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* OpeningACanOfClones: Another consequence of violating suspension of disbelief is that it can cause viewers to ''stop caring'' about anything that happens in a story, because if a writer persistently demonstrates that they have no qualms against contriving whatever excuses they need to in order to take the plot in whichever direction they feel like, it can dissuade viewers from even bothering to become seriously invested in anything. (E.g., if a character dies, [[FirstLawOfResurrection why should the audience believe that said death will be permanent]]? Couldn't the author just make up '''some''' excuse to bring them BackFromTheDead later?)

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* OpeningACanOfClones: Another consequence of violating suspension of disbelief is that it can cause viewers to ''stop caring'' about anything that happens in a story, because if a writer persistently demonstrates that they have no qualms against contriving [[AssPull making up whatever excuses they need to in order to take the plot in whichever direction contrivances they feel like, like]], it can dissuade viewers from even bothering to become seriously remain invested in anything. (E.g., if a character dies, [[FirstLawOfResurrection why should the audience believe that said death will be permanent]]? Couldn't the author just make up '''some''' excuse to bring them BackFromTheDead later?)



* PostModernism: Postmodernism is, by its very nature, immersion-breaking, since the defining feature of postmodern art is its tendency to question the very nature of the medium through which it is being presented, and comment on the nature of similar artistic works which preceded it. If you're looking to tell an immersive story with an engaging narrative, incorporating postmodern elements may not be the smartest thing to do.

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* PostModernism: Postmodernism is, by its very nature, immersion-breaking, fourth wall-breaking, since the defining feature of postmodern art is its tendency to question the very nature of the medium through which it is being presented, and comment on the nature of similar artistic works which preceded it. If you're looking to tell an immersive story with an a engaging narrative, incorporating postmodern elements may might not be the smartest wisest thing to do.


Creator/SamuelTaylorColeridge, the poet and author, called drama "that [[TropeNameres willing suspension of disbelief]] for the moment, which constitutes poetic faith ..."

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Creator/SamuelTaylorColeridge, the poet and author, called drama "that [[TropeNameres [[TropeNamers willing suspension of disbelief]] for the moment, which constitutes poetic faith ..."


Creator/SamuelTaylorColeridge, the poet and author, called drama "that willing suspension of disbelief for the moment, which constitutes poetic faith ..."

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Creator/SamuelTaylorColeridge, the poet and author, called drama "that [[TropeNameres willing suspension of disbelief disbelief]] for the moment, which constitutes poetic faith ..."


In other words, an author's work does not ''have'' to be realistic. It only has to be believable and [[MagicAIsMagicA internally consistent]] (and even the last requirement [[BellisariosMaxim can be relieved to some extent]]). When the author pushes an audience beyond what they're willing to accept, the work fails in the eyes of that particular audience. Viewers are usually willing to go along with [[TechnoBabble creative explanations]] for things, which is why [[ArtisticLicensePhysics people don't criticize your faster-than-light wormhole travel system]] or wonder [[AppliedPhlebotinum how a shrinking potion doesn't violate the laws of matter conservation]].

But even in the more fantastical genres, suspension of disbelief can be broken when a work breaks its own established laws or asks the audience to put up with too many things that come off as contrived. A common way of putting this is "You can ask an audience to believe the impossible, but not the improbable." For example, people will accept that [[AWizardDidIt the Grand Mage can use a magic spell to teleport across the world]], or that [[StealthInSpace the spaceship has technology that makes it completely invisible]] without rendering its own sensors blind. But the audience won't accept that the ferocious carnivore [[AssPull just happened to have a heart attack and die]] right before it would have killed the main character, or that [[HollywoodHacking the hacker guessed his enemy's password on the first try just by typing random letters]]. Without [[ChekhovsGun some prior detail]] [[JustifiedTrope justifying]] it or one of the Rules listed below coming into play, an audience is going to cry foul, and their suspended disbelief is now at the forefront of their mind. What is impossible in RealLife just has to be made the norm in the setting and kept consistent for an audience to accept it.

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In other words, an author's work does not ''have'' to be realistic. It only has to be believable and [[MagicAIsMagicA internally consistent]] (and even the last requirement [[BellisariosMaxim can be relieved to some extent]]). When the author pushes an audience beyond what they're willing to accept, the work fails in the eyes of that particular audience. Viewers are usually willing to go along with [[TechnoBabble creative explanations]] for things, which is why [[ArtisticLicensePhysics people don't criticize your faster-than-light wormhole travel system]] or wonder [[AppliedPhlebotinum how a shrinking potion doesn't violate the laws of matter conservation]].

But
conservation]], but even in the more fantastical genres, suspension of disbelief can be broken when a work breaks its own established laws or asks the audience to put up with too many things that come off as contrived. A common way of putting this is "You can ask an audience to believe the impossible, but not the improbable." For example, people will accept that [[AWizardDidIt the Grand Mage can use a magic spell to teleport across the world]], or that [[StealthInSpace the spaceship has technology that makes it completely invisible]] without rendering its own sensors blind. But the audience won't accept that the ferocious carnivore [[AssPull just happened to have a heart attack and die]] right before it would have killed the main character, or that [[HollywoodHacking the hacker guessed his enemy's password on the first try just by typing random letters]]. Without [[ChekhovsGun some prior detail]] [[JustifiedTrope justifying]] it or one of the Rules listed below coming into play, an audience is going to cry foul, and their suspended disbelief is now at the forefront of their mind. What is impossible in RealLife just has to be made the norm in the setting and kept consistent for an audience to accept it.


* PostModernism: Postmodernism is, by its very nature, immersion-breaking, since the defining feature of postmodern art is its tendency to question the very nature of the medium through which it is being presented, and comment on the nature of similar artistic works which precede it. If you're looking to tell an immersive story with an engaging narrative, incorporating postmodern elements may not be the smartest thing to do.

to:

* PostModernism: Postmodernism is, by its very nature, immersion-breaking, since the defining feature of postmodern art is its tendency to question the very nature of the medium through which it is being presented, and comment on the nature of similar artistic works which precede preceded it. If you're looking to tell an immersive story with an engaging narrative, incorporating postmodern elements may not be the smartest thing to do.


* PostModernismL Postmodernism is, by its very nature, immersion-breaking, since the defining feature of postmodern art is its tendency to question the very nature of the medium through which it is being presented, and comment on the nature of similar artistic works which precede it. If you're looking to tell an immersive story with an engaging narrative, incorporating postmodern elements may not be the smartest thing to do.

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* PostModernismL PostModernism: Postmodernism is, by its very nature, immersion-breaking, since the defining feature of postmodern art is its tendency to question the very nature of the medium through which it is being presented, and comment on the nature of similar artistic works which precede it. If you're looking to tell an immersive story with an engaging narrative, incorporating postmodern elements may not be the smartest thing to do.


* PostModernism

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* PostModernismPostModernismL Postmodernism is, by its very nature, immersion-breaking, since the defining feature of postmodern art is its tendency to question the very nature of the medium through which it is being presented, and comment on the nature of similar artistic works which precede it. If you're looking to tell an immersive story with an engaging narrative, incorporating postmodern elements may not be the smartest thing to do.


* OpeningACanOfClones: Another consequence of violating suspension of disbelief is that it can cause viewers to ''stop caring'' about anything that happens in a story, because if a writer persistently demonstrates that they have no qualms against contriving whatever excuses they need to in order to take the plot in whichever direction they feel like, it can dissuade viewers from even bothering to become seriously invested in anything. (E.g., if a character dies, why should the audience believe that said death will be permanent? For all they know, the author could just make up some excuse to bring them back from the dead in a later installment.)

to:

* OpeningACanOfClones: Another consequence of violating suspension of disbelief is that it can cause viewers to ''stop caring'' about anything that happens in a story, because if a writer persistently demonstrates that they have no qualms against contriving whatever excuses they need to in order to take the plot in whichever direction they feel like, it can dissuade viewers from even bothering to become seriously invested in anything. (E.g., if a character dies, [[FirstLawOfResurrection why should the audience believe that said death will be permanent? For all they know, permanent]]? Couldn't the author could just make up some '''some''' excuse to bring them back from the dead in a later installment.)BackFromTheDead later?)

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* OpeningACanOfClones: Another consequence of violating suspension of disbelief is that it can cause viewers to ''stop caring'' about anything that happens in a story, because if a writer persistently demonstrates that they have no qualms against contriving whatever excuses they need to in order to take the plot in whichever direction they feel like, it can dissuade viewers from even bothering to become seriously invested in anything. (E.g., if a character dies, why should the audience believe that said death will be permanent? For all they know, the author could just make up some excuse to bring them back from the dead in a later installment.)


-> ''"An eagle-eyed viewer might be able to see the wires. A pedant might be able to see the wires. But I think if you're looking at the wires you're ignoring the story. If you go to a puppet show you can see the wires. But it's about the puppets, it's not about the string. If you go to a Theatre/PunchAndJudy show and you're only watching the wires, you're a freak."''

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-> ''"An eagle-eyed viewer might be able to see the wires. A pedant might be able to see the wires. But I think if you're looking at the wires you're ignoring the story. If you go to a puppet show you can see the wires. But it's about the puppets, it's not about the string. If you go to a Theatre/PunchAndJudy Punch and Judy show and you're only watching the wires, you're a freak."''


The MST3KMantra is an exhortation to reinstate your Willing Suspension of Disbelief even if it's been broken, because "it's just a show". Similarly, BellisariosMaxim calls the audience to reinstate their [=WSOD=] by ''ignoring'' whatever {{Plot Hole}}s or other inconsistencies broke it, or that those things really ''aren't'' as important as the audience member(s) may think.

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This trope dates back at least as far as William Shakespeare and ''Theatre/HenryV'', in which the narrator directly acts the audience to "on your imaginary forces work" in order to accept a few actors running around a stage as kings and princes and the battle of Agincourt. The MST3KMantra is an exhortation to reinstate your Willing Suspension of Disbelief even if it's been broken, because "it's just a show". Similarly, BellisariosMaxim calls the audience to reinstate their [=WSOD=] by ''ignoring'' whatever {{Plot Hole}}s or other inconsistencies broke it, or that those things really ''aren't'' as important as the audience member(s) may think.


* FourthWall / NoFourthWall

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* FourthWall / NoFourthWallFourthWall[=/=]NoFourthWall



* NecessaryWeasel: When the audience knows that the trope is unlikely / impossible / unrealistic, but is willing to accept it because it's just become part of the genre. Sure, FasterThanLightTravel is impossible, but if it means that SpaceOpera can take us to some creatively interesting parts of the universe quicker than several thousand human lifespans, we're willing to suck it up and go along with it.

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* NecessaryWeasel: When the audience knows that the trope is unlikely / impossible / unrealistic, unlikely/impossible/unrealistic, but is willing to accept it because it's just become part of the genre. Sure, FasterThanLightTravel is impossible, but if it means that SpaceOpera can take us to some creatively interesting parts of the universe quicker than several thousand human lifespans, we're willing to suck it up and go along with it.


* LampshadeHanging: If the characters also agree that something doesn't make sense, the audience will be relieved.

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* LampshadeHanging: If the characters also agree that something doesn't make sense, the audience will be relieved.reassured.


* LampshadeHanging:If the characters also agree that something doesn't make sense, the audience will be relieved.

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* LampshadeHanging:If LampshadeHanging: If the characters also agree that something doesn't make sense, the audience will be relieved.


* LampshadeHanging

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* LampshadeHangingLampshadeHanging:If the characters also agree that something doesn't make sense, the audience will be relieved.

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