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* UsefulNotes/BritishAccents: Considering that he was Romano-British, Arthur predated the English language being spoken by the majority in Britain and he fought to keep this from happening. But of course most modern adaptations are in English, and so they give him a [[IAmVeryBritish standard Received Pronunciation accent]] to fit with his royal background.



* UsefulNotes/{{Wales}}: Possibly. Arthur might have been a Romano-British warlord of Welsh descent.
* UsefulNotes/TheWestCountry: Alternatively, he may have been born in Cornwall, which is firmly located in the region. Arthur's mother Igraine was the wife of Gorlois and his rival Uther Pendragon would [[BedTrick secretly bed her]] at Tintagel which led to his birth.


* UsefulNotes/BritishAccents: Considering that he was Romano-British, Arthur would have likely spoken the Anglicized version of Latin. Most modern adaptations simply give him a [[IAmVeryBritish standard Received Pronunciation accent]] to fit with his royal background.

to:

* UsefulNotes/BritishAccents: Considering that he was Romano-British, Arthur would have likely predated the English language being spoken by the Anglicized version majority in Britain and he fought to keep this from happening. But of Latin. Most course most modern adaptations simply are in English, and so they give him a [[IAmVeryBritish standard Received Pronunciation accent]] to fit with his royal background.


* UsefulNotes/BritishAccents: Considering that he was Romano-British, Arthur would have likely spoken the Anglicized version of Latin. Most modern adaptations simply give him a standard Received Pronunciation accent to fit with his royal background.

to:

* UsefulNotes/BritishAccents: Considering that he was Romano-British, Arthur would have likely spoken the Anglicized version of Latin. Most modern adaptations simply give him a [[IAmVeryBritish standard Received Pronunciation accent accent]] to fit with his royal background.


* UsefulNotes/BritishAccents: Considering that he was Romano-British, Arthur would have likely spoken the Anglicized version of Latin. Modern adaptations simply give him a standard English RP accent to fit with his royal background.

to:

* UsefulNotes/BritishAccents: Considering that he was Romano-British, Arthur would have likely spoken the Anglicized version of Latin. Modern Most modern adaptations simply give him a standard English RP Received Pronunciation accent to fit with his royal background.


* UsefulNotes/BritishAccents: Considering that he was Romano-British, Arthur would likely spoken the Anglicized version of Latin. Modern adaptations simply give him a standard English RP accent to fit with his royal background.

to:

* UsefulNotes/BritishAccents: Considering that he was Romano-British, Arthur would have likely spoken the Anglicized version of Latin. Modern adaptations simply give him a standard English RP accent to fit with his royal background.

Added DiffLines:

* UsefulNotes/BritishAccents: Considering that he was Romano-British, Arthur would likely spoken the Anglicized version of Latin. Modern adaptations simply give him a standard English RP accent to fit with his royal background.


According to the early legend, the man who led the Britons in battle and stopped the invaders for a while was Arthur. For a while -- because the Anglo-Saxons eventually won against the Britons, eventually forming England while independent Briton rule was reduced to pockets like Wales and Cornwall. Nevertheless, the Britons kept the legend of Arthur alive. Many emigrated to Brittany in (what is today) France, eventually lending their name to the region. The Bretons, as they were eventually known, brought the legend of Arthur with them where it eventually found a new audience. More on that later.

to:

According to the early legend, the man who led the Britons in battle and stopped the invaders for a while was Arthur. For a while -- because the Anglo-Saxons eventually won against the Britons, eventually forming England while independent Briton rule was reduced to pockets like Wales UsefulNotes/{{Wales}} and Cornwall.UsefulNotes/{{Cornwall}}. Nevertheless, the Britons kept the legend of Arthur alive. Many emigrated to Brittany in (what is today) France, UsefulNotes/{{France}}, eventually lending their name to the region. The Bretons, as they were eventually known, brought the legend of Arthur with them where it eventually found a new audience. More on that later.



c.475 AD, Tintagel Peninsula, UsefulNotes/{{Cornwall}}. On this small island, Arthur is conceived. His father, Uther[[note]]according to the Welsh, Uther ap (son of) Custennin ap Cynfawr ap Tudwal ap Morfawr ap Eudaf ap Cadwr ap Cynan ap Caradoc ap Bran ap Llŷr[[/note]], [[UnrequitedLove has been lusting after Igraine, the Duchess of Cornwall]], and so convinces Merlin to [[ShapeshiftingSeducer disguise him as her husband Gorlois]]. He [[BedTrick sneaks into bed and sleeps with her]], producing Arthur, with no regard for weird lines of succession. Castle Island, Penn Du, and the Tintagel mainland contain ruins of a castle that was built nearly 1000 years later; evidence does show that it had been inhabited and not Romanised since the early millennium, though. The land is owned by the current Duke of Cornwall, who is appropriately enough [[UsefulNotes/TheHouseOfWindsor the monarch's son]].

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c.475 AD, Tintagel Peninsula, UsefulNotes/{{Cornwall}}.Cornwall. On this small island, Arthur is conceived. His father, Uther[[note]]according to the Welsh, Uther ap (son of) Custennin ap Cynfawr ap Tudwal ap Morfawr ap Eudaf ap Cadwr ap Cynan ap Caradoc ap Bran ap Llŷr[[/note]], [[UnrequitedLove has been lusting after Igraine, the Duchess of Cornwall]], and so convinces Merlin to [[ShapeshiftingSeducer disguise him as her husband Gorlois]]. He [[BedTrick sneaks into bed and sleeps with her]], producing Arthur, with no regard for weird lines of succession. Castle Island, Penn Du, and the Tintagel mainland contain ruins of a castle that was built nearly 1000 years later; evidence does show that it had been inhabited and not Romanised since the early millennium, though. The land is owned by the current Duke of Cornwall, who is appropriately enough [[UsefulNotes/TheHouseOfWindsor the monarch's son]].



* UsefulNotes/{{Wales}}: Possibly. He might have been a Romano-British man of Welsh descent.
* UsefulNotes/TheWestCountry: He may have been born in Cornwall, which is firmly located in the region. Arthur's mother Igraine was the wife of Gorlois and his rival Uther Pendragon would [[BedTrick secretly bed her]] at Tintagel which led to his birth.

to:

* UsefulNotes/{{Wales}}: Possibly. He Arthur might have been a Romano-British man warlord of Welsh descent.
* UsefulNotes/TheWestCountry: He Alternatively, he may have been born in Cornwall, which is firmly located in the region. Arthur's mother Igraine was the wife of Gorlois and his rival Uther Pendragon would [[BedTrick secretly bed her]] at Tintagel which led to his birth.

Added DiffLines:

* UsefulNotes/{{Wales}}: Possibly. He might have been a Romano-British man of Welsh descent.
* UsefulNotes/TheWestCountry: He may have been born in Cornwall, which is firmly located in the region. Arthur's mother Igraine was the wife of Gorlois and his rival Uther Pendragon would [[BedTrick secretly bed her]] at Tintagel which led to his birth.


The timing of this narrative resurgence isn't coincidental. The Anglo-Saxons, naturally enough, weren't very interested in retelling the tale of a Briton leader who fought against their ancestors -- but the Normans, who had overthrown the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms and now found themselves ruling over a mostly Anglo-Saxon population, very much were. Arthurian myth helped portray the Anglo-Saxons as barbaric and, more importantly, illegitimate usurpers and invaders, thus allowing the Normans to portray themselves as righting an ancient wrong and in a sense as picking up where Arthur left off. The real legitimate rulers of Britain would have been King Arthur's Britons -- but the Britons were all gone.

to:

The timing of this narrative resurgence isn't coincidental. The Anglo-Saxons, naturally enough, weren't very interested in retelling the tale of a Briton leader who fought against their ancestors -- but the Normans, who had overthrown the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms and now found themselves ruling over a mostly Anglo-Saxon population, very much were. Arthurian myth helped portray the Anglo-Saxons as barbaric and, more importantly, illegitimate usurpers and invaders, thus allowing the Normans to portray themselves as righting an ancient wrong and in a sense as picking up where Arthur left off. The real legitimate rulers of Britain would have been King Arthur's Britons -- but the Britons were all gone.
off.


According to the early legend, the man who led the Britons in battle and stopped the invaders for a while was Arthur. For a while - because the Anglo-Saxons eventually won against the Britons, eventually forming England while independent Briton rule was reduced to pockets like Wales and Cornwall. Nevertheless, the Britons kept the legend of Arthur alive. Many emigrated to Brittany in (what is today) France, eventually lending their name to the region. The Bretons, as they were eventually known, brought the legend of Arthur with them where it eventually found a new audience. More on that later.

Some of Arthur's earliest appearances are in pseudo-historical writings where his material has an air of folklore about it. For instance, in the battle of Mt. Badon, his climactic victory against the Anglo-Saxons, he is said to have slain hundreds of men singlehandedly. Arthur also appears in folk tales and poetry, where he is often a figure from the [[{{Heaven}} glorious Celtic afterworld]] [[LandOfFaerie Annwyn]] who would help heroes on their quests and [[BackupFromOtherworld protect the land from supernatural and mundane enemies alike]], or just [[WorldsBestWarrior a champion warrior]] and leader of men who does the same thing. He has a band of warriors under his command, many with abilities far beyond those of ordinary men. In possibly one of the earliest references to him, found in ''Y Goddodin'' - a poem lamenting/[[DoomedMoralVictor celebrating]] a Briton defeat - a man's obituary says that he slew 300 men though or despite that "he was no Arthur". And Arthur's own death is said to be at the Battle or Strife of Camlann, dying together with one Medraut. But the Britons also said that Arthur's grave was ''anoeth'', something wondrous or mysterious and exceedingly hard or impossible to see or do - in other words, there was ''no grave at all'' in the normal sense. And so they believed that he would one day come again to save them in their hour of greatest need.

to:

According to the early legend, the man who led the Britons in battle and stopped the invaders for a while was Arthur. For a while - -- because the Anglo-Saxons eventually won against the Britons, eventually forming England while independent Briton rule was reduced to pockets like Wales and Cornwall. Nevertheless, the Britons kept the legend of Arthur alive. Many emigrated to Brittany in (what is today) France, eventually lending their name to the region. The Bretons, as they were eventually known, brought the legend of Arthur with them where it eventually found a new audience. More on that later.

Some of Arthur's earliest appearances are in pseudo-historical writings where his material has an air of folklore about it. For instance, in the battle of Mt. Badon, his climactic victory against the Anglo-Saxons, he is said to have slain hundreds of men singlehandedly. Arthur also appears in folk tales and poetry, where he is often a figure from the [[{{Heaven}} glorious Celtic afterworld]] [[LandOfFaerie Annwyn]] who would help heroes on their quests and [[BackupFromOtherworld protect the land from supernatural and mundane enemies alike]], or just [[WorldsBestWarrior a champion warrior]] and leader of men who does the same thing. He has a band of warriors under his command, many with abilities far beyond those of ordinary men. In possibly one of the earliest references to him, found in ''Y Goddodin'' - -- a poem lamenting/[[DoomedMoralVictor celebrating]] a Briton defeat - -- a man's obituary says that he slew 300 men though or despite that "he was no Arthur". And Arthur's own death is said to be at the Battle or Strife of Camlann, dying together with one Medraut. But the Britons also said that Arthur's grave was ''anoeth'', something wondrous or mysterious and exceedingly hard or impossible to see or do - -- in other words, there was ''no grave at all'' in the normal sense. And sense, and so they believed that he would one day come again to save them in their hour of greatest need.



Most stories of Arthur today are based on Geoffrey of Monmouth's ''[[Literature/HistoriaRegumBritanniae History of the Kings of Britain]]'', written after the Norman Conquest of England, and where Arthur comes in near the end as the BreakoutCharacter. Geoffrey was probably the single most influential recounter of the legend. He was one of the first to call Arthur a ''king'' - in practice TheHighKing ruling over other kings - as Arthur was more often called just a ''soldier'' or ''war-leader'' in earlier material. Also, he first wrote down (perhaps made up) Arthur's OriginStory - he was conceived via a BedTrick thanks to the other Breakout Character, the wizard Myth/{{Merlin}}. Geoffrey was the first to write of Merlin, Arthur's queen Guinevere, and Arthur's sword {{Excalibur}} in their commonly recognizable forms, though their prototypical counterparts appeared in Welsh and Cornish material which was mostly recorded after Geoffrey wrote, giving historians headaches as to which really influenced which. He also wrote that after Arthur's final battle with his nephew Modred (later Mordred), he was taken away to the mystic isle of {{Avalon}} to be healed of his wounds, and implicitly wait until he is needed again.

to:

Most stories of Arthur today are based on Geoffrey of Monmouth's ''[[Literature/HistoriaRegumBritanniae History of the Kings of Britain]]'', written after the Norman Conquest of England, and where Arthur comes in near the end as the BreakoutCharacter. Geoffrey was probably the single most influential recounter of the legend. He was one of the first to call Arthur a ''king'' - -- in practice TheHighKing ruling over other kings - -- as Arthur was more often called just a ''soldier'' or ''war-leader'' in earlier material. Also, he first wrote down (perhaps made up) Arthur's OriginStory - -- he was conceived via a BedTrick thanks to the other Breakout Character, the wizard Myth/{{Merlin}}. Geoffrey was the first to write of Merlin, Arthur's queen Guinevere, and Arthur's sword {{Excalibur}} in their commonly recognizable forms, though their prototypical counterparts appeared in Welsh and Cornish material which was mostly recorded after Geoffrey wrote, giving historians headaches as to which really influenced which. He also wrote that after Arthur's final battle with his nephew Modred (later Mordred), he was taken away to the mystic isle of {{Avalon}} to be healed of his wounds, and implicitly wait until he is needed again.



The timing of this narrative resurgence isn't coincidental. The Anglo-Saxons, naturally enough, weren't very interested in retelling the tale of a Briton leader who fought against their ancestors -- but the Normans, who had overthrown the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms and now found themselves ruling over a mostly Anglo-Saxon population, very much were. Arthurian myth helped portray the Anglo-Saxons as barbaric and, more importantly, illegitimate usurpers and invaders, thus allowing the Normans to portray themselves as righting an ancient wrong and in a sense as picking up where Arthur left off. The real legitimate rulers of Britain would have been King Arthur's Britons -- but the Britons were all gone.



** In the Welsh material, his ship is named Prydwen (Fair-Face), his [[InvisibilityCloak mantle of invisibility]] is named Gwen (White), his sword (later known as Excalibur) is named Caledfwlch, which most literally translates as "Hard-Gap" or “Hard-Cleft” (i.e. "hard-cleaver", "hard-cleaving" or "cleaving what is hard") - though ''caled'' "hard" is also used poetically to mean "battle" (because battles are hard), his spear is named Rhongomyniad (Striking-Spear), his shield is named Wynebgwrthucher (Evening-Face), and his dagger is named Carnwennan (Little-White-Haft).

to:

** In the Welsh material, his ship is named Prydwen (Fair-Face), his [[InvisibilityCloak mantle of invisibility]] is named Gwen (White), his sword (later known as Excalibur) is named Caledfwlch, which most literally translates as "Hard-Gap" or “Hard-Cleft” (i.e. "hard-cleaver", "hard-cleaving" or "cleaving what is hard") - -- though ''caled'' "hard" is also used poetically to mean "battle" (because battles are hard), his spear is named Rhongomyniad (Striking-Spear), his shield is named Wynebgwrthucher (Evening-Face), and his dagger is named Carnwennan (Little-White-Haft).


* AnimalMotifs: [[OurDragonsAreDifferent Dragons]] and [[BearsAreBadNews bears,]] though the latter occurs more in modern media than in the medieval texts. Dragon elements pop up now and then, most prominently in the name "Pendragon", and the name "Arthur" is thought to be related to the Celtic word for bear. According to Geoffrey's account, his helmet had a crest shaped like a dragon, and he once dreamed of a dragon defeating a bear, which was taken to mean him as the dragon defeating his enemy the bear. A Welsh poem "The Dialogue of Arthur and the Eagle" puns on his name by calling him ''arth gwyr'', "bear of men".

to:

* AnimalMotifs: [[OurDragonsAreDifferent Dragons]] and [[BearsAreBadNews bears,]] though the latter occurs more in modern media than in the medieval texts. Dragon elements pop up now and then, most prominently in the name "Pendragon", and the name "Arthur" is thought to be related to the Celtic word for bear. According to Geoffrey's account, his helmet had a crest shaped like a dragon, and he once dreamed of a dragon defeating a bear, which was taken to mean him as the dragon defeating his enemy the bear.bear, who likely represent the Roman Empire, though this is confused as in some accounts the Romans use dragon motifs. A Welsh poem "The Dialogue of Arthur and the Eagle" puns on his name by calling him ''arth gwyr'', "bear of men".

Added DiffLines:

* HormoneAddledTeenager: In Mallory at least, he acts more like a teenager than one would expect in his early career, being kind of stupid, impulsive, and yes, rather horny, and Merlin has to reign him in a few times.


* AdaptationalVillainy: Morgan Le Fay [[IHaveManyNames AKA Morganna, Morgane, Morgante etc]] was a ''good'' witch in the original myths who helped heal King Arthur. Due to the [[HijackedByJesus influence of Christianity]], she was later turned into a WickedWitch, a portrayal continued in most modern retellings of the myths.

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* AdaptationalVillainy: Morgan Le Fay [[IHaveManyNames AKA Morganna, Morgane, Morgante etc]] was originally a ''good'' witch in the original myths who helped heal King Arthur. Due to the [[HijackedByJesus influence of Christianity]], she She was later turned into a WickedWitch, a portrayal continued in most modern retellings of the myths.

Added DiffLines:

* AdaptationalVillainy: Morgan Le Fay [[IHaveManyNames AKA Morganna, Morgane, Morgante etc]] was a ''good'' witch in the original myths who helped heal King Arthur. Due to the [[HijackedByJesus influence of Christianity]], she was later turned into a WickedWitch, a portrayal continued in most modern retellings of the myths.

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