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** ''Literature/FeminineIntuition'': The designers of a subtly [[FemBot feminine-looking robot]] believe that everyone will assume it is mentally inferior to other robots. One character explicitly states that if there's ''anything'' the average person believes, it's that women are less intelligent than men. Upon saying this, he nervously glances around (Dr Susan Calvin having recently retired). At the end, after Dr Calvin comes back to save the day, the [[AnAesop lesson]] is that men dismiss women's equal (if not superior) intelligence as mere "intuition".

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** ''Literature/FeminineIntuition'': "Literature/FeminineIntuition": The designers of a subtly [[FemBot feminine-looking robot]] believe that everyone will assume it is mentally inferior to other robots. One character explicitly states that if there's ''anything'' the average person believes, it's that women are less intelligent than men. Upon saying this, he nervously glances around (Dr Susan Calvin having recently retired). At the end, after Dr Calvin comes back to save the day, the [[AnAesop lesson]] is that men dismiss women's equal (if not superior) intelligence as mere "intuition".


** See also the opening of ''Film/DemolitionMan'', which shows about 10% of the city on fire ([[MonumentalDamage including the Hollywood sign]]), gangs with ''anti-aircraft'' weapons and police riding military grade Humvees... in 1996 (just ''three'' years after the film's release, making it even more ridiculous than most of them). This is mostly to crank up the conrast with the 2032 world, where crime is so low that the police have basically forgotten what it is.
** ''Film/EscapeFromNewYork'', in 1981, predicted that by 1997 crime rates would have risen to such catastrophic levels that the Manhattan Island would be turned into a penal colony for containing all the convicts. While the high crime rates of the 1970s-80s make it look more plausible then, the fact they started falling just ten years on left it looking silly when the actual 1997 rolled around.

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** See also the opening of ''Film/DemolitionMan'', which shows about 10% of the city on fire ([[MonumentalDamage including the Hollywood sign]]), gangs with ''anti-aircraft'' weapons and police riding military grade Humvees... in 1996 (just ''three'' years after the film's release, making it even more ridiculous than most of them). This is mostly to crank up the conrast contrast with the 2032 world, where crime is so low that the police have basically forgotten what it is.
** ''Film/EscapeFromNewYork'', in 1981, predicted that by 1997 crime rates would have risen to such catastrophic levels that the Manhattan Island would be turned into a penal colony for containing all the convicts. While the high crime rates of the 1970s-80s make made it look more plausible then, the fact they started falling just ten years on left it looking silly when the actual 1997 rolled around.



* There's a weird example of this in the movie adaptation of ''Film/AtlasShrugged'', where Hank Rearden is blackmailed into signing away the rights to Rearden Metal because government officials have incriminating evidence of his extra-marital affair with Dagny Taggart, a subplot that comes straight from the novel. Thing is, in 1957 when the book was published, such an affair would've been considered a pretty big deal and might've irreparably damaged both his and Taggart's reputation. But since the movie places the story in [[TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture 2016]], the idea that such a thing would cause anything but a minor scandal--let alone convince Rearden to sign away his life's work, which he swore he would never do--just comes across as bizarre.
** Even more bizarre when you consider author of the book Ayn Rand's long extramarital affair with Nathaniel Branden, which actually started around the same year the book came out (although they kept it secret-from everyone ''but'' their respective spouses, ironically).
** Most of the fundamental economic philosophy espoused in the movie has gone from a potentially viable alternative to partially socialized economies to completely discredited empirically in the years since the book was written, too, and it shows. Most jarringly for viewers even slightly familiar with corporate practices is the idea that existing, successful companies would fail due to what amounts to one of the venture capitalists that funded the start-up bowing out. Not only does that not happen, but buying into companies early and cashing out once they've succeeded is how venture capitalists make their money; what happened to Rearden is the standard procedure for people in his position and largely thought to benefit the capitalist more than anyone else.

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* There's a weird example of this in the movie adaptation of ''Film/AtlasShrugged'', where Hank Rearden is blackmailed into signing away the rights to Rearden Metal because government officials have incriminating evidence of his extra-marital extramarital affair with Dagny Taggart, a subplot that comes straight from the novel. Thing is, in 1957 when the book was published, such an affair would've been considered a pretty big deal and might've irreparably damaged both his and Taggart's reputation. But since the movie places the story in [[TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture 2016]], the idea that such a thing would cause anything but a minor scandal--let alone convince Rearden to sign away his life's work, which he swore he would never do--just comes across as bizarre.
** Even more bizarre when you consider author of the book Ayn Rand's long extramarital affair with Nathaniel Branden, which actually started around the same year the book came out (although they kept it secret-from secret from everyone ''but'' their respective spouses, ironically).
** Most of the fundamental economic philosophy espoused in the movie has gone from a potentially viable alternative to partially socialized economies to completely discredited empirically in the years since the book was written, too, and it shows. Most jarringly for viewers even slightly familiar with corporate practices is the idea that existing, successful companies would fail due to what amounts to one of the venture capitalists that funded the start-up bowing out. Not only does that not happen, but buying into companies early and cashing out once they've succeeded is how venture capitalists make their money; what happened to Rearden is the standard procedure for people in his position and is largely thought to benefit the capitalist more than anyone else.



** Many of said men also display a very clear 1950s attitude when interacting with Alta, the one female character in the movie. One scene involves her being told to "cover herself" (since up until that point she was wearing skimpy outfits and getting the crew sexually aroused), and has JustForFun/RobbyTheRobot make her a new dress... since after all just wearing a pair of pants is ''unthinkable''.

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** Many of said men also display a very clear 1950s attitude when interacting with Alta, the one female character in the movie. One scene involves her being told to "cover herself" (since up until that point she was wearing skimpy outfits and getting the crew sexually aroused), and has JustForFun/RobbyTheRobot make her a new dress... since after all just wearing a pair of pants is ''unthinkable''.



** Short story ''Literature/DelilahAndTheSpaceRigger'' has the consternation caused by the first woman working in a space station, but one of the main characters explains its necessary for women to be part of space exploration. When the narrator says the woman should listen to what the engineer tells her because he is good at his job, she replies "I know.I trained him."

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** Short story ''Literature/DelilahAndTheSpaceRigger'' has the consternation caused by the first woman working in a space station, but one of the main characters explains its it's necessary for women to be part of space exploration. When the narrator says the woman should listen to what the engineer tells her because he is good at his job, she replies "I know.I trained him."



* ''Literature/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy'' has the people in the Golgafrincham B-Ark - the joke being that all the jobs they do are useless, 'pointless' jobs - have at least partially dated. While middle-management types and meddling marketers remain problems, people don't really look down on hairdressers as being 'pointless' any more (in the 1970s it was just beginning to become socially acceptable for a man to go to a hairdresser's instead of a barber's, but it was still seen as very weird - nowadays men go to a hairdresser's as default, and viewing a service mostly of interest to women as pointless is seen as a bit misogynistic). Then there's the 'telephone sanitisers', who have ceased to exist along with the public telephones they service.

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* ''Literature/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy'' has the people in the Golgafrincham B-Ark - -- the joke being that all the jobs they do are useless, 'pointless' jobs - -- which have at least partially dated. While middle-management types and meddling marketers remain problems, people don't really look down on hairdressers as being 'pointless' any more (in the 1970s it was just beginning to become socially acceptable for a man to go to a hairdresser's instead of a barber's, but it was still seen as very weird - -- nowadays men go to a hairdresser's as default, and viewing a service mostly of interest to women as pointless is seen as a bit misogynistic). Then there's the 'telephone sanitisers', who have ceased to exist along with the public telephones they service.



* The book ''Steampunk Prime'' has a number of late 19th and early 20th century science fiction stories that contain examples of this. "In the Deep of Time" involves a man who is cryonically revived in an advanced future... where woman STILL are expected to be subordinated to men.

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* The book ''Steampunk Prime'' has a number of late 19th and early 20th century science fiction stories that contain examples of this. "In the Deep of Time" involves a man who is cryonically revived in an advanced future... where woman STILL are expected to be subordinated subordinate to men.



** Both "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS4E2TheTenthPlanet The Tenth Planet]]" and "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS4E6TheMoonbase The Moonbase]]" show big multinational teams of scientists from all over the world, meant to show that in the future we don't discriminate. This message probably would have worked better if any of the scientists had been women. In addition, "The Tenth Planet" in particular shows the male scientists being chauvinistic towards Polly and [[StayInTheKitchen telling her to make the coffee]]. (Decades later, "[[Recap/DoctorWho2014CSLastChristmas Last Christmas]]" would poke fun at this in one scene.) Though Polly serving coffee is little more than a front; she's actually trying to get Doctor Barcley on their side so it's more of "not trying to arouse suspicion".

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** Both "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS4E2TheTenthPlanet The Tenth Planet]]" and "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS4E6TheMoonbase The Moonbase]]" show big multinational teams of scientists from all over the world, meant to show that in the future we don't discriminate. This message probably would have worked better if any of the scientists had been women. In addition, "The Tenth Planet" in particular shows the male scientists being chauvinistic towards Polly and [[StayInTheKitchen telling her to make the coffee]]. (Decades later, "[[Recap/DoctorWho2014CSLastChristmas Last Christmas]]" would poke fun at this in one scene.) Though Polly serving coffee is little more than a front; she's actually trying to get Doctor Barcley Dr Barclay on their side so it's more of "not trying to arouse suspicion".



** We never see a single Time Lady from their introduction as a race in "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS6E7TheWarGames The War Games]]" in 1969 until 1977's "The Invasion of Time" (ignoring Susan, who was a character back when the show followed [[TheArtifact different rules]] and the Doctor was still AmbiguouslyHuman). Fans at the time (and some of the actors) even thought Time Lords might have been a OneGenderRace. "The Deadly Assassin" attempted to work with this by turning it into a satire of the white-boys'-club mentality of British politics - a criticism that still has fangs decades later - but still seems short-sighted with Margaret Thatcher being Leader of the Opposition at the time. From the late 70s onwards, an implicit {{retcon}} was made that Time Lords were a post-sexist society, and the Doctor even got a Time Lady as a companion (who is sometimes shown to be baffled by human attitudes towards women). Later than that it was established that Time Lords and Time Ladies occasionally swap sex when they regenerate, and both the Capaldi-era Master and the 13th Doctor are women. This also means they have their own type of gender identity issues; a [[Recap/DoctorWhoS35E12HellBent one-off gag]] has a newly-regenerated Time Lady remark how glad she was to be back to normal after her single male regeneration.

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** We never see a single Time Lady from their introduction as a race in "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS6E7TheWarGames The War Games]]" in 1969 until 1977's "The Invasion of Time" (ignoring Susan, who was a character back when the show followed [[TheArtifact different rules]] and the Doctor was still AmbiguouslyHuman). Fans at the time (and some of the actors) even thought Time Lords might have been a OneGenderRace. "The Deadly Assassin" attempted to work with this by turning it into a satire of the white-boys'-club mentality of British politics - -- a criticism that still has fangs decades later - but still seems short-sighted with Margaret Thatcher being Leader of the Opposition at the time. From the late 70s onwards, an implicit {{retcon}} was made that Time Lords were a post-sexist society, and the Doctor even got a Time Lady as a companion (who is sometimes shown to be baffled by human attitudes towards women). Later than that it was established that Time Lords and Time Ladies occasionally swap sex when they regenerate, and both the Capaldi-era Master and the 13th Doctor are women. This also means they have their own type of gender identity issues; a [[Recap/DoctorWhoS35E12HellBent one-off gag]] has a newly-regenerated Time Lady remark how glad she was to be back to normal after her single male regeneration.


* Lampshaded at the end of the 1952 novel ''Limbo'' by Bernard Wolfe. His novel is set in a fictional post-WWIII 1990s that maintains racial segregation, sexual discrimination, and ColdWar rivalries in a world of automated factories, rocket planes and nuclear-powered artificial limbs.

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* Lampshaded at the end of the 1952 novel ''Limbo'' by Bernard Wolfe. His novel is set in a fictional post-WWIII 1990s that maintains racial segregation, sexual discrimination, and ColdWar UsefulNotes/ColdWar rivalries in a world of automated factories, rocket planes and nuclear-powered artificial limbs.

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* ''ComicBook/VForVendetta'' was first published in the 80s and depicted a dystopian future in which homosexuality was outlawed and most of Britain's LGBT people were persecuted in death camps. This kind of thing still felt plausible in the 2000s when the film adaptation was made, but in TheNewTens, acceptance for LGBT people got a massive amount of traction - making it come across as rather fantastical from a modern perspective that the public would accept such a thing.


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* ''Film/TheStepfordWives'' more blatantly so than the book it was adapted from. It was made right in the middle of the 70s during Second Wave Feminism and the divorce revolution, but set TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture (where technology allows the men of Stepford to create realistic robots). The idea that men raised in conservative families could replace their liberated feminist wives with domestic robots seemed far more plausible and horrific back then. The numerous couples with problems stay together rather than divorce because the common belief at the time was that it was better to stay in a loveless marriage than subject the children to an unpleasant divorce. That attitude had given way to more liberal views by the end of the 70s, so when the 2005 remake came along - the premise was played for comedy rather than horror.


* This was a problem to begin with for the Tomorrowland section of the Ride/DisneyThemeParks. Creator/WaltDisney himself knew from the beginning that advancing technology would sooner or later catch up to the "futuristic" theme of the park. So in 1967, he attempted to avert this by retheming it as "New Tomorrowland". But as the years go by, the park becomes more and more dated. Disney attempts to pass it off as "The tomorrow that never was and always will be." When what was then "Euro Disneyland" opened, it did away with Tomorrowland, instead using the theme of "Discoveryland" and theming it after Jules Verne's steampunk style.
* A similar problem occurred with Future World at Ride/{{Epcot}}. So in 2019, a the D23 Expo, it was announced that Future World would be done away with and separated into three different sections, World Celebration (the area around Ride/SpaceshipEarth and the plaza), World Nature (the area consisting of Ride/TheLand and Ride/TheSeasWithNemoAndFriends), and World Discovery (everything else, including Ride/TestTrack, Ride/MissionSpace, and the upcoming Ride/GuardiansOfTheGalaxyCosmicRewind).

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%%This sounds more like TechnologyMarchesOn and {{Zeerust}} as of now. Uncomment if you know otherwise and tell us how it shows social mores changing.* This was a problem to begin with for the Tomorrowland section of the Ride/DisneyThemeParks. Creator/WaltDisney himself knew from the beginning that advancing technology would sooner or later catch up to the "futuristic" theme of the park. So in 1967, he attempted to avert this by retheming it as "New Tomorrowland". But as the years go by, the park becomes more and more dated. Disney attempts to pass it off as "The tomorrow that never was and always will be." When what was then "Euro Disneyland" opened, it did away with Tomorrowland, instead using the theme of "Discoveryland" and theming it after Jules Verne's steampunk style.
%%Same here.* A similar problem occurred with Future World at Ride/{{Epcot}}. So in 2019, a the D23 Expo, it was announced that Future World would be done away with and separated into three different sections, World Celebration (the area around Ride/SpaceshipEarth and the plaza), World Nature (the area consisting of Ride/TheLand and Ride/TheSeasWithNemoAndFriends), and World Discovery (everything else, including Ride/TestTrack, Ride/MissionSpace, and the upcoming Ride/GuardiansOfTheGalaxyCosmicRewind).


* A similar problem occurred with Future World at Ride/{{EPCOT}}. So in 2019, a the D23 Expo, it was announced that Future World would be done away with and separated into three different sections, World Celebration (the area around Ride/SpaceshipEarth and the plaza), World Nature (the area consisting of Ride/TheLand and Ride/TheSeasWithNemoAndFriends), and World Discovery (everything else, including Ride/TestTrack, Ride/MissionSpace, and the upcoming Ride/GuardiansOfTheGalaxyCosmicRewind).

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* A similar problem occurred with Future World at Ride/{{EPCOT}}.Ride/{{Epcot}}. So in 2019, a the D23 Expo, it was announced that Future World would be done away with and separated into three different sections, World Celebration (the area around Ride/SpaceshipEarth and the plaza), World Nature (the area consisting of Ride/TheLand and Ride/TheSeasWithNemoAndFriends), and World Discovery (everything else, including Ride/TestTrack, Ride/MissionSpace, and the upcoming Ride/GuardiansOfTheGalaxyCosmicRewind).


* A controversial change to the Ride/PiratesOfTheCaribbean ride was the replacement of the misogynistic traits such as pirates chasing women and the auction scene. Marc Davis, one of the original designers of the ride, once pointed out that the ride was called "''Pirates'' of the Caribbean", not "''Boy Scouts'' of the Caribbean".

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* A controversial change to the Ride/PiratesOfTheCaribbean ride was the replacement of the misogynistic traits such as pirates chasing women and the auction scene. Marc Davis, X Atencio, one of the original designers of the ride, once pointed out that the ride was called "''Pirates'' of the Caribbean", not "''Boy Scouts'' of the Caribbean".

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* A controversial change to the Ride/PiratesOfTheCaribbean ride was the replacement of the misogynistic traits such as pirates chasing women and the auction scene. Marc Davis, one of the original designers of the ride, once pointed out that the ride was called "''Pirates'' of the Caribbean", not "''Boy Scouts'' of the Caribbean".

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[[folder:Theme Parks]]
* This was a problem to begin with for the Tomorrowland section of the Ride/DisneyThemeParks. Creator/WaltDisney himself knew from the beginning that advancing technology would sooner or later catch up to the "futuristic" theme of the park. So in 1967, he attempted to avert this by retheming it as "New Tomorrowland". But as the years go by, the park becomes more and more dated. Disney attempts to pass it off as "The tomorrow that never was and always will be." When what was then "Euro Disneyland" opened, it did away with Tomorrowland, instead using the theme of "Discoveryland" and theming it after Jules Verne's steampunk style.
* A similar problem occurred with Future World at Ride/{{EPCOT}}. So in 2019, a the D23 Expo, it was announced that Future World would be done away with and separated into three different sections, World Celebration (the area around Ride/SpaceshipEarth and the plaza), World Nature (the area consisting of Ride/TheLand and Ride/TheSeasWithNemoAndFriends), and World Discovery (everything else, including Ride/TestTrack, Ride/MissionSpace, and the upcoming Ride/GuardiansOfTheGalaxyCosmicRewind).
[[/folder]]

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* When Greggs is in the hospital after being shot in Season 1 of ''Series/TheWire'', her live-in girlfriend comes to the hospital. The police commissioner has come to pay a visit himself but, after the other cops [[WinkWinkNudgeNudge explain to him rather elliptically]] what that worried-looking woman's relationship to Greggs is, he can't bring himself to. In the early 2000s, when that scene was shot, that behavior was not unusual, but today, when Greggs and she could legally marry, it would be.

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* The antagonist factions in ''Literature/AtlasShrugged'' are strawmen anyway (the writer doesn't distinguish between anyone on the political spectrum who's not fully ideologically aligned with her heroes), but many of their social views, especially Balph Eubank, a popular "progressive" philosopher, espousing StayInTheKitchen, would not be tolerated in a modern left-wing organization, being rather anti-modernistic and anti-woman.


* ''ComicBook/Camelot3000'', written in the 1980s, had a [[UsefulNotes/TheApartheidEra still-segregated]] UsefulNotes/SouthAfrica in the eponymous year, far outdoing 2001. It also has Sir Tristan's angsting about being reincarnated as a woman, even though her reborn lover Isolde seems quite content to contemplate a lesbian relationship, and gender-reassignment surgery is bound to be as routine as a tummy-tuck by that era if Tristan is really not happy.

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* ''ComicBook/Camelot3000'', ''ComicBook/Camelot3000'': Despite taking place in the year 3000 - a ''millennium'' from the time this comic was written in - the 1980s, had a [[UsefulNotes/TheApartheidEra still-segregated]] UsefulNotes/SouthAfrica Soviet Union and South Africa's Apartheid are still in the eponymous year, far outdoing 2001. effect, despite both being dismantled by modern times. It also has Sir Tristan's angsting about being reincarnated as a woman, even though her reborn lover Isolde seems quite content to contemplate a lesbian relationship, and gender-reassignment sex reassignment surgery is bound to be as routine as a tummy-tuck by that era if Tristan is really not happy.


* In ''ComicBook/YTheLastMan'' after the {{Gendercide}}, the Secretary of the Interior (seventh in line) becomes the president because she's the highest ranking woman in government. This is in line with the real-life president of the day's, UsefulNotes/GeorgeWBush's cabinet in 2002 when the series started. The series follows a real-life calendar and wraps up several years later. However in 2005, Bush appointed Condoleezza Rice to Secretary of State which is third in line for succession which was then the highest rank a woman had ever been [[note]] Though Madeline Albright also served in the role during the Clinton Administration so she wasn't the first [[/note]]. By the time the series ended, Nancy Pelosi was second in line as Speaker of the House and she remains the highest ranking woman ever. Outside of America, UsefulNotes/AngelaMerkel became Chancellor of Germany in 2005 which means as of today, the second and fourth biggest economies in the world would have veteran female leaders who know the ropes and could lead without the issues the presented in the series. Israel becomes the world's superpower after the plague because at the time there was no other country with a big millitary that allowed women to serve in active combat but now the much more populous countries of India, the UK, the US, and Germany allow for women to serve in active combat. Today, the world power would likely be a Pelosi/Merkel lead coalition by economic might or India by sheer military numbers.

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* In ''ComicBook/YTheLastMan'' after the {{Gendercide}}, the Secretary of the Interior (seventh in line) becomes the president because she's the highest ranking woman in government. This is in line with the real-life president of the day's, UsefulNotes/GeorgeWBush's cabinet in 2002 when the series started. The series follows a real-life calendar and wraps up several years later. However in 2005, Bush appointed Condoleezza Rice to Secretary of State which is third in line for succession which was then the highest rank a woman had ever been [[note]] Though Madeline Albright also served in the role during the Clinton Administration so she wasn't the first [[/note]]. By the time the series ended, Nancy Pelosi was second in line as Speaker of the House and she remains the highest ranking woman ever. Outside of America, UsefulNotes/AngelaMerkel became Chancellor of Germany in 2005 which means as of today, the second and fourth biggest economies in the world would have veteran female leaders who know the ropes and could lead without the issues the presented in the series. Israel becomes the world's superpower after the plague because at the time there was no other country with a big millitary that allowed women to serve in active combat but now the much more populous countries of India, the UK, the US, and Germany allow for women to serve in active combat. Today, the world power would likely be a Pelosi/Merkel lead led coalition by economic might or India by sheer military numbers.


* In ''Manga/FruitsBasket'', Ritsu is a WholesomeCrossdresser who has quite a few jokes aimed towards him because of it, with some implications that his crossdressing is getting in the way of him becoming more confident. In the 2019 anime, these jokes are pretty much eliminated from his debut because of the growing acceptance of the transgender community and changing views of gender expression, replaced with an examination of his extreme anxiety as his real problem.
* ''Manga/BananaFish'' was originally set in New York City during TheEighties (as the manga ran from 1985 to 1994). It wouldn't get an anime adaptation until 2018, which gives it a SettingUpdate to TheNewTens, but otherwise doesn't change very much of the story. This can be jarring for viewers who are familiar with modern-day New York, which hasn't really been as dangerous and crime-ridden as it's shown in the series since TheNineties. The idea of TheMafia as all-powerful is also pretty discredited today, with most of its leaders aging, dead or in prison, and the whole apparatus severely weakened.



* The character history for the ComicBook/PostCrisis Katherine "Kate" Kane, who would become ComicBook/{{Batwoman}}, is that of a dedicated student at West Point who was expelled from the academy and forbidden to enter the army because of the "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" policy. The policy itself, which forbade any confirmed homosexuals from serving in the US military, was repealed by an act of Congress in 2011, barely a year after her origin was given in ''Detective Comics''. The story was completely accurate at the time it was written, and will have leeway for several more years because it is a flashback that occurred several years in the past, but it can no longer be brought forward to the "present" when [[ComicBookTime time "progresses"]]. Kate is actually a good example of how the DCU has already reached this in regards to gay people, since her girlfriend Maggie Sawyer was the DCU's first confirmed gay character back in 1987, and her backstory consisted off "[[{{Gayngst}} Why it sucks to be gay]]". In comparison, when we get a 4 issue flashback detailing key aspects of Kate's background we don't even get to see the "Fuck, I'm gay!" moment; at the end of one issue she's a child whose mother and sister just got killed, and at the start of the next she's enrolled in West Point sucking lips with her serious girlfriend and about to be subjected to "don't ask, don't tell", since those two aspects of her past have had much bigger impact than the whole "Liking girls"-thing.
* Creator/MarkMillar's run on ''ComicBook/TheAuthority'' ended with Apollo and Midnighter getting married. While this was considered a highly subversive act when the comic was published, gay marriage is now legal in several major countries, including the United States.



* [[ComicBook/{{Batman}} Gotham]] being a pastiche of TheBigRottenApple made sense for at least his first half century (Batman was created in 1939) but has since become dated. Both of his creators, Bob Kane and Bill Finger, grew up in poor Jewish neighborhoods in New York City during the 1920s & 30s when it was very much a WretchedHive. However since about the early '90s (when the country as a whole came out of a recession), the city has had a complete turn around economically and the crime rate has plummeted. Of course neither Kane nor Finger could have ever foreseen this nor did either live long enough to see it to come to fruition, especially Finger. Modern adaptations have come up with different ways to address it. In ''Film/BatmanBegins'' (2005), the city is dealing with the ramifications of a depression. ''Film/Joker2019'' addressed it by making the film a PeriodPiece set in 1980 when the city was in the worst part of its economic downturn.



* The film of ''Film/TheBestLittleWhorehouseInTexas'' probably seemed a bit progressive for including a black player on the victorious football team that visits the Chicken Ranch. Nowadays it looks really weird to see a team with ''only'' one such player. Further, Madame Stangley never hires girls with tattoos. Even for whores in the 70s, tattoos were considered unsightly on a woman, but that perception fell to the wayside by the 90s. The football team causes several problems. The one black football player hooks up with the one black prostitute, who isn't in the rest of the movie, because [[WhereDaWhiteWomenAt interracial]] [[BlackGalOnWhiteGuyDrama sex]] is apparently worse than prostitution. Plus, the lyrics make it clear that the team expects to "get made", that is, lose their collective virginity. The idea that college-age men on a major university's football team in the 1970s are all virgins is ludicrous; it would be far-fetched if a ''high school'' team in the ''1950s'' were ''all'' virgins.



* In ''WesternAnimation/RudolphTheRedNosedReindeer'', the squirt gun is consigned to the Island of Misfit Toys because it fires grape jelly rather than water. Today, it'd be consigned to the Island of Dangerous/Illegal Toys, because it's a squirt gun that ''looks like a real gun'', rather than having a brightly-colored tip to ensure nobody with a ''real'' weapon mistakes it for a threat.
* In the opening of ''Film/MissionImpossible'', Jim Phelps smokes a cigarette so that the people he's flying with won't notice the smell of burning film when his briefing tape self-destructs. That might make sense in the early nineties when the movie was made, but nowadays public awareness of the dangers of second-hand smoke have made commercial flights strictly no smoking. Stewardesses handing out in flight movies to passengers individually is also a thing of the past, nowadays a passenger on a flight that offers them would select something from a computer terminal built into the seat in front of them.



* In the book ''I Kissed Dating Goodbye'', Joshua Harris recommends that men and women be "friends first" before beginning to date. Back when he wrote that book in the late 90's, most couples met in real life and through platonic situations where it was highly likely that they would be friends first anyway. However, with internet dating sites being so popular nowadays and so many couples meeting through them, being friends first is not always an option.



* ''Literature/GoSetAWatchman'' features the moral that just because someone has racist beliefs doesn't mean you should have any personal animosity towards them. A decent moral for when the book was written in 1957, where many people were racist simply because they'd never been taught anything else as they were growing up, but not so much when it was finally published in 2015.



* FamilyUnfriendlyAesop aside, ''Literature/TheBerenstainBears'' story about Sister being bullied, fighting back, and merely getting what amounted to a slap on the wrist looks hilariously outdated in part because Tuffy ''and'' Sister got off ''lightly''. Many schools have adopted zero tolerance policies which state that Sister would have been in just as much trouble as Tuffy for fighting back. Additionally, Tuffy is depicted as ''throwing rocks at a baby bird''. This would today easily get Tuffy a one-way trip to the child psychologist, rather than just a probation.



* The ''Literature/TeenageWorrier'' series mentions that protagonist Letty loves football but, when she got to high school, was no longer allowed to play and was made to do netball instead - common practice in British schools when the book was published in the 1990s, but would be seen as hugely sexist and outdated today. A later re-print edition avoided this by changing it to her just being "badly discouraged" from football.



* Canadian sketch show ''Series/{{SCTV}}'' had a sketch in its very first episode, aired in 1976, where the titular station's two news anchors get into an argument on-air culminating in one accusing the other of living with a girl he isn't even married to. It's clearly meant to be scandalous. Arguably, the fact that unmarried couples living together isn't a big deal these days makes the joke even funnier.
* ''Series/CentralParkWest'':
** In the pilot episode (filmed in 1995), a character expresses surprise and elation that he was able to dump his girlfriend... by emailing her and telling her it's over. His friend (a lawyer in the District Attorney's office) chastises him for his decision, and later, the woman he dumped ridicules him in front of his co-workers for ''daring'' to be so impersonal and insensitive. The producers would have been shocked if they knew that people not only dump their partners over email in modern culture, but do it via text message as well.
** Similarly, in one ''{{Series/Seinfeld}}'' episode (also in the '90s), George and Jerry chastise Elaine for dumping her boyfriend via a phone message.
* The creators of ''Series/Daredevil2015'' ran into quite a snag when adapting the [[ComicBook/{{Daredevil}} character from the comics]]: Hell's Kitchen is simply not the WretchedHive it once was. At the time Matt Murdock was originally created, much of UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity was [[BigRottenApple run down and crime-ridden]], with Hell's Kitchen being particularly bad. However, the city has considerably gentrified since then. Not only is the modern-day Hell's Kitchen a safe neighborhood, it's become high-class and something of a {{Gayborhood}}. But since the neighborhood is so ingrained in the Daredevil mythos, moving him to, say, Newark was out of the question. It took the massive damage sustained in [[Film/TheAvengers2012 The Incident]] to justify turning it back into a gangland; this means Matt and Foggy are getting their office space for Nelson & Murdock at only 1/4th the price it would've been pre-Incident, while Wilson Fisk is building his criminal empire through bid-rigging on reconstruction.
* ''Series/IronFist2017'' faced this at a more meta level; the show received a lot of criticism from the start for the MightyWhitey premise. The basic criticism was that a white man going to Asia and becoming better at martial arts than the natives was acceptable when the comic was originally written, but now seems at least somewhat offensive.



* ''Series/AmericanGods2017'' shows us how ridiculously quick this can come. One of the Antagonists is The Technical Boy, the AnthropomorphicPersonification of the Internet. In the 1999 book he is portrayed as a pimply, overweight teenager in a Matrix-coat who tries to act a lot tougher than he is. In the 2017 series, while still fairly young, he's more of an obnoxious, Mark Zuckerberg-esque hipster douchebag who vapes in his pure white limo, and is far more violent, in representation of the overly hostile {{GIFT}}-populace and how they have led to increased real-world violence. As Gaiman put it:
--> ''"Technical Boys in 1999 were living in their moms' basements and trying to figure out how to order a pizza through the Internet. (Now) they are abusing people in the back of Ubers or monetizing fake news."''
* A 2013 episode of ''Series/MondayMornings'' had a gay man's husband and sister clashing over whether or not to sign a DNR following an accident. The man wanted to let him pass away, knowing he would not want to be kept alive by artificial means, while the sister insisted on keeping him alive. As the marriage was not legally recognized in Oregon (where the show is set), the sister was legally the next of kin and her wishes took precedence. Merely two years later, the Supreme Court legalized gay marriage in all 50 states, turning the episode into an UnintentionalPeriodPiece.
* [[SoapOpera Soaps]] get hit with this a lot. A lot of their social issue storylines that were controversial and/or groundbreaking at the time they aired now seem dated. Case in point, in 1996, ''[[Series/{{Loving}} The City]]'' was the first soap to tackle the {{transgender}} issue when a gorgeous model was revealed to have been assigned male at birth. Unfortunately, it was nixed due to negative fan reaction and the actress's poor performance. Then in 2007, ''Series/AllMyChildren'' attempted a story in which the lesbian Bianca attempted a relationship with a trans woman in the process of transitioning, which again was met with negative fan reaction. But in 2015/2016, when ''Series/TheBoldAndTheBeautiful'''s Maya was revealed to be {{transgender}}, the storyline was almost unanimously praised by viewers and critics alike, indicating the far more liberal attitudes of the viewing public.



* ''Series/MurderSheWrote'': In "Murder, She Spoke", Jessica's work recording audio versions of her novels is slated to be discontinued, because the recordings aren't drawing a profit. Why? Because ''only the blind'' were thought to be interested in buying audiobooks at the time, so the market for them is so tiny. Also a case of TechnologyMarchesOn, as before [=MP3=] players and digital distribution became ubiquitous the market for audiobooks really was a lot smaller: a portable CD player and a two-disc jewel case took up at least as much space as a paperback book, and required a couple of non-rechargeable AA batteries that were only good for a few hours.



* "Since I Met You" by DC Talk contains the line "My 200 friends couldn't fill the void in my soul". Listening to this in the 90s, this seemed like a ludicrously huge number; but since the advent of Facebook, "200 friends" is, if anything, lower than average if one has social networks in mind, and doesn't sound quite as odd thanks to such things. Though considering the large number was probably meant to reference the obvious impossibility of being close to that many people, perhaps it's a rather good (if unknowing) reference to the empty vanity of adding people merely to increase the number appearing on your profile. But in that case 200 friends still seems a bit low, unless one is using a network which limits the number of people one adds as friends, such as UsefulNotes/{{Steam}}.
* Though still catchy enough that it's seldom noticed, Music/MichaelJackson's "Billie Jean" becomes this trope if you listen to the lyrics: nowadays, the accused in a paternity suit is more likely to whine about DNA test results than about how much the baby's photo resembles him.



* The Statler Brothers' 1960s hit song, "Flowers on the Wall," had the character sarcastically talk about "Smoking cigarettes and watching ''Series/CaptainKangaroo''" as proof that he does not have nothing to do. When Franchise/TheMuppets had a viral video of their own cover of the song, obviously with that franchise's popularity with kids that line would not do with the obviously unhealthy implications of the former, and the fact that Bob Keeshan's TV show has been gone for decades. So, now Beaker occupies himself with equally pointless tasks.
* TheEighties Chilean band Music/LosPrisioneros criticized the "Chilean way of life" in various of their songs. Sadly to say, these songs are still relevant until today in Chile.



* The ''VideoGame/{{Pokemon}}'' series, starting in UsefulNotes/TheNewTens, gradually phased out its famous "Are you a boy or a girl?" prompt as transgender issues rose to public knowledge and gender became more widely thought of as a spectrum rather than a strict binary. ''VideoGame/PokemonGo'' opts for "choose your style" instead, and ''VideoGame/PokemonSunAndMoon'', ''VideoGame/PokemonLetsGoPikachuAndLetsGoEevee'' and ''VideoGame/PokemonSwordAndShield'' just ask which picture looks the most like you. ''VideoGame/PokemonMysteryDungeonRescueTeam'' ''[[UpdatedRerelease DX]]'', meanwhile, rephrases it to "Do you want to play as a boy or a girl?", simultaneously divorcing the question from the player's actual identity and accounting for dimorphism in the starter Pokémon.
* In the Wii ''VideoGame/PunchOut'', Super Macho Man taking selfies during his intermission in Title Defense in lieu of a camera crew was originally intended to show how much of a sad, fame-addicted {{narcissist}} he was, in the sense of "what kind of loser would do that?" The term "selfie" hadn't even been coined yet at the time of the game's release. Nowadays, selfies have become such a staple of the social media landscape that it no longer comes off as particularly unusual or unexpected for a celebrity to take such shots, though him using a flash camera instead of a cell phone is definitely a case of TechnologyMarchesOn.



* ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'':
** In the Season 4 (1993) episode "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS4E15ILoveLisa I Love Lisa]]"'s "Mediocre Presidents" song it is remarked that they "won't find their pictures on dollars or on cents", with the supposition being that only above average Presidents would ever be given such an honor. Fast forward 20 years, and the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Presidental_dollar Presidential Dollar Coin]] series put '''every''' US President on a dollar coin.[[note]]Even UsefulNotes/WilliamHenryHarrison, who died in 30 days![[/note]]
** In-universe example in "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS6E16BartVsAustralia Bart vs. Australia]]": when discussing the brief Australia craze in the US, a movie theater shows the marquee "Yahoo Serious Festival".
--->'''Lisa:''' I know those words, but that sign doesn't make sense.
** There are several examples in early seasons of either [[ButtMonkey Milhouse]] or [[TheSmartGuy Martin]] being implied to be gay. As sexual minorities in America grew to be more and more publicly accepted, [[QueerPeopleAreFunny that running gag]] was quietly dropped in favour of implying that Milhouse had a [[HopelessSuitor hopeless crush]] on Lisa.
*** The episode "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS8E7LisasDateWithDensity Lisa's Date With Density]]" shows Nelson beating Milhouse to the point of Milhouse being wheeled out to an ambulance, when Nelson thinks a note (from Lisa) was from Milhouse. Even back then it was questionable as a gag, especially since Nelson receives no punishment whatsoever. Nowadays, it's a poster symbol of [[UnfortunateImplications gay-bashing]] (Matthew Sheperd's death took place only two years after this episode aired).
** In "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS5E14LisaVsMalibuStacy Lisa vs. Malibu Stacy]]", Bart complains that Lisa’s over-the-top liberal activism has forced the family into such indignities as marching in a gay pride parade. These days, participating in Pride would hardly be considered on the extreme end of progressivism. Indeed, episodes in the 2000s show the family (including Bart) happily attending uncontroversial Pride events along with the rest of Springfield.
* The ''WesternAnimation/{{Animaniacs}}'' episode "Rest in Pieces" had an important plot point being that no one ever dies in a cartoon. ([[TakeThat Except maybe]] WesternAnimation/{{Bonkers}}.) Slappy Squirrel's statement about death's nonexistence has ''never'' been entirely accurate, but it's more blatantly wrong now than it was then; at the time, death was a frequent topic in anime, but anime hadn't really taken off in the west and death was uncommon in western cartoons. The topic has since started to come up more frequently, thanks to changing cultural standards and [[MediaWatchdog censors]] lightening up somewhat, and so that claim now sounds rather strange - at best, it sounds like a reference to older cartoons rather than a statement about ''all'' cartoons. Even the [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation Golden Age]] cartoons Slappy was likely thinking of sometimes contained death, but the ones which did generally either faded into obscurity or were [[BannedEpisode banned]].
* Though it aired in the early '90s, some episodes of ''WesternAnimation/{{Doug}}'' could bring several questions to youths who saw the show today. "Doug Didn't Do It" would be one example of these:
** First, since schools would often have closed-circuit television, Bone could have just looked into the system to find the suspects he needs to know who took his trophy. Better yet, as many youths of today criticized this (on-campus CCTV) as a form of oppression, Doug could have used this against Bone to clear his name.
** Second, since his trophy was grounds for "probable cause",[[note]]Reasonable grounds for belief that an accused person may be subject to arrest or the issuance of a warrant.[[/note]] Bone could've just searched through lockers, either everyone's or just the "suspects".
** Third, both Doug and Roger would've faced probable expulsion for what happened, even if Principal Buttsavitch overturned the decision on the former.
* ''WesternAnimation/MissionHill'' features an episode where the main character, Andy, needs to find a job. He spends a day looking for work, stumbling into ''five'' jobs, then quitting all of them for no reason other than he didn't like them, and still ended up making $60. To anyone in the job market ''today'', the idea of finding five jobs just walking down the street is a total fantasy.
* ''WesternAnimation/{{Recess}}'' has an episode wherein Gus is being bullied and fights back, which causes the bully to ''back down'' but not after he gets a beatdown himself, and nobody gets punished for it. In the new tens with zero tolerance policies becoming standard, ''both'' Gus ''and'' the bully would have been on a one-way trip to Principal Prickley's office to get expelled. To be fair it's established that Gus won't tell a teacher because kids don't believe in snitching, which is still a common attitude among gradeschoolers even today, and there's no teachers or other staff around to witness the incident (even when bullying policies were more lax it still wasn't permitted and there would have been '''some''' punishment especially given the rather savage extent of the beating) and so the only adults aware would be Gus's parents, who may believe standing up to bullies is the best solution, which would fit the attitude of a career military man like Mr. Griswold. There's also no way Gus could be expelled, since he didn't hit Gelman back and if he did it would have been ruled self defense since Gelman clearly wasn't going to let him simply walk away. If anything Gus's parents could have a potential lawsuit against the school since it occurred on school property and the playground was unsupervised despite the large amount of kids still on it.
* ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' has been on so long that the earlier seasons have started to get this compared to the more recent ones. To be specific, the early seasons heavily implied that SchoolBullyingIsHarmless, with any characters who complain being considered wusses who deserve their poor treatment. After certain horrific instances of classroom bullying forced society to reevaluate this perception, the show seems to have followed suit, with later episodes cutting back on this significantly (at least by the sympathetic characters) with a couple episodes explicitly saying that [[MemeticMutation bullying's bad, m'kay?]]
** The episode "[[Recap/SouthParkS9E1MrGarrisonsFancyNewVagina Mr Garrison's Fancy New Vagina]]" mocks transgender identities, comparing it to a human wanting to become a dolphin (though the mockery could be aimed at doctors who prey on insecurities of potential patients for profit.) By "[[Recap/SouthParkS18E3TheCissy The Cissy]]", nearly a decade later, trans identities have become far more normalized, and the joke is instead about faking transexuality to scam people too socially (or, in this specific case, legally) conscious to do anything about it.
** "[[Recap/SouthParkS10E6ManBearPig ManBearPig]]" is a jab at the frequently-apocalyptic predictions made in the mid-2000s of a future with uncontrolled climate change, and features Al Gore as a madman who ruins people's lives in an attempt to warn everyone about the nonexistent "Manbearpig" (an obvious allegory for climate change). Over the next decade, uncontrolled global warming did lead to increasingly extreme events, such as massive wildlifes, hurricanes, heatwaves, and the devastation of whole ecosystems, making the episode look rather ignorant and outdated. Parker and Stone responded with "Recap/SouthParkS22E6TimeToGetCereal", which not only shows Manbearpig to be RealAfterAll, but also has the main characters sincerely apologizing to Gore. Manbearpig itself is shown to be a demon released from hell by Stan's grandpa, an obvious jab at the numerous ways Boomer-era politicians denied climate change and pushed for changes that ultimately increased its severity.
* ''WesternAnimation/{{Arthur}}'' has several earlier episodes that passed into this, which is inevitable given the LongRunner status of the show. An example would be the season 1 episode "Arthur and the Crunch Cereal Contest" in the US and Canada, which had a gag that the protagonist can only participate in the titular contest if he submits a box top of said cereal as a proof of purchase, prompting Arthur to munch on said cereal throughout the episode. New consumer laws introduced around and after the turn of the millennium prohibits making the participant buy a product to enter a contest as it constitutes to a form of advertising. If Crunch Cereal were to try that shtick again in TheNewTens, they'd be facing a hefty fine from the FTC, and the contest forcefully cancelled.
** In the second season episode "Arthur Makes A Movie", Arthur is banned from seeing a movie by his parents because it has a PG-13 rating, even though Buster is allowed to see it. This might have made sense when the episode aired, since at the time PG-13 ratings were typically used for movies aimed at adults (it's worth noting that the movie Arthur wanted to see was a Franchise/JamesBond parody). Nowadays, though, most PG-13 movies are aimed at family audiences, so the notion of an 8-year-old not being allowed to see one is laughable.
* The anti-drug special ''WesternAnimation/CartoonAllStarsToTheRescue'' had [[Franchise/AlvinAndTheChipmunks Simon Seville]] refer to marijuana as an unlawful substance. Depending on where you live, marijuana has been legalized or in the process of decriminalization for medical use. Canada in particular, being one of the countries the special aired in, has legalized marijuana nationwide for medical or recreational use in 2018. WebVideo/{{Phelous}} jokingly lampshaded this during his review of the special.
* This trope is why original character Mark Beaks exists in the ''WesternAnimation/Ducktales2017'' reboot: both the comics and the original cartoon predate the internet and modern technology that created many modern day billionaires, which Beaks is a generalized parody of.
** Another example is how the reboot ended up restoring [[spoiler:Glomgold's South African nationality from the original comics. When the previous show aired in 1987, TheApartheidEra was in full swing prompting the showrunners to avoid the association by making Glomgold a Scot like Scrooge. Since Apartheid ended in 1993, Glomgold being South African is no longer controversial in 2018]].

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