it was religious discrimination.]]

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* The city of Hialeah, Florida outlawed animal sacrifices in order to prevent practicers practitioners of Santería (a Caribbean religion that, among other things, uses animal sacrifices in some of its ceremonies) from opening a church. This one was ''so'' blatant [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Church_of_the_Lukumi_Babalu_Aye_v._City_of_Hialeah that the law was declared unconstitutional by the Supreme Courts Court on the grounds that it was religious discrimination.]]]]
* Enough enterprising law school graduates filed for bankruptcy to discharge their student loans that Congress changed bankruptcy laws to make student loan debt non-dischargable.


** The 15th Amendment: Attempted to prevent Southern states from blocking voting rights to former slaves. [[{{Subverted}} Unfortunately it didn't work]].

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** The 15th Amendment: Attempted to prevent Southern states from blocking voting rights to former slaves. [[{{Subverted}} Unfortunately it didn't work]].work, in large part because said states were masters of MyRuleFuIsStrongerThanYours. This has also resulted in many states of the former Confederacy having their own [[ObviousRulePatch Obvious Rule Patches]], in order to maintain their existing social structures without running afoul of the Federal Courts.

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* Insurance companies specifically require that bank vaults have alarm systems before insuring them against theft, in response to [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albert_Spaggiari a bank heist that worked specifically because the bank and the insurance company had thought there was no need to put an alarm on a supposedly invulnerable bank vault]].


** The 15th Amendment: Attempted to prevent Southern states from blocking voting rights to former slaves. [[Subverted Unfortunately it didn't work]].

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** The 15th Amendment: Attempted to prevent Southern states from blocking voting rights to former slaves. [[Subverted [[{{Subverted}} Unfortunately it didn't work]].

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** The 14th Amendment was several obvious rule patches baked into one amendment: In the infamous Dread Scott Supreme Court decision, where the Supreme Court effectively ruled that African Americans could never be citizens. The 14th amendment redefined citizenship so African Americans were citizens. It also quashed the ability for former Confederate government personnel from being elected to Congress, and stated the US never had to pay a dime of the debt incurred by the Confederacy.
**The 15th Amendment: Attempted to prevent Southern states from blocking voting rights to former slaves. [[Subverted Unfortunately it didn't work]].


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** The 24th amendment: Another attempt to stop people from being denied the right to vote, making it illegal to require people to pay a tax before they could vote.


* A very significant and serious example is gun laws in the United Kingdom. The most significant pieces of firearms legislation in the last thirty years have been introduced as a piecemeal response to rampage killings - for instance, the banning of semi-automatic long-barreled firearms in a calibre greater than .22 rimfire (not shotguns) following the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hungerford_massacre Hungerford massacre]], and the criminalizing of nearly all handguns following the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dunblane_school_massacre Dunblane school massacre]]. Whether these were proportionate responses [[ValuesDissonance seems to depend on what side of the Atlantic you live on]]. Suffice it to say that each measure had cross-party and public support at the time of its enactment.

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* A very significant and serious example is gun laws in the United Kingdom. The most significant pieces of firearms legislation in the last thirty years have been introduced as a piecemeal response to rampage killings - for instance, the banning of semi-automatic long-barreled firearms in a calibre greater than .22 rimfire (not shotguns) rimfire, and shot-guns with a capacity of more than three shells, following the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hungerford_massacre Hungerford massacre]], and the criminalizing of nearly all handguns following the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dunblane_school_massacre Dunblane school massacre]]. Whether these were proportionate responses [[ValuesDissonance seems to depend on what side of the Atlantic you live on]]. Suffice it to say that each measure had cross-party and public support at the time of its enactment.


* ''Series/RobotWars'' had a number of weapons on their combat robots that were not allowed, but tinfoil was not one of them. American competitor Tentoumushi used this to great effect: In the form of a large plastic shell lined with tinfoil on the inside, it would cover the opposing bots, jamming their signals from their operators and effectively shutting them down. As said combat is done over a pit on all sides, Tentoumushi would then shove the opposing bot into the pit to win by RingOut, or, if a Ring Out was not possible, then via incapacitation as the opposing bot cannot move.
* Its American counterpart, ''Series/BattleBots'', had one bot during its Comedy Central run, Spare Parts, coated in [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ablative_armor ablative armor]], a type of protection that works by having fragments chip off any time it's hit. In this case, some of the armor would disintegrate into a fine powder. It caused such a mess in the arena, with cleanup taking so long, that ablative armor was banned from then on, despite it being extremely rare outside of space travel and science fiction.

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* ''Series/RobotWars'' had a number of weapons on their combat robots that were not allowed, but tinfoil was not one of them. American competitor Tentoumushi used this to great effect: In the form of a large plastic shell lined with tinfoil on the inside, it would cover the opposing bots, jamming their signals from their operators and effectively shutting them down. As said combat is done over a pit on all sides, sides (albeit with a short fence) and one in the middle, Tentoumushi would then shove the opposing bot into the pit to win by RingOut, or, if a Ring Out was not possible, then via incapacitation as the opposing bot cannot move.
* Its American counterpart, ''Series/BattleBots'', had one at least two such incidents:
** A
bot during its Comedy Central run, Spare Parts, was coated in [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ablative_armor ablative armor]], a type of protection that works by having fragments chip off any time it's hit. In this case, some of the armor would disintegrate into a fine powder. It caused such a mess in the arena, with cleanup taking so long, that ablative armor was banned from then on, despite it being extremely rare outside of space travel and science fiction.fiction.
** Initially, any robot with a means of locomotion other than wheels was deemed a "walker" and was allowed to go over a weight class's weight limit by a particular amount to compensate for its speed and balance disadvantages. Even with this bonus, walkers struggled a great deal, rarely making it past the first round. In came [[http://battlebots.wikia.com/wiki/Son_of_Whyachi Son of Whyachi]] in Comedy Central's Season 3.0, a robot with a rapidly spinning canopy lined with hammers. Son of Whyachi walked, but took very small but rapid steps, allowing it to scoot along the floor much faster than other walkers, and because the steps were so small, always remained perfectly balanced. Son of Whyachi proceeded to rip apart all of its competitors, thanks to the weight bonus, and defeated TheDreaded Biohazard to become the heavyweight champion. Once the competition was over, both ''[=BattleBots=]'' and ''Robot Wars'' revised their rules, deeming robots with Son of Whyachi's means of locomotion as "shufflebots" and designated them as wheeled robots, thus prohibiting Son of Whyachi and any would-be imitators from the weight bonus from then on. Son of Whyachi entered the following year, unchanged, in the next weight class up. It didn't do nearly as well, and Son of Whyachi would be rebuilt as a fully-wheeled bot after that.


** Several other changes were made starting with the January 13, 2001 chart. After a ton of album cuts swamped the bottom of the charts in 2000 (most notably, "Let's Make Love" by Music/TimMcGraw and Music/FaithHill racked up so many weeks as an album cut that it actually passed the 20-week threshhold and fell off before re-entering upon its official single release), the number of positions shrank from 75 to 60 and as a result, songs had their tally of total weeks on the chart refactored to count only weeks spent at #60 or higher (a rule that particularly benefited Gary Allan's "Right Where I Need to Be", as knocking its total number of weeks from 23 to 16 allowed it to keep climbing and eventually reach Top 5). Also, due to a vast number of Christmas songs flooding the charts at the turn of every year (nearly ''everything'' below #30 on the first chart of 2000 was a Christmas song), the rules were changed around the same time so that Christmas songs could only chart once, ever.

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** Several other changes were made starting with the January 13, 2001 chart. After a ton of album cuts swamped the bottom of the charts in 2000 (most notably, "Let's Make Love" by Music/TimMcGraw and Music/FaithHill racked up so many weeks as an album cut that it actually passed the 20-week threshhold and fell off before re-entering upon its official single release), the number of positions shrank from 75 to 60 and as a result, songs had their tally of total weeks on the chart refactored to count only weeks spent at #60 or higher (a rule that particularly benefited Gary Allan's Music/GaryAllan's "Right Where I Need to Be", as knocking its total number of weeks from 23 to 16 allowed it to keep climbing and eventually reach Top 5). Also, due to a vast number of Christmas songs flooding the charts at the turn of every year (nearly ''everything'' below #30 on the first chart of 2000 was a Christmas song), the rules were changed around the same time so that Christmas songs could only chart once, ever.

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** Thermodynamics has a First, Second, and Third law...and later they added a Zeroth Law.


** It is illegal to enter Wisconsin, from the Minnesota border, while wearing a duck on your head. Begin {{Wild Mass Guess}}ing...[[note]]This law is probably unconstitutional, on the grounds that it violates the fundamental right of any person legally within the United States to travel anywhere within the United States while wearing a duck on their head (OK, the constitution doesn't ''specifically'' mention the duck). It may also implicate the "Dormant Commerce Clause": Absent express Congressional authorization or a compelling public-policy reason, states are forbidden from discriminating against commerce from other states, and people moving across state lines--with or without ducks on their heads--is usually considered "commerce" for constitutional purposes. Also, it likely violates the 1st amendment and symbolic speech precedent's introduced in Tinker v. Des Moines and Texas v. Johnson. [[/note]]

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** It is illegal to enter Wisconsin, from the Minnesota border, while wearing a duck on your head. Begin {{Wild Mass Guess}}ing...[[note]]This law is probably unconstitutional, on the grounds that it violates the fundamental right of any person legally within the United States to travel anywhere within the United States while wearing a duck on their head (OK, the constitution doesn't ''specifically'' mention the duck).duck, but as there appears to be no principled reason why such a law would exist, it's not going to survive scrutiny). It may also implicate the "Dormant Commerce Clause": Absent express Congressional authorization or a compelling public-policy reason, states are forbidden from discriminating against commerce from other states, and people moving across state lines--with or without ducks on their heads--is usually considered "commerce" for constitutional purposes. It is also likely unconstitutional under Dormant Commerce Clause as discriminating against commerce from a particular different state; it appears that someone could cross the border from Iowa, Illinois, or Michigan to walk into Wisconsin with a duck on their heads with no issues, so why is Minnesota getting singled out? Also, it likely violates the 1st amendment and symbolic speech precedent's introduced in Tinker v. Des Moines and Texas v. Johnson. [[/note]]


* The city of Hialeah, Florida outlawed animal sacrifices in order to prevent practicers of Santería (a Caribbean religion that, among other things, uses animal sacrifices in some of its ceremonies) from opening a church. This one was ''so'' blatant [[https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Church_of_the_Lukumi_Babalu_Aye_v._City_of_Hialeah that the law was declared unconstitutional by the Supreme Courts on the grounds that it was religious discrimination.]]

to:

* The city of Hialeah, Florida outlawed animal sacrifices in order to prevent practicers of Santería (a Caribbean religion that, among other things, uses animal sacrifices in some of its ceremonies) from opening a church. This one was ''so'' blatant [[https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Church_of_the_Lukumi_Babalu_Aye_v._City_of_Hialeah that the law was declared unconstitutional by the Supreme Courts on the grounds that it was religious discrimination.]]


* Its American counterpart, ''Series/BattleBots'', had one bot during its Comedy Central run coated in [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ablative_armor ablative armor]], a type of protection that works by having fragments chip off any time it's hit. In this case, some of the armor would disintegrate into a fine powder. It caused such a mess in the arena, with cleanup taking so long, that ablative armor was banned from then on, despite it being extremely rare outside of space travel and science fiction.

to:

* Its American counterpart, ''Series/BattleBots'', had one bot during its Comedy Central run run, Spare Parts, coated in [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ablative_armor ablative armor]], a type of protection that works by having fragments chip off any time it's hit. In this case, some of the armor would disintegrate into a fine powder. It caused such a mess in the arena, with cleanup taking so long, that ablative armor was banned from then on, despite it being extremely rare outside of space travel and science fiction.


* ''Series/RobotWars'' had a number of weapons on their combat robots that were not allowed, but tinfoil was not one of them. American competitor Tentoumushi used this to great effect: In the form of a large plastic shell lined with tinfoil on the inside, it would cover the opposing bots, jamming their signals from their operators and effectively shutting them down. As said combat is done over a pit on all sides, Tentoumushi would then shove the opposing bot into the pit to win by RingOut.
* Its American counterpart, ''Series/BattleBots'', had one bot during its Comedy Central run coated in [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ablative_armor ablative armor]], a type of protection that works by having fragments chip off any time it's hit. In this case, some of the armor would disintegrate into a fine powder. It caused such a mess in the arena, with cleanup taking so long, that ablative armor was banned from then on, despite it being extremely rare outside of space travel.

to:

* ''Series/RobotWars'' had a number of weapons on their combat robots that were not allowed, but tinfoil was not one of them. American competitor Tentoumushi used this to great effect: In the form of a large plastic shell lined with tinfoil on the inside, it would cover the opposing bots, jamming their signals from their operators and effectively shutting them down. As said combat is done over a pit on all sides, Tentoumushi would then shove the opposing bot into the pit to win by RingOut.
RingOut, or, if a Ring Out was not possible, then via incapacitation as the opposing bot cannot move.
* Its American counterpart, ''Series/BattleBots'', had one bot during its Comedy Central run coated in [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ablative_armor ablative armor]], a type of protection that works by having fragments chip off any time it's hit. In this case, some of the armor would disintegrate into a fine powder. It caused such a mess in the arena, with cleanup taking so long, that ablative armor was banned from then on, despite it being extremely rare outside of space travel.travel and science fiction.

Added DiffLines:

* ''Series/RobotWars'' had a number of weapons on their combat robots that were not allowed, but tinfoil was not one of them. American competitor Tentoumushi used this to great effect: In the form of a large plastic shell lined with tinfoil on the inside, it would cover the opposing bots, jamming their signals from their operators and effectively shutting them down. As said combat is done over a pit on all sides, Tentoumushi would then shove the opposing bot into the pit to win by RingOut.
* Its American counterpart, ''Series/BattleBots'', had one bot during its Comedy Central run coated in [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ablative_armor ablative armor]], a type of protection that works by having fragments chip off any time it's hit. In this case, some of the armor would disintegrate into a fine powder. It caused such a mess in the arena, with cleanup taking so long, that ablative armor was banned from then on, despite it being extremely rare outside of space travel.

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