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* DanceSensation[=/=]HappyDance: In prosperous times like these, dances like The Shimmy, The Charleston and The Black Bottom would set the dance floor ablaze with sensational flappers cutting the rug. The former was banned as bootleg, yet praised as a good aerobic dance; the latter two became the rage during the rest of the decade. Later in the decade, following Charles Lindbergh's successful transatlantic flight in 1927, a dance craze involving swinging moves was named after him, and it was called the Lindy Hop. Creator/JosephineBaker became a dance sensation in Paris.

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* DanceSensation[=/=]HappyDance: DanceSensation:
** [[HappyDance
In prosperous times like these, these]], dances like The Shimmy, The Charleston and The Black Bottom would set the dance floor ablaze with sensational flappers cutting the rug. The former was banned as bootleg, yet praised as a good aerobic dance; the latter two became the rage during the rest of the decade. decade.
**
Later in the decade, following Charles Lindbergh's successful transatlantic flight in 1927, a dance craze involving swinging moves was named after him, and it was called the Lindy Hop. Much like any other dance fads of the decade, surely the Lindy Hop [[TheGreatDepression wouldn't last]] [[TheForties a year]], right?
**
Creator/JosephineBaker became a dance sensation in Paris.

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* Empire of Sin is set in the Roaring 20's.


* Invoked in the ''Series/StarTrekTOS'' episode "A Piece of the Action". Although set in the far future the ''Enterprise'' encounters a planet which based its culture around a book left behind by a previous expedition, ''Chicago Mobs of the Twenties''. A [[PlanetOfHats planet of fedoras]] indeed.

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* Invoked in the ''Series/StarTrekTOS'' ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' episode "A Piece of the Action". Although set in the far future the ''Enterprise'' encounters a planet which based its culture around a book left behind by a previous expedition, ''Chicago Mobs of the Twenties''. A [[PlanetOfHats planet of fedoras]] indeed.


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* ''Series/TheTwilightZone1959'': In "[[Recap/TheTwilightZoneS2E45TheTroubleWithTempleton The Trouble with Templeton]]", Booth Templeton continually hearkens back to the 1920s when he was young and his beloved wife Laura and his best friend Barney Flueger were still alive to the point that he no longer lives in the present.


This period lasted sometime after UsefulNotes/WorldWarI till the [[TheGreatDepression Crash of 1929 or just before the New Deal of 1933]], or the entire Prohibition era (1920-1933). In cultural terms however, the 20s didn't end until ''1935''. Understandably, there was much nostalgia for this period as soon as it ended, with a lot of 1930's movies (especially the gangster ones) being set during this decade, and it was often a nostalgic setting during TheForties, TheFifties, TheSixties, and well into TheSeventies and TheEighties. Actually, it has gotten to the point of people from almost a century later still relating to this decade.

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This period lasted sometime after UsefulNotes/WorldWarI till the [[TheGreatDepression Crash of 1929 1929]], or just before the New Deal of 1933]], 1933, or the entire Prohibition era (1920-1933). In cultural terms however, the 20s might have started with the first jazz recording in 1917, and didn't end until ''1935''. Understandably, there was much nostalgia for this period as soon as it ended, with a lot of 1930's movies (especially the gangster ones) being set during this decade, and it was often a nostalgic setting during TheForties, TheFifties, TheSixties, and well into TheSeventies and TheEighties. Actually, it has gotten to the point of people from almost a century later still relating to this decade.


The setting of many an [[GenteelInterbellumSetting Agatha Christie]] mystery, this is one era that absolutely lives up to the stereotypes and then some. The [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarI Great War]] was over, (most of) the Western world had never been so prosperous -- time to [[ItIsPronouncedTroPAY par-]]''[[ItIsPronouncedTroPAY tay]]''! And after four years of trench warfare ''and'' a flu pandemic that killed around ''100 million'' people, most everybody needed cheering up.

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The setting of many an [[GenteelInterbellumSetting Agatha Christie]] mystery, this is one era that absolutely lives up to the stereotypes and then some. The [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarI Great War]] was over, (most of) the Western world had never been so prosperous -- time to [[ItIsPronouncedTroPAY par-]]''[[ItIsPronouncedTroPAY tay]]''! And after four years of trench warfare ''and'' a flu pandemic that killed around ''100 million'' people, most everybody needed cheering up.



Characters include gangsters and G-men, flappers and their "sheiks" (sort of proto-{{metrosexual}} young males -- the name comes from ''Film/TheSheik''), languid white movie idols and jolly black jazz singers and dancers, and lots of cheery collegiate types who wear huge fur coats, straw hats and wide "Oxford bags" (flared trousers) and play ukuleles while [[DanceSensation dancing the Charleston]] and shouting "[[TwentyThree 23]] skidoo!" People sat on flagpoles and swallowed live goldfish, and stunt men swung golf clubs and played tennis while standing atop airplanes in flight. The basic idea was to shock, amaze and amuse at all costs; there were apparently some women of the era who would greet their guests ''in the bath''.

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Characters include gangsters and G-men, flappers and their "sheiks" (sort of proto-{{metrosexual}} young males -- the name comes from ''Film/TheSheik''), languid white movie idols and jolly black jazz singers and dancers, and lots of cheery collegiate types who wear huge fur coats, straw hats and wide "Oxford bags" (flared trousers) and play ukuleles while [[DanceSensation dancing the Charleston]] and shouting "[[TwentyThree 23]] skidoo!" People sat on flagpoles and swallowed live goldfish, and stunt men swung golf clubs and played tennis while standing atop airplanes in flight. The basic idea was to shock, amaze and amuse at all costs; there were apparently some women of the era who would greet their guests ''in the bath''.



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* ''Literature/TheDiviners2012'' (pub. 2012)

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* ''Literature/TheDiviners2012'' (pub. 2012)''Literature/TheDiviners2012''



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* [[Recap/CharmedS2E14PardonMyPast "Pardon My Past"]], an episode of ''Series/Charmed1998'', Prue, Piper and Phoebe time-travel back to the Twenties.
* ''Series/DowntonAbbey'': Starting in Series 3.

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* ''Series/Charmed1998'': In [[Recap/CharmedS2E14PardonMyPast "Pardon My Past"]], an episode of ''Series/Charmed1998'', Prue, Piper and Phoebe time-travel back to the Twenties.
'20s.
* ''Series/DowntonAbbey'': Starting ''Series/DoctorWho'': A few stories, notably [[Recap/DoctorWhoS19E5BlackOrchid "Black Orchid"]] and [[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E7TheUnicornAndTheWasp "The Unicorn and the Wasp"]].
* ''Series/DowntonAbbey'', starting
in Series 3.



* ''Series/ZTheBeginningOfEverything'' begins in 1917 but gets to the 20s by the fifth episode of so, showing how Zelda Fitzgerald embraced TheFlapper lifestyle, and she and her husband Creator/FScottFitzgerald got famous for their rowdy partying.

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* ''Series/ZTheBeginningOfEverything'' begins in 1917 but gets to the 20s by the fifth episode of so, episode, showing how Zelda Fitzgerald embraced TheFlapper lifestyle, and she and her husband Creator/FScottFitzgerald got famous for their rowdy partying.



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* ''Film/TheGreatGatsby''

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* ''Film/TheGreatGatsby''''The Great Gatsby''


* ''Film/{{The Great Gatsby|1974}}'' (1974)
* ''Film/TheGreatGatsby'' (2013)

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* ''Film/TheGreatGatsby''
** ''Film/{{The Great Gatsby|1926}}'' (1926)
** ''Film/{{The Great Gatsby|1949}}'' (1949)
**
''Film/{{The Great Gatsby|1974}}'' (1974)
* ''Film/TheGreatGatsby'' ** ''Film/{{The Great Gatsby|2013}}'' (2013)


** UsefulNotes/CocoChanel: co-pioneer of TheFlapper chic, debuted Parfum #5 and the LittleBlackDress, focused on simple and sporty cuts;
** UsefulNotes/JeanPatou: Chanel's contemporary, also codifying TheFlapper, the guy who shortened the hemlines to the knees, only to lengthen it back later in the decade.
** UsefulNotes/MadeleineVionnet: perfected the bias-cut [[note]]a method of slanting the seams, which would hug the body and would make a flowing, draping effect[[/note]] in 1922.

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** UsefulNotes/CocoChanel: co-pioneer of TheFlapper chic, debuted Parfum #5 her trademark No. 5 perfume and the codifier of the LittleBlackDress, focused on adding ropes of pearls juxtaposed on simple and sporty cuts;
** UsefulNotes/JeanPatou: Chanel's contemporary, also codifying TheFlapper, introduced casual and sportswear in women's fashion, the first designer to put monograms on garments, the guy who shortened the hemlines to the knees, only to lengthen it back later in the decade.
** UsefulNotes/MadeleineVionnet: trademark includes Grecian-style draped dresses, perfected the bias-cut [[note]]a method of slanting the seams, which would hug the body and would make a flowing, draping effect[[/note]] in 1922.1922, and would become a 1930s staple.


** CoolCrown: Though not royalty, tiara and the feathered sequinned headbands, at least on the first half of the decade, gave added glamour in the evening.



** [[ZettaiRyouiki Short Skirt And Knee Socks]]: While modern depictions of flappers are shown in grade A or B, actual flappers with their knee-length skirts and rolled stockings often go for grade C.



** CoolCrown: Though not royalty, the feathered sequinned headbands give added glamour in the evening.

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** CoolCrown: Though not royalty, {{Qipao}}: Chinese flappers (called ''modeng xiaojie'') and socialites started to wear these high-slit, figure hugging dresses in contrast to the feathered sequinned headbands give added glamour loose Western dresses and in reaction to the evening.loose robes of the Qing dynasty.
** ShesGotLegs: For the first time ever since the age of antiquity, and whether she had Knee Socks or none, legs were revealed, and they're ''way'' past the ankles.
** [[ZettaiRyouiki Short Skirt And Knee Socks]]: While modern depictions of flappers are shown in grade A or B, actual flappers with their knee-length skirts and rolled stockings often go for grade C.



* NiceHat: Fedoras, homburgs, bowlers, newsboy caps, straw hats and top hats for men; tight-fitting, head-hugging swanky cloche hats for women.

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* NiceHat: Fedoras, homburgs, bowlers, newsboy caps, straw hats and top hats for men; berets and tight-fitting, head-hugging swanky cloche hats for women.women.
* OldTimeyAnkleTaboo: Became really old hat when the skirts barely covered the ''kneecaps'', and when the flaming youth poked fun of it.



* ShesGotLegs: For the first time since antiquity. Whether she had Knee Socks or none.

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* ''VideoGame/CultistSimulator''

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[[folder: Professional Wrestling]]
* Wrestling/EdStranglerLewis
[[/folder]]


Dresses are short and so is ladies' hair. Bobbed hair had actually emerged earlier, around 1915, and was popularized during the late 1910s out of convenience during [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarI the war]], as well as through the earlier 1920s. Hemlines gradually rose from ankle to calf-length during the [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarI First World War]] and to knee-length by 1925. Hosiery and high heels were on display, and younger women sometimes rolled down the tops of their stockings and applied rouge to their knees. Despite those costumes you buy these days, most dresses were not fringed or figure-hugging, and above-the-knee hemlines were nonexistent for grown women at any time. Dresses had boxy and boyish silhouettes, dropped waists and were minimally or highly decorated depending on the occasion. Women's hat styles included a head-hugging shape called a ''cloché'' (after the French word for "bell").

Characters include gangsters and G-men, flappers and their "sheiks" (sort of proto-{{metrosexual}} young males), languid white movie idols and jolly black jazz singers and dancers, and lots of cheery collegiate types who wear huge fur coats, straw hats and wide "Oxford bags" (flared trousers) and play ukuleles while [[DanceSensation dancing the Charleston]] and shouting "[[TwentyThree 23]] skidoo!" People sat on flagpoles and swallowed live goldfish, and stunt men swung golf clubs and played tennis while standing atop airplanes in flight. The basic idea was to shock, amaze and amuse at all costs; there were apparently some women of the era who would greet their guests ''in the bath''.

The fun and excitement is only heightened by the fact that much of it is totally illegal, at least in the USA. There Prohibition is in full swing, so gin is made in bathtubs, smuggled by the likes of UsefulNotes/AlCapone and served in 'speakeasies', hole-in-the-wall bars highly prone to raids by stolid, humourless cops, or an ambush by the eccentric [[https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Izzy_Einstein_and_Moe_Smith Izzy and Moe]] prohibition agent team in disguise. Hip flasks are handy for taking your booze along for the ride, and the mixers in cocktails will take the edge off the cheap stuff. Unless you're Treasury Agent Eliot Ness or one of his elite team of incorruptible agents, [[Series/TheUntouchables The Untouchables]], be extra cautious to never insult a tough-looking Italian in a sharp suit, or you'll find yourself looking down the barrel of a Tommy Gun (some of those Jewish and Irish guys are no pushovers either).

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Dresses are short and so is ladies' hair. Bobbed hair had actually emerged earlier, around 1915, and was popularized during the late 1910s out of convenience during [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarI the war]], as well as through the earlier 1920s. Hemlines gradually rose from ankle to calf-length during the [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarI First World War]] and to knee-length by 1925. Hosiery and high heels were on display, and younger women sometimes rolled down the tops of their stockings and applied rouge to their knees. Despite those costumes you buy these days, most dresses were not fringed fringed[[note]]Elaborate, sparkling beadwork and embroidery were much more common and those were not for everyday; they were [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oizYj85IgHA intended for parties and dancing]][[/note]] or figure-hugging, figure-hugging[[note]]the ideal was a straight, boyish silhouette known as the ''garçon'' look[[/note]], and above-the-knee hemlines were nonexistent for grown women at any time. Dresses had boxy and boyish silhouettes, dropped waists and were minimally or highly decorated depending on the occasion. Since all this was handmade, you'd pay a lot more for a fancier outfit. Tiered ruffles were also popular[[note]]you'll see Mary wearing one in the school dance scene in ''Film/ItsAWonderfulLife''[[/note]] Women's hat styles included a head-hugging shape called a ''cloché'' (after the French word for "bell").

Characters include gangsters and G-men, flappers and their "sheiks" (sort of proto-{{metrosexual}} young males), males -- the name comes from ''Film/TheSheik''), languid white movie idols and jolly black jazz singers and dancers, and lots of cheery collegiate types who wear huge fur coats, straw hats and wide "Oxford bags" (flared trousers) and play ukuleles while [[DanceSensation dancing the Charleston]] and shouting "[[TwentyThree 23]] skidoo!" People sat on flagpoles and swallowed live goldfish, and stunt men swung golf clubs and played tennis while standing atop airplanes in flight. The basic idea was to shock, amaze and amuse at all costs; there were apparently some women of the era who would greet their guests ''in the bath''.

The fun and excitement is only heightened by the fact that much of it is totally illegal, at least in the USA. There Prohibition is in full swing, so gin is made in bathtubs, smuggled by the likes of UsefulNotes/AlCapone and served in 'speakeasies', hole-in-the-wall bars highly prone to raids by stolid, humourless cops, or an ambush by the eccentric [[https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Izzy_Einstein_and_Moe_Smith Izzy and Moe]] prohibition agent team in disguise. Hip flasks are handy for taking your booze along for the ride, and the mixers in cocktails will take the edge off the cheap stuff. Unless you're Treasury Agent Eliot Ness or one of his elite team of incorruptible agents, [[Series/TheUntouchables The Untouchables]], be extra cautious to never insult a tough-looking Italian in a sharp suit, or you'll find yourself looking down the barrel of a Tommy Gun (some of those Jewish [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jewish-American_organized_crime Jewish]] and Irish [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irish_Mob Irish]] guys are no pushovers either).


* ''VideoGame/{{Draugen}}'' is set in 1923, taking place in a small Norweigan village.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Draugen}}'' is set in 1923, is a more subdued take on the period than most, taking place in a small Norweigan village.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Draugen}}'' is set in 1923, taking place in a small Norweigan village.

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* ''Film/DowntonAbbey''

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