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* The 1983 NCAA men's tournament final between underdog North Carolina State (coached by the late Jim Valvano) and "Phi Slama Jama" from the University of Houston (which had two future Hall of Famers in Hakeem Olajuwan and Clyde Drexler) came down to the last possession tied at 52. NC State player Dereck Whittenburg launched a long shot with 3 seconds to go, but his attempt fell far short of the rim... right into the hands of teammate Lorenzo Charles, who rose up to dunk it just as time expired. They pulled this off in 5 other games on their march to the championship; out of 9 total in the Atlantic Coast Conference and NCAA tournaments, they were trailing in the final minute in 8 (3 games were won in overtime, and one was never in doubt)

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* The 1983 NCAA men's tournament final between underdog North Carolina State (coached by the late Jim Valvano) and "Phi Slama Jama" from the University of Houston (which had two future Hall of Famers in Hakeem Olajuwan Olajuwon and Clyde Drexler) came down to the last possession tied at 52. NC State player Dereck Whittenburg launched a long shot with 3 seconds to go, but his attempt fell far short of the rim... right into the hands of teammate Lorenzo Charles, who rose up to dunk it just as time expired. They pulled this off in 5 other games on their march to the championship; out of 9 total in the Atlantic Coast Conference and NCAA tournaments, they were trailing in the final minute in 8 (3 games were won in overtime, and one was never in doubt)


* The 1983 NCAA men's tournament final between underdog North Carolina State (coached by the late Jim Valvano) and "Phi Slama Jama" from the University of Houston (which had two future NBA All-Stars in Hakeem Olajuwan and Clyde Drexler) came down to the last possession tied at 52. NC State player Dereck Whittenburg launched a long shot with 3 seconds to go, but his attempt fell far short of the rim... right into the hands of teammate Lorenzo Charles, who rose up to dunk it just as time expired. They pulled this off in 5 other games on their march to the championship, out of 9 total, 8 of which they were losing in the final minute (3 games were won in overtime, and one was never in doubt)

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* The 1983 NCAA men's tournament final between underdog North Carolina State (coached by the late Jim Valvano) and "Phi Slama Jama" from the University of Houston (which had two future NBA All-Stars Hall of Famers in Hakeem Olajuwan and Clyde Drexler) came down to the last possession tied at 52. NC State player Dereck Whittenburg launched a long shot with 3 seconds to go, but his attempt fell far short of the rim... right into the hands of teammate Lorenzo Charles, who rose up to dunk it just as time expired. They pulled this off in 5 other games on their march to the championship, championship; out of 9 total, 8 of which total in the Atlantic Coast Conference and NCAA tournaments, they were losing trailing in the final minute in 8 (3 games were won in overtime, and one was never in doubt)



* UsefulNotes/TheWorldCup had a few other than the USA one above, such as Italy winning the 2006 round of 16 over Australia with a penalty kick at the last minute. The "actually in overtime" variant ("Who Needs Penalties") like the Olympics example above happened twice as well, England 1-0 Belgium in the 1990 round of 16, and Italy 2-0 Germany (yes, 2 goals, at 119' and '''121''') in the 2006 semifinal.
* In the 2013 [[UsefulNotes/CollegiateAmericanFootball Iron Bowl]], the Alabama Crimson Tide were ranked number 1 in the nation, and they were playing their rivals, number 4 Auburn, for the first winner-to-the-SEC-Championship Iron Bowl in history. Following an Auburn drive that scored a touchdown, tying the game 28-28 with only 34 seconds to go, Bama took over in their territory. Bama running back T. J. Yeldon got to the Auburn 38 before being pushed out of bounds by Auburn cornerback Chris Davis just as time expired, which stopped the clock. The play was reviewed, and one second was put back on the clock. Alabama attempted a 57-yard field goal. If it missed, the game would just go to overtime. Their starter had missed three earlier that game, so they put in the backup. He kicked the ball well, but it fell short, where ''that same Chris Davis''[[note]]who was ''also'' Auburn's punt returner[[/note]] waited. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s4-9n9--_hg Davis then took the ball all the way back to the Alabama endzone to win the game 34-28]].

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* UsefulNotes/TheWorldCup had a few other than the USA one above, such as Italy winning the 2006 round of 16 over Australia with a penalty kick at the last minute. The "actually in overtime" variant ("Who Needs Penalties") like the Olympics example above happened twice three times as well, England 1-0 Belgium in the 1990 round of 16, Germany 2–1 Sweden in sudden death[[note]]from 1993 to 2004, the first goal in extra time ended the match[[/note]] in the 2003 women's final, and Italy 2-0 Germany (yes, 2 goals, at 119' and '''121''') in the 2006 semifinal.
* In the 2013 [[UsefulNotes/CollegiateAmericanFootball Iron Bowl]], the Alabama Crimson Tide were ranked number 1 in the nation, and they were playing their rivals, number 4 Auburn, for the first winner-to-the-SEC-Championship Iron Bowl in history. Following an Auburn drive that scored a touchdown, tying the game 28-28 with only 34 seconds to go, Bama took over in their territory. Bama running back T. J. Yeldon got to the Auburn 38 before being pushed out of bounds by Auburn cornerback Chris Davis just as time expired, which stopped the clock. The play was reviewed, and one second was put back on the clock. Alabama attempted a 57-yard field goal. If it missed, the game would just go to overtime. Their starter had missed three earlier that game, so they put in the backup. He kicked the ball well, but it fell short, where ''that same Chris Davis''[[note]]who was ''also'' Auburn's punt returner[[/note]] waited. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s4-9n9--_hg Davis then took the ball all the way back to the Alabama endzone end zone to win the game 34-28]].


* ''Manga/AceOfDiamond'': In the finals of the Summer Tournament between Seidou and Inashiro, by the bottom part of the 9th inning Seidou is one run ahead on the scoreboard, but Inashiro's coach tells his players they don't need to score two runs, just one, since they'll be guaranteed to win in extra innings. However, Inashiro's ace player, Mei Narumiya, ends up scoring a walk-off homerun with bases loaded to get them ahead and win the game right then and there.

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* ''Manga/AceOfDiamond'': ''Manga/DiamondNoAce'': In the finals of the Summer Tournament between Seidou and Inashiro, by the bottom part of the 9th inning Seidou is one run ahead on the scoreboard, but Inashiro's coach tells his players they don't need to score two runs, just one, since they'll be guaranteed to win in extra innings. However, Inashiro's ace player, Mei Narumiya, ends up scoring a walk-off homerun with bases loaded to get them ahead and win the game right then and there.



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* ''Manga/AceOfDiamond'': In the finals of the Summer Tournament between Seidou and Inashiro, by the bottom part of the 9th inning Seidou is one run ahead on the scoreboard, but Inashiro's coach tells his players they don't need to score two runs, just one, since they'll be guaranteed to win in extra innings. However, Inashiro's ace player, Mei Narumiya, ends up scoring a walk-off homerun with bases loaded to get them ahead and win the game right then and there.


* An example from before overtime existed: In the 1984 Orange Bowl, Nebraska scored a touchdown to pull within 1 point of Miami. Rather than call for the extra point kick and a tie ''and'' almost certainly the National Championship, coach Tom Osborne called for a 2-point conversion play (which would win the game but is significantly riskier). The conversion failed and Miami won the National Championship. (Also averted. See the ''Necessary Roughness'' example below.)

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* An example from before overtime existed: In the 1984 Orange Bowl, Nebraska scored a touchdown to pull within 1 point of Miami. Rather than call for the extra point kick and a tie ''and'' almost certainly the National Championship, coach Tom Osborne called for a 2-point conversion play (which would win the game but is significantly riskier). The conversion failed and Miami won the National Championship. (Also averted. See the ''Necessary Roughness'' example below.under "Film".)


-->''We always go all the way.\\
Yeah and that's why most of us are in here.''

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-->''We -->''Hell, guys, we're convicts. We always go all the way.for it all.\\
Yeah and Unfortunately, that's why most of us are we're all in here.the joint.''

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Although just about any spectator will tell you that overtime is always exciting to watch (especially in sports where it's "sudden death", i.e., next score wins), there are a few reasons why the main characters or the author may choose to forego overtime play:
* A team may play to win ''now'' due to pride not allowing them to countenance the idea that this other RagtagBunchOfMisfits even got so far as tying them at the end of regulation and the fact that [[WeWinBecauseYouDidnt they needed more time than normal to settle the obvious fact that they're the better team]] might in itself be abhorrent to them.
* On the more rational side, a coach may decide to play to end the game now, win or lose, rather than go into overtime because he believes they have a better chance at winning by gambling everything on one play now than a whole extra period of play -- maybe the other team's offense is known to be ''really'' good and would likely score in overtime first and therefore win (not an uncommon train of thought in American football, in situations where the underdog team scores a last-minute touchdown and goes for the two-point conversion to win rather than the safer one-point PAT kick to tie), or maybe the coach sees that his players are getting fatigued and might not be able to hold up through overtime.
* On the author's side, adding overtime runs the risk of violating TheLawOfConservationOfDetail as it can drag the story on longer than it ought to unless the author is able to work something new into the situation -- for example, the star player on the team got injured on the game-tying score and now the team has to figure out on the fly how to play without them.


* In the 2013 [[UsefulNotes/CollegiateAmericanFootball Iron Bowl]], the Alabama Crimson Tide were ranked number 1 in the nation, and they were playing their rivals, number 4 Auburn, for the first winner-to-the-SEC-Championship Iron Bowl in history. Following an Auburn drive that scored a touchdown, tying the game 28-28 with only 34 seconds to go, Bama took over in their territory. Auburn stopped them from scoring and even forced a player out of bounds just as time expired, which stopped the clock. The play was reviewed, and one second was put back on the clock. Alabama attempted a 57-yard field goal. If it missed, the game would just go to overtime. Their starter had missed three earlier that game, so they put in the backup. He kicked the ball well, but it fell short, where Auburn returner Chris Davis waited. Davis then took the ball all the way back to the Alabama endzone to win the game 34-28.
** This play can be viewed [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s4-9n9--_hg here]].

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* In the 2013 [[UsefulNotes/CollegiateAmericanFootball Iron Bowl]], the Alabama Crimson Tide were ranked number 1 in the nation, and they were playing their rivals, number 4 Auburn, for the first winner-to-the-SEC-Championship Iron Bowl in history. Following an Auburn drive that scored a touchdown, tying the game 28-28 with only 34 seconds to go, Bama took over in their territory. Bama running back T. J. Yeldon got to the Auburn stopped them from scoring and even forced a player 38 before being pushed out of bounds by Auburn cornerback Chris Davis just as time expired, which stopped the clock. The play was reviewed, and one second was put back on the clock. Alabama attempted a 57-yard field goal. If it missed, the game would just go to overtime. Their starter had missed three earlier that game, so they put in the backup. He kicked the ball well, but it fell short, where Auburn returner ''that same Chris Davis Davis''[[note]]who was ''also'' Auburn's punt returner[[/note]] waited. Davis then took the ball all the way back to the Alabama endzone to win the game 34-28.
** This play can be viewed
[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s4-9n9--_hg here]].Davis then took the ball all the way back to the Alabama endzone to win the game 34-28]].

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* Similar to the above example, the Los Angeles Chargers scored a potentially game-tying touchdown against the Kansas City Chiefs with four seconds left in the fourth quarter. Rather than kick the extra point, LA went for two—and QB Philip Rivers connected with WR Mike Williams for a wide open conversion. The Chargers won 29-28.


* A Who Needs Sudden Death? variation in the 2003 Rugby World Cup final: a winning drop-goal in extra-time from Jonny Wilkinson with 17 seconds to go, replying to a last minute penalty from Elton Flatley of Australia, averted rugby union's first ever sudden-death third extra-time period to win the tournament for England.

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* A Who Needs Sudden Death? variation in the 2003 Rugby World Cup final: a winning drop-goal in extra-time from Jonny Wilkinson with 17 27 seconds to go, replying to a last minute penalty from Elton Flatley of Australia, averted rugby union's first ever sudden-death third extra-time period to win the tournament for England.


* In the 2003 Rugby World Cup, a last second winning drop-goal in extra-time from Jonny Wilkinson, replying to a last minute penalty from Elton Flatley of Australia, averted rugby union's first ever sudden-death third extra-time period to win the tournament for England.
** But they were already in extra time (Commonwealth English for "overtime").

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* In A Who Needs Sudden Death? variation in the 2003 Rugby World Cup, Cup final: a last second winning drop-goal in extra-time from Jonny Wilkinson, Wilkinson with 17 seconds to go, replying to a last minute penalty from Elton Flatley of Australia, averted rugby union's first ever sudden-death third extra-time period to win the tournament for England.
** But they were already in extra time (Commonwealth English for "overtime").
England.


* In the 1988 World Series, Los Angeles Dodgers manager Tommy Lasorda knew that star slugger Kirk Gibson was too banged up to play in the field or run the bases; the only way he could be of any use to the team was to go to the plate and hit a home run. With the Dodgers trailing the Oakland Athletics by one run with two out in the bottom of the ninth inning of Game One, rather than send Gibson to the plate with a chance to tie the game, he sent utility player Mike Davis to the plate instead. After Davis worked a walk, Lasorda ''then'' sent Gibson to the plate with a chance to win the game. Up against the league's best closer, Dennis Eckersley. And if you don't know what happened next, you obviously are not a baseball fan.

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* In the 1988 World Series, Los Angeles Dodgers manager Tommy Lasorda knew that star slugger Kirk Gibson was too banged up to play in the field or run the bases; the only way he could be of any use to the team was to go to the plate and hit a home run. With the Dodgers trailing the Oakland Athletics by one run with two out in the bottom of the ninth inning of Game One, rather than send Gibson to the plate with a chance to tie the game, he sent utility player Mike Davis to the plate instead. After Davis worked a walk, Lasorda ''then'' sent Gibson to the plate with a chance to win the game. Up against the league's best closer, Dennis Eckersley. And if you don't know what happened next, you obviously are not a baseball fan. [[spoiler: On a 3-2 pitch, Gibson homered off of Eck's famous slider and gave the Dodgers the win 5-4.]]

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* In 2016, the Cleveland Browns had been going the entire season without any wins or ties. That is, until their second-to-last game against the then-San Diego Chargers on Christmas Eve (which was also the Browns' last home game that season). In the last seconds of the game, the Chargers were behind 20-17 and were attempting a field goal to force them into overtime. Instead, the Chargers missed it, [[ChristmasMiracle and the Browns averted a winless season]].


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* ''Manga/{{Eyeshield 21}}'':

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* ''Manga/{{Eyeshield 21}}'': 21}}'':



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** During the final game against the Hawks, Charlie Conway is awarded a penalty shot after time expires in regulation with the game tied. [[CrowningMomentofAwesome He scores to win the championship for the Ducks]].

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** During the final game against the Hawks, Charlie Conway is awarded a penalty shot after time expires in regulation with the game tied. [[CrowningMomentofAwesome He scores to win the championship for the Ducks]].Ducks.



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*** [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome "Can Manchester United score? They ALWAYS score..."]]. It has been noticed many times that [[HomeFieldAdvantage referees at Old Trafford tend to suffer from a different sense of the passage of time]], and add unfeasible amounts of extra time seemingly unjustified by actual stoppages in play. This phenomenon has been referred to as "Fergie Time", for some reason.

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*** [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome "Can Manchester United score? They ALWAYS score..."]].". It has been noticed many times that [[HomeFieldAdvantage referees at Old Trafford tend to suffer from a different sense of the passage of time]], and add unfeasible amounts of extra time seemingly unjustified by actual stoppages in play. This phenomenon has been referred to as "Fergie Time", for some reason.



* In the 2014 MLB National League Championship Series, the San Francisco Giants played the St. Louis Cardinals for the second time in three years, and for the Giants, it was their third time in said series in five years. The teams split the series in St. Louis, and San Francisco won the first two in San Fran. Going into the bottom of the 9th inning of Game 5, the score was 3-3. Two Giants got on base and Travis Ishikawa stepped up and hit a 3-run walk-off home run to win it and send the Giants to the World Series for the third time in five years.

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* In the 2014 MLB National League Championship Series, the San Francisco Giants played the St. Louis Cardinals for the second time in three years, and for the Giants, it was their third time in said series in five years. The teams split the series in St. Louis, and San Francisco won the first two in San Fran. Going into the bottom of the 9th inning of Game 5, the score was 3-3. Two Giants got on base and Travis Ishikawa stepped up and hit a 3-run walk-off home run to win it and send the Giants to the World Series for the third time in five years.years.
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