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**Short story ''Literature/DelilahandtheSpaceRigger'' has the consternation caused by the first woman working in a space station, but one of the main characters explains its necessary for women to be part of space exploration. When the narrator says the woman should listen to what the engineer tells her because he is good at his job, she replies "I know.I trained him."


* An in-universe example in the short story "Literature/TomorrowTown": the 1970s-1980s protagonist is sent to investigate a murder within a utopian bubble-society. He notices the prevalence of somewhat old-fashioned gender roles, and figures it is due to the society having been founded and sealed off from the rest of the world in the mid-1950s, when such gender roles were more common.

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* An in-universe example in the short story "Literature/TomorrowTown": the 1970s-1980s 1970s protagonist is sent to investigate a murder within a utopian bubble-society. He notices the prevalence of somewhat old-fashioned gender roles, and figures it is due to the society having been being founded and sealed off from the rest of the world in the mid-1950s, when such gender roles were more common. by a Golden Age science fiction writer who imposed his own 1950s social mores on his supposedly futuristic society.


* In ''Manga/FruitsBasket'', Ritsu is a WholesomeCrossdresser that has quite a few jokes towards him because of it. In the 2019 anime, these jokes are pretty much eliminated from his debut because of the growing acceptance of transgender and ace communities, replaced with an examination of his extreme anxiety as his real problem.

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* In ''Manga/FruitsBasket'', Ritsu is a WholesomeCrossdresser that who has quite a few jokes aimed towards him because of it. it, with some implications that his crossdressing is getting in the way of him becoming more confident. In the 2019 anime, these jokes are pretty much eliminated from his debut because of the growing acceptance of the transgender community and ace communities, changing views of gender expression, replaced with an examination of his extreme anxiety as his real problem.

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* In ''Manga/FruitsBasket'', Ritsu is a WholesomeCrossdresser that has quite a few jokes towards him because of it. In the 2019 anime, these jokes are pretty much eliminated from his debut because of the growing acceptance of transgender and ace communities, replaced with an examination of his extreme anxiety as his real problem.


* ''Film/TheWarriors'' (1979), based on a book from the mid-1960s, is supposed to take place "sometime in the future" (as the opening of Creator/WalterHill's "director's cut" makes clear), but even leaving aside the film's TotallyRadical fashions, hairstyles, and slang, there are a number of other elements that now strike us as Zeerusty. Most prominent is Cyrus's claim that a citywide gang could control everything and thwart the NYPD... when, just a few years after this film's release, the LAPD began to employ military technology in their fight against street gangs. There's also the failure of any character to suspect that a woman sitting alone on a park bench very late at night might be a plainclothes police officer.[[note]]Which is especially stupid of them because they are themselves examples of dangerous gang members in a park, and one of them is [[SociopathicHero a potential if not actual rapist]].[[/note]]

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* ''Film/TheWarriors'' (1979), based on a book from the mid-1960s, is supposed to take place "sometime in the future" (as the opening of Creator/WalterHill's "director's cut" makes clear), but even leaving aside the film's TotallyRadical fashions, hairstyles, and slang, there are a number of other elements that now strike us as Zeerusty. Most prominent is Cyrus's claim that a citywide gang could control everything and thwart the NYPD... when, just a few years after this film's release, the LAPD began to employ military technology in their fight against street gangs. There's also the failure of any character to suspect that a woman sitting alone on a park bench very late at night might be a plainclothes police officer.[[note]]Which is especially stupid of them because they are themselves examples of dangerous gang members in a park, and one of them is [[SociopathicHero [[VillainProtagonist a potential if not actual rapist]].[[/note]]



** On another note, the franchise's depiction of Earth as a OneWorldOrder is becoming less and less likely given both deteriorating international and [[BalkanizeMe intranational]] relations, as well as the renewed focus ([[Administrivia/RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment for good or ill]]) on racial and/or ethnic identity in the developed world. Many on both the political left and right today would balk (for very different reasons) at the sheer amount of cultural erasure needed to make such an arrangement even remotely feasible. This was something even the writers themselves could see was problematic as early as ''TNG'', with the Borg being partly written as a grim parody of the Federation's assimilationist values taken to their logical conclusion.

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** On another note, the franchise's depiction of Earth as a OneWorldOrder is becoming less and less likely given both deteriorating deteriorating/fluctuating international and [[BalkanizeMe intranational]] relations, as well as the renewed focus ([[Administrivia/RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment for good or ill]]) on racial and/or ethnic identity in the developed world. Many on both the political left and right today would balk (for very different reasons) at the sheer amount of cultural erasure needed to make such an arrangement even remotely feasible. This was something even the writers themselves could see was problematic as early as ''TNG'', with the Borg being partly written as a grim parody of the Federation's assimilationist values taken to their logical conclusion.



** The Doctor telling Susan "remember the Red Indian!" in "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS1E1AnUnearthlyChild An Unearthly Child]]" - not only is this racist nowadays, it doesn't make any sense for the Doctor to hold these views. While the show had not yet decided for certain that he was an alien, he was at the very least from the distant future.[[labelnote: *]]Perhaps the TARDIS's TranslatorMicrobes converted his actual phrase to the term Ian and Barbara - and the audience of the time - were familiar with?[[/labelnote]]

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** The Doctor telling Susan "remember "Remember the Red Indian!" in "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS1E1AnUnearthlyChild An Unearthly Child]]" - not only is this racist nowadays, it doesn't make any sense for the Doctor to hold these views. While the show had not yet decided for certain that he was an alien, he was at the very least from the distant future.[[labelnote: *]]Perhaps the TARDIS's TranslatorMicrobes converted his actual phrase to the term Ian and Barbara - and the audience of the time - were familiar with?[[/labelnote]]


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* While the vast majority of ''Machinima/RedVsBlue'' has aged rather well, many jokes/aspects of the earlier seasons definitely wouldn't fly if they had came out today and not in the [=2000s=] and early [=2010s=]. ''[[Machinima/RedVsBlueTheBloodGulchChronicles The Blood Gulch Chronicles]]'' probably gets this the worst, as the various examples of InnocentlyInsensitive UnfortunateImplications during its events[[note]]I.e., the usage of "retard" (which is now seen as an offensive slur against the mentally disabled) in casual parlance, the uncomfortably common homophobia and misogyny displayed in jokes from as "recent" as ''[[Machinima/RedVsBlueTheRecollection Recreation]]'', Sister being written only as a "loud slut" until ''The Shisno Paradox'', and Donut's entire character being pretty much one big Gay Panic joke until (arguably) ''[[Machinima/RedVsBlueTheProjectFreelancerSaga The Project Freelancer Saga]]''[[/note]] would '''all''' have gotten a noticeable backlash if they were to have been first released in 2019. [[AuthorsSavingThrow Though to]] Creator/{{Rooster Teeth}}'s credit, the series ''has'' actually adapted relatively well to the times by taking these criticisms into account, with it in turn focusing on having more politically correct humor as the series has gone on while either removing the series' more problematic elements or giving them a suitable {{Revision}}[=/=]{{Rewrite}}[[note]]I.e., Church and Tex's StarCrossedLovers status[=/=]BelligerentSexualTension from during ''The Blood Gulch Chronicles'' is re-framed in ''The Project Freelancer Saga'' as the genuinely toxic and mutually destructive romance it really is, Tucker gets called out on his increasingly {{Jerkass}} behavior and toxic masculinity by Kaikaina during ''The Shisno Paradox'' (with him even eventually [[TookALevelInKindness taking a noticeable level in kindness during the events of]] ''Singularity''), and Donut's AmbiguouslyGay characteristics get increasingly downplayed with more focus given instead to his status as TheDitz of Red Team along with his NaiveNewcomer and GranolaGirl qualities[[/note]].
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* This trope is why original character Mark Beaks exists in the ''WesternAnimation/Ducktales2017'' reboot: both the comics and the original cartoon predate the internet and modern technology that created many modern day billionaires, which Beaks is a generalized parody of.


** The series appears to have done away with the blatant white supremacy in Gilead as described in the novel. Not only did they want babies, the goal was ''white'' babies, with black people being "removed to North Dakota" (quite possibly [[ReleasedToElsewhere getting killed there]]). In the novel, [[RaceLift Moira was white]], while African-American actress Samira Wiley plays her in the series. We see some photos of black Commanders and Wives in the clinic. No one thinks anything is odd when Moira impersonates an Aunt, either. There are some black men among the Guardians and common workers too.
** The series also so far removes the criticism of radical feminists present in the original book. In the book, Offred's mother was a radical second-wave feminist who believed that all men were sexist and that pornography should be banned. In the feminist community there was fierce debate about that point of view, however nowadays it's more of a fringe belief. Additionally, since the series received a SettingUpdate to the 21st century, it wouldn't make sense temporally for Offred's mother to be a second-wave feminist (since the second wave started in the 60s, and at this point Offred's mother could've been ''born'' in the early 60s). When she's finally introduced in season 2, she is a feminist (who takes Offred to feminist rallies as a child), but not an extremist like her book counterpart.

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** The series appears to have done away with the blatant white supremacy in Gilead as described in the novel. Not only did they want babies, the goal was ''white'' babies, with black people being "removed to North Dakota" (quite possibly [[ReleasedToElsewhere getting killed there]]). In the novel, [[RaceLift Moira was white]], while African-American actress Samira Wiley plays her in the series. We see some photos of black Commanders and Wives in the clinic. No one thinks anything is odd when Moira impersonates an Aunt, either. There are some black men among the Guardians and common workers too. \n There are some Commanders and Wives who do explicitly want white babies (Aunt Lydia mentions a couple who explicitly requested not to have a Handmaid of color) but it's less institutionalized than in the novel.
** The series also so far removes the criticism of radical feminists present in the original book. In the book, Offred's mother was a radical second-wave feminist who believed that all men were sexist and that pornography should be banned. In the feminist community there was fierce debate about that point of view, however nowadays it's more of a fringe belief. Additionally, since the series received a SettingUpdate to the 21st century, it wouldn't make sense temporally for Offred's mother to be a second-wave feminist (since the second wave started in the 60s, and at this point Offred's mother could've been ''born'' in the early 60s).60s[[note]]Her actress, Creator/CherryJones, was born in 1956.[[/note]]). When she's finally introduced in season 2, she is a feminist (who takes Offred to feminist rallies as a child), but not an extremist like her book counterpart.

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* ''Series/MurderSheWrote'': In "Murder, She Spoke", Jessica's work recording audio versions of her novels is slated to be discontinued, because the recordings aren't drawing a profit. Why? Because ''only the blind'' were thought to be interested in buying audiobooks at the time, so the market for them is so tiny.


* The ''WesternAnimation/{{Animaniacs}}'' episode "Rest in Pieces" had an important plot point being that no one ever dies in a cartoon. ([[TakeThat Except maybe]] WesternAnimation/{{Bonkers}}.) Slappy Squirrel's statement about death's nonexistence has ''never'' been entirely accurate, but it's more blatantly wrong now than it was then; at the time, death was a frequent topic in anime, but anime hadn't really taken off in the west and death was uncommon in western cartoons. Even the [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation Golden Age]] cartoons Slappy was likely thinking of sometimes contained death, but the ones which did generally either faded into obscurity or were [[BannedEpisode banned]].

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* The ''WesternAnimation/{{Animaniacs}}'' episode "Rest in Pieces" had an important plot point being that no one ever dies in a cartoon. ([[TakeThat Except maybe]] WesternAnimation/{{Bonkers}}.) Slappy Squirrel's statement about death's nonexistence has ''never'' been entirely accurate, but it's more blatantly wrong now than it was then; at the time, death was a frequent topic in anime, but anime hadn't really taken off in the west and death was uncommon in western cartoons. The topic has since started to come up more frequently, thanks to changing cultural standards and [[MediaWatchdog censors]] lightening up somewhat, and so that claim now sounds rather strange - at best, it sounds like a reference to older cartoons rather than a statement about ''all'' cartoons. Even the [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation Golden Age]] cartoons Slappy was likely thinking of sometimes contained death, but the ones which did generally either faded into obscurity or were [[BannedEpisode banned]].


* The ''WesternAnimation/{{Animaniacs}}'' episode "Rest in Pieces" had an important plot point being that no one ever dies in a cartoon. ([[TakeThat Except maybe]] WesternAnimation/{{Bonkers}}.) Slappy Squirrel's statement has ''never'' been entirely accurate, but it's more blatantly wrong now than it was then; at the time, death was a frequent topic in anime, but anime hadn't really taken off in the west and death was uncommon in western cartoons. Even the [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation Golden Age]] cartoons Slappy was likely thinking of sometimes contained death, but the ones which did generally either faded into obscurity or were [[BannedEpisode banned]].

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* The ''WesternAnimation/{{Animaniacs}}'' episode "Rest in Pieces" had an important plot point being that no one ever dies in a cartoon. ([[TakeThat Except maybe]] WesternAnimation/{{Bonkers}}.) Slappy Squirrel's statement about death's nonexistence has ''never'' been entirely accurate, but it's more blatantly wrong now than it was then; at the time, death was a frequent topic in anime, but anime hadn't really taken off in the west and death was uncommon in western cartoons. Even the [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation Golden Age]] cartoons Slappy was likely thinking of sometimes contained death, but the ones which did generally either faded into obscurity or were [[BannedEpisode banned]].


* The Statler Brothers' 1960s hit song, "Flowers on the Wall," had the character sarcastically talk about "Smoking cigarettes and watching ''Series/CaptainKangaroo''" as proof that he does not have nothing to do. When Franchise/TheMuppets had a ViralVideo of their own cover of the song, obviously with that franchise's popularity with kids that line would not do with the obviously unhealthy implications of the former, and the fact that Bob Keeshan's TV show has been gone for decades. So, now Beaker occupies himself with equally pointless tasks.

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* The Statler Brothers' 1960s hit song, "Flowers on the Wall," had the character sarcastically talk about "Smoking cigarettes and watching ''Series/CaptainKangaroo''" as proof that he does not have nothing to do. When Franchise/TheMuppets had a ViralVideo viral video of their own cover of the song, obviously with that franchise's popularity with kids that line would not do with the obviously unhealthy implications of the former, and the fact that Bob Keeshan's TV show has been gone for decades. So, now Beaker occupies himself with equally pointless tasks.



* The ''VideoGame/{{Pokemon}}'' series, starting in UsefulNotes/TheNewTens, gradually phased out its famous "Are you a boy or a girl?" prompt as the transgender identity rose to public knowledge and gender became more of a spectrum rather than a strict binary. ''VideoGame/PokemonGo'' opts for "choose your style" instead, and ''VideoGame/PokemonSunAndMoon'' and ''VideoGame/PokemonLetsGoPikachuAndLetsGoEevee'' just ask which picture looks the most like you.

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* The ''VideoGame/{{Pokemon}}'' series, starting in UsefulNotes/TheNewTens, gradually phased out its famous "Are you a boy or a girl?" prompt as the transgender identity issues rose to public knowledge and gender became more widely thought of as a spectrum rather than a strict binary. ''VideoGame/PokemonGo'' opts for "choose your style" instead, and ''VideoGame/PokemonSunAndMoon'' and ''VideoGame/PokemonLetsGoPikachuAndLetsGoEevee'' just ask which picture looks the most like you.



** There are several examples in early seasons of either [[ButtMonkey Milhouse]] or [[TheSmartGuy Martin]] being implied to be gay. As sexual minorities in America grew to be more and more publicly accepted, that running gag was quietly dropped in favour of implying that Milhouse had a [[HopelessSuitor hopeless crush]] on Lisa.

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** There are several examples in early seasons of either [[ButtMonkey Milhouse]] or [[TheSmartGuy Martin]] being implied to be gay. As sexual minorities in America grew to be more and more publicly accepted, [[QueerPeopleAreFunny that running gag gag]] was quietly dropped in favour of implying that Milhouse had a [[HopelessSuitor hopeless crush]] on Lisa.



* The ''WesternAnimation/{{Animaniacs}}'' episode "Rest in Pieces" had an important plot point being that no one ever dies in a cartoon. ([[TakeThat Except maybe]] WesternAnimation/{{Bonkers}}.) On the other hand, death has been a recurring and frequent topic in anime even at that time, but this was also before anime really took off in the west. In any case, by the turn of the millennium, Slappy Squirrel's statement about the nonexistence of death in cartoons feels more like a quaint throwback to UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation than any accurate statement about cartoons.
** It also contradicts actual depictions of death in Golden Age Cartoons. For example, ''WesternAnimation/BugsBunnyNipsTheNips'' (1944) involves Bugs Bunny systematically exterminating a unit of Japanese soldiers, ''Disney/EducationForDeath'' (1943) ends with the protagonist dead and buried (among many other soldiers), and ''Disney/ChickenLittle'' (1943) has Foxy Loxy lure all the poultry to his den, using the protagonist as bait, and eating them all and placing their bones as gravestones.

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* The ''WesternAnimation/{{Animaniacs}}'' episode "Rest in Pieces" had an important plot point being that no one ever dies in a cartoon. ([[TakeThat Except maybe]] WesternAnimation/{{Bonkers}}.) On the other hand, death has been a recurring and frequent topic in anime even at that time, but this was also before anime really took off in the west. In any case, by the turn of the millennium, Slappy Squirrel's statement about has ''never'' been entirely accurate, but it's more blatantly wrong now than it was then; at the nonexistence of time, death was a frequent topic in anime, but anime hadn't really taken off in the west and death was uncommon in western cartoons. Even the [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation Golden Age]] cartoons feels more like a quaint throwback to UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation than any accurate statement about cartoons.
** It also contradicts actual depictions
Slappy was likely thinking of death in Golden Age Cartoons. For example, ''WesternAnimation/BugsBunnyNipsTheNips'' (1944) involves Bugs Bunny systematically exterminating a unit of Japanese soldiers, ''Disney/EducationForDeath'' (1943) ends with sometimes contained death, but the protagonist dead and buried (among many other soldiers), and ''Disney/ChickenLittle'' (1943) has Foxy Loxy lure all the poultry to his den, using the protagonist as bait, and eating them all and placing their bones as gravestones.ones which did generally either faded into obscurity or were [[BannedEpisode banned]].


** Heinlein's short story ''Literature/AllYouZombies'' features a sex-segregated future in which astronauts and space pilots are always male, and the spaceship stewardess/prostitutes in skimpy outfits are all female. Written not long after WWII, the story fails to anticipate that the horrifying events of that war would lead to very strict legislation about medical procedures and informed consent. His central character is placed under general anesthesia -- and wakes to be informed, ''after the fact'', that s/he has been subjected without consent to sex reassignment surgery. In our world such a character would not be relegated to a hand-to-mouth living writing confession stories, because he would sue the hospital and doctor into bankruptcy.

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** Heinlein's short story ''Literature/AllYouZombies'' features a sex-segregated future in which astronauts and space pilots are always male, and the spaceship stewardess/prostitutes in skimpy outfits are all female. Written not long after WWII, the story fails to anticipate that the horrifying events of that war would lead to very strict legislation about medical procedures and informed consent. His central character is placed under general anesthesia -- and wakes to be informed, ''after the fact'', that s/he has they have been subjected without consent to sex reassignment surgery. In our world such a character would not be relegated to a hand-to-mouth living writing confession stories, because he they would sue the hospital and doctor into bankruptcy.



** Both "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS4E2TheTenthPlanet The Tenth Planet]]" and "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS4E6TheMoonbase The Moonbase]]" show big multinational teams of scientists from all over the world, meant to show that in the future we don't discriminate. This message probably would have worked better if any of the scientists had been women. In addition, "The Tenth Planet" in particular shows the male scientists being chauvinistic towards Polly and [[StayInTheKitchen telling her to make the coffee]]. (Decades later, "[[Recap/DoctorWho2014CSLastChristmas Last Christmas]]" would poke fun at this in one scene.)
*** Though in fact, Polly serving coffee is little more than afront, she's actually trying to get Doctor Barcley on their side so it's more of "not trying to arouse suspicion"

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** Both "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS4E2TheTenthPlanet The Tenth Planet]]" and "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS4E6TheMoonbase The Moonbase]]" show big multinational teams of scientists from all over the world, meant to show that in the future we don't discriminate. This message probably would have worked better if any of the scientists had been women. In addition, "The Tenth Planet" in particular shows the male scientists being chauvinistic towards Polly and [[StayInTheKitchen telling her to make the coffee]]. (Decades later, "[[Recap/DoctorWho2014CSLastChristmas Last Christmas]]" would poke fun at this in one scene.)
***
) Though in fact, Polly serving coffee is little more than afront, a front; she's actually trying to get Doctor Barcley on their side so it's more of "not trying to arouse suspicion"suspicion".



* "Since I Met You" by DC Talk contains the line "My 200 friends couldn't fill the void in my soul". Listening to this in the 90s, this seemed like a ludicrously huge number; but since the advent of Facebook, "200 friends" is, if anything, lower than average. Though considering the large number was probably meant to reference the obvious impossibility of being close to that many people, perhaps it's a rather good (if unknowing) reference to the empty vanity of adding people merely to increase the number appearing on your profile. But in that case 200 friends still seems a bit low.

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* "Since I Met You" by DC Talk contains the line "My 200 friends couldn't fill the void in my soul". Listening to this in the 90s, this seemed like a ludicrously huge number; but since the advent of Facebook, "200 friends" is, if anything, lower than average.average if one has social networks in mind, and doesn't sound quite as odd thanks to such things. Though considering the large number was probably meant to reference the obvious impossibility of being close to that many people, perhaps it's a rather good (if unknowing) reference to the empty vanity of adding people merely to increase the number appearing on your profile. But in that case 200 friends still seems a bit low.low, unless one is using a network which limits the number of people one adds as friends, such as UsefulNotes/{{Steam}}.


* The film of ''Film/TheBestLittleWhorehouseInTexas'' probably seemed a bit progressive for including a black player on the victorious football team that visits the Chicken Ranch. Nowadays it looks really weird to see a team with ''only'' one such player. Further, Madame Stangley never hires girls with tattoos. Even for whores in the 70's, tattoos were considered unsightly on a woman, but that perception fell to the wayside by the 90's.
** The football team causes several problems. The one black football player hooks up with the one black prostitute, who isn't in the rest of the movie, because [[WhereDaWhiteWomenAt interracial]] [[BlackGalOnWhiteGuyDrama sex]] is apparently worse than prostitution. Plus, the lyrics make it clear that the team expects to "get made", that is, lose their collective virginity. The idea that college-age men on a major university's football team in the 1970s are all virgins is ludicrous; it would be far-fetched if a ''high school'' team in the ''1950s'' were ''all'' virgins.

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* The film of ''Film/TheBestLittleWhorehouseInTexas'' probably seemed a bit progressive for including a black player on the victorious football team that visits the Chicken Ranch. Nowadays it looks really weird to see a team with ''only'' one such player. Further, Madame Stangley never hires girls with tattoos. Even for whores in the 70's, 70s, tattoos were considered unsightly on a woman, but that perception fell to the wayside by the 90's.
**
90s. The football team causes several problems. The one black football player hooks up with the one black prostitute, who isn't in the rest of the movie, because [[WhereDaWhiteWomenAt interracial]] [[BlackGalOnWhiteGuyDrama sex]] is apparently worse than prostitution. Plus, the lyrics make it clear that the team expects to "get made", that is, lose their collective virginity. The idea that college-age men on a major university's football team in the 1970s are all virgins is ludicrous; it would be far-fetched if a ''high school'' team in the ''1950s'' were ''all'' virgins.



** Many of said men also display a very clear 1950s attitude when interacting with the one female character in the movie. One scene involves her being told to "cover herself" (since up until that point she was wearing skimpy outfits and getting the crew sexually aroused), and has Robby the Robot make her a new dress... since after all just wearing a pair of pants is ''unthinkable''.
* George Pal's 1955 film ''Conquest of Space'' made some interesting technological predictions, including a concept for a spaceship with principles vaguely reminiscent of the space shuttle. There is even a bit of FairForItsDay in that there is ''some'' racial equality so far as the one Japanese crew member being treated with respect by the otherwise white cast. What the film got wrong was assuming the U.S. space program would still be run by the military.[[note]]Initially experiments in rocketry were conducted by both the army and the navy. The problem (which the filmmakers were probably not aware of in 1955) was that both were wasting money and resources competing against each other and refusing to share. The government eventually got fed up with it and instead put together the civilian organization of NASA.[[/note]] Also women StayInTheKitchen back on Earth while the men are the ones who get to go into space. In other words, according to this film, female astronauts don't exist, which may be especially jarring to a modern viewer in light of [[Film/{{Gravity}} a certain more recent critically acclaimed film centered around a female astronaut]].
** In addition, the Captain of the ship comes to think of the mission as sacrilegious, with Mankind's presence in God's perfect heavens being an insult to the almighty. This was actually a real movement that flourished very briefly when the idea of space travel was first mooted as a serious possibility. By the time the movie came out the philosophy was rapidly dying out, and the launch of Sputnik a couple of years later washed the remnants away completely. To modern audiences it just looks like a delusional symptom of the man going insane.

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** Many of said men also display a very clear 1950s attitude when interacting with Alta, the one female character in the movie. One scene involves her being told to "cover herself" (since up until that point she was wearing skimpy outfits and getting the crew sexually aroused), and has Robby the Robot JustForFun/RobbyTheRobot make her a new dress... since after all just wearing a pair of pants is ''unthinkable''.
* George Pal's 1955 film ''Conquest of Space'' made some interesting technological predictions, including a concept for a spaceship with principles vaguely reminiscent of the space shuttle. There is even a bit of FairForItsDay in that there is ''some'' racial equality so far as the one Japanese crew member being treated with respect by the otherwise white cast. What the film got wrong was assuming the U.S. space program would still be run by the military.[[note]]Initially experiments in rocketry were conducted by both the army and the navy. The problem (which the filmmakers were probably not aware of in 1955) was that both were wasting money and resources competing against each other and refusing to share. The government eventually got fed up with it and instead put together the civilian organization of NASA.[[/note]] Also women StayInTheKitchen back on Earth while the men are the ones who get to go into space. In other words, according to this film, female astronauts don't exist, which may be especially jarring to a modern viewer in light of [[Film/{{Gravity}} a certain more recent critically acclaimed film centered around a female astronaut]].
**
astronaut]]. In addition, the Captain of the ship comes to think of the mission as sacrilegious, with Mankind's presence in God's perfect heavens being an insult to the almighty. This was actually a real movement that flourished very briefly when the idea of space travel was first mooted as a serious possibility. By the time the movie came out the philosophy was rapidly dying out, and the launch of Sputnik a couple of years later washed the remnants away completely. To modern audiences it just looks like a delusional symptom of the man going insane.



* A source of humor in ''Film/TheFinalGirls'' comes from the differences between the main characters and the 80's campers they find inside the movie. Particularly, the treatment of LGBT people (Chris, who [[HasTwoMommies was raised by a gay couple]] gets easily mad at one of the campers making homophobic comments) and technology (Vicki trying to explain to another camper how smartphones work).

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* A source of humor in ''Film/TheFinalGirls'' comes from the differences between the main characters and the 80's 80s campers they find inside the movie. Particularly, the treatment of LGBT people (Chris, who [[HasTwoMommies was raised by a gay couple]] gets easily mad at one of the campers making homophobic comments) and technology (Vicki trying to explain to another camper how smartphones work).



* Creator/ArthurCClarke's ''Space Odyssey'' was pretty hilarious in this regard; along with [[TheGreatPoliticsMessUp the Soviet Union lasting well into the 2000s]], Apartheid in South Africa continued into the 2030s, when it ended in a revolution that kicked the white ruling class out.
** Apartheid-related predictions were often a bit off in this way, due mostly to outsiders imagining some sort of centuries-long, deep-seated race war, whereas it was a recent and quickly dated policy which was mostly prolonged because it somehow wound up as a part of Cold War politics. As soon as the policy was put up to a vote, it was rejected by overwhelming numbers.

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* Creator/ArthurCClarke's ''Space Odyssey'' was pretty hilarious in this regard; along with [[TheGreatPoliticsMessUp the Soviet Union lasting well into the 2000s]], Apartheid in South Africa continued into the 2030s, when it ended in a revolution that kicked the white ruling class out.
**
out. Apartheid-related predictions were often a bit off in this way, due mostly to outsiders imagining some sort of centuries-long, deep-seated race war, whereas it was a recent and quickly dated policy which was mostly prolonged because it somehow wound up as a part of Cold War politics. As soon as the policy was put up to a vote, it was rejected by overwhelming numbers.



* Lampshaded at the end of the 1952 novel ''Limbo'' by Bernard Wolfe. His novel is set in a fictional post-WWIII 1990's that maintains racial segregation, sexual discrimination, and ColdWar rivalries in a world of automated factories, rocket planes and nuclear-powered artificial limbs.

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* Lampshaded at the end of the 1952 novel ''Limbo'' by Bernard Wolfe. His novel is set in a fictional post-WWIII 1990's 1990s that maintains racial segregation, sexual discrimination, and ColdWar rivalries in a world of automated factories, rocket planes and nuclear-powered artificial limbs.




* An in-universe example in the short story “Literature/TomorrowTown”: the 1970s-1980s protagonist is sent to investigate a murder within a utopian bubble-society. He notices the prevalence of somewhat old-fashioned gender roles, and figures it is due to the society having been founded and sealed off from the rest of the world in the mid-1950s, when such gender roles were more common.
* In Frank Herbert's ''{{Literature/Dune}}'' (published 1965), the fact society has gone back to a kind of space feudalism ''sort'' of explains why Leto can't have more than one wife (thus preventing him from marrying the woman he actually loves, Jessica). However, when the powerful, feared, all-female psychic order of the Bene Gesserit exists, it really doesn't explain why teenage Paul the protagonist is brought into Leto's confidences, while Jessica--an adult, a highly skilled very badass Bene Gesserit, someone Leto trusts and loves completely and should have no reason to think can't handle the mess they're about to be in--is sidelined. Paul, mind you, ''is'' a prodigy with some pretty hefty superpowers himself (given the chance, he's actually stronger than his mother), so it's not that he shouldn't have been told, but the fact that he and Leto both unquestioningly exclude Jessica at first is very 60s.

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\n* An in-universe example in the short story “Literature/TomorrowTown”: "Literature/TomorrowTown": the 1970s-1980s protagonist is sent to investigate a murder within a utopian bubble-society. He notices the prevalence of somewhat old-fashioned gender roles, and figures it is due to the society having been founded and sealed off from the rest of the world in the mid-1950s, when such gender roles were more common.
* In Frank Herbert's ''{{Literature/Dune}}'' ''Literature/{{Dune}}'' (published 1965), the fact society has gone back to a kind of space feudalism ''sort'' of explains why Leto can't have more than one wife (thus preventing him from marrying the woman he actually loves, Jessica). However, when the powerful, feared, all-female psychic order of the Bene Gesserit exists, it really doesn't explain why teenage Paul the protagonist is brought into Leto's confidences, while Jessica--an adult, a highly skilled very badass Bene Gesserit, someone Leto trusts and loves completely and should have no reason to think can't handle the mess they're about to be in--is sidelined. Paul, mind you, ''is'' a prodigy with some pretty hefty superpowers himself (given the chance, he's actually stronger than his mother), so it's not that he shouldn't have been told, but the fact that he and Leto both unquestioningly exclude Jessica at first is very 60s.


* ''ComicBook/{{Camelot 3000}}'', written in the 1980s, had a [[UsefulNotes/TheApartheidEra still-segregated]] UsefulNotes/SouthAfrica in the eponymous year, far outdoing 2001. It also has Sir Tristan's angsting about being reincarnated as a woman, even though her reborn lover Isolde seems quite content to contemplate a lesbian relationship, and gender-reassignment surgery is bound to be as routine as a tummy-tuck by that era if Tristan is really not happy.

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* ''ComicBook/{{Camelot 3000}}'', ''ComicBook/Camelot3000'', written in the 1980s, had a [[UsefulNotes/TheApartheidEra still-segregated]] UsefulNotes/SouthAfrica in the eponymous year, far outdoing 2001. It also has Sir Tristan's angsting about being reincarnated as a woman, even though her reborn lover Isolde seems quite content to contemplate a lesbian relationship, and gender-reassignment surgery is bound to be as routine as a tummy-tuck by that era if Tristan is really not happy.


Added DiffLines:

* ''ComicBook/Armageddon2001'': In ''ComicBook/ActionComics'' Annual #3, President Superman is attempting to negotiate peace in UsefulNotes/NorthernIreland in 2001 but the parties aren't cooperating with either him or each other. In reality, UsefulNotes/{{the Troubles}} are seen as having ended with the signing of the Good Friday Agreement in 1998, something which was unforeseeable in 1991.


* ''Film/BackToTheFuturePartII'' assumed that JapanTakesOverTheWorld, that there would be a Japanese fax machine in every room of every house, and that every corporation would be run from Japan. All of this was from a common belief during the 1980s that Japan's superior electronics were going to allow it to become a global superpower. While Japan is a major economic driving force in TheNewTens, nothing like what ''Part II'' predicted came to pass. Also, [[ChinaTakesOverTheWorld another Asian country]] is seen as the challenge now.
** [[TechnologyMarchesOn Fax machines aren't doing all that well either.]]

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* ''Film/BackToTheFuturePartII'' assumed that JapanTakesOverTheWorld, that there would be a Japanese fax machine in every room of every house, and that every corporation would be run from Japan. All of this was from a common belief during the 1980s that Japan's superior electronics were going to allow it to become a global superpower. While Japan is a major economic driving force in TheNewTens, nothing like what ''Part II'' predicted came to pass. Also, [[ChinaTakesOverTheWorld another Asian country]] is seen as the challenge now.
**
now. [[TechnologyMarchesOn Fax machines aren't doing all that well either.]]

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