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* At the end of ''Film/AvengersEndgame'' [[spoiler:Captain America decides to stay in the past after putting the Infinity Stones back. He reconnects with the rest of the Avengers in modern day as an old man.''

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* At the end of ''Film/AvengersEndgame'' [[spoiler:Captain America decides to stay in the past after putting the Infinity Stones back. He reconnects with the rest of the Avengers in modern day as an old man.'']]''

Added DiffLines:

* At the end of ''Film/AvengersEndgame'' [[spoiler:Captain America decides to stay in the past after putting the Infinity Stones back. He reconnects with the rest of the Avengers in modern day as an old man.''

Added DiffLines:

* ''Manga/OnePunchMan'' has "Silverfang" Bang, the third-ranked S-Class Hero who's also the oldest at ''81 years old''. He can still keep up with those youngsters around him with his SupernaturalMartialArts and is still tough enough to shrug off getting smashed through a building and only complain about back and hip pain.


Often, in a show, they'll want to [[TheParody parody]] the 60s ''Franchise/{{Batman}}''-style {{superhero}}. However, if they do, the vast majority of the time it'll be a SuperHero who ''was'' active back then... but now is old, decrepit, and retired.

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Often, in a show, they'll want to [[TheParody parody]] the 60s ''Franchise/{{Batman}}''-style ''Series/{{Batman|1966}}''-style {{superhero}}. However, if they do, the vast majority of the time it'll be a SuperHero who ''was'' active back then... but now is old, decrepit, and retired.



This character rarely shows up in actual SuperHero [[ComicBookTropes comics]]. Instead, ComicBookTime usually applies; heroes don't age unless the story calls for them to or unless they don't appear in a comic for a while. If one does age, they'll usually still able to hold their own, often having their powers or equipment make up the difference. The original (Jay Garrick) [[Franchise/TheFlash Flash]] and the (Alan Scott) Franchise/GreenLantern are major examples of this; they may be in their 90s but between their adventures that led to their physical ages being slowed and their powers, they are respected elders in the Franchise/TheDCU's superhero community. Others become still-active [[CoolOldGuy Cool Old Guys]], just look at the ''ComicBook/JusticeSocietyOfAmerica''.

Prior to 2017, there was a significant chance that said character would be played by [[AdamWesting Adam West]], [[ActorAllusion in reference to]] his character on the 1960's ''Series/{{Batman}}'' series.

to:

This character rarely shows up in actual SuperHero [[ComicBookTropes comics]]. Instead, ComicBookTime usually applies; heroes don't age unless the story calls for them to or unless they don't appear in a comic for a while. If one does age, they'll usually still able to hold their own, often having their powers or equipment make up the difference. The original (Jay Garrick) [[Franchise/TheFlash Flash]] and the (Alan Scott) Franchise/GreenLantern are major examples of this; they may be in their 90s but between their adventures that led to their physical ages being slowed and their powers, they are respected elders in the Franchise/TheDCU's superhero community. Others become still-active [[CoolOldGuy Cool {{Cool Old Guys]], Guy}}s -- just look at the ''ComicBook/JusticeSocietyOfAmerica''.

Prior to 2017, there was a significant chance that said character would be played by [[AdamWesting Adam West]], Creator/AdamWest, [[ActorAllusion in reference to]] his character on the 1960's ''Series/{{Batman}}'' ''Series/Batman1966'' series.



* [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BQPOtS1-PGw The commercial]] for the ''VideoGame/SonicHeroes'' video game features the League of Superheroes. The commissioner rushes to their headquarters and tells them that the city is under attack, only to find that every member of the League of Superheroes is too elderly to do anything heroic. The announcer then says, "It's time for some new heroes.".

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* [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BQPOtS1-PGw The commercial]] for the ''VideoGame/SonicHeroes'' video game features the League of Superheroes. The commissioner rushes to their headquarters and tells them that the city is under attack, only to find that every member of the League of Superheroes is too elderly to do anything heroic. The announcer then says, "It's time for some new heroes."."



* ''ComicBook/TheDarkKnightReturns'' has an old superhero ''bar.'' The kicker is, the book is set in the future, so all the superheroes are (in the current continuity) young and active. It's also an old ''supervillain'' bar. And, this being a book about the badassery of Batman, if there's one thing that can spoil the mood, it's mentioning [[TheDreaded the Bat.]]

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* ''ComicBook/TheDarkKnightReturns'' ''ComicBook/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns'' has an old superhero ''bar.'' The kicker is, the book is set in the future, so all the superheroes are (in the current continuity) young and active. It's also an old ''supervillain'' bar. And, this being a book about the badassery of Batman, if there's one thing that can spoil the mood, it's mentioning [[TheDreaded the Bat.]]



* ''ComicBook/KingdomCome''. Notable in that many of the old characters are still badass and everyone has changed their costumes.

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* ''ComicBook/KingdomCome''.Played straight in ''ComicBook/KingdomCome''. Enough time has passed that Superman looks like he's in his 50s (greying about the temple, receeding hairline), while Batman is downright ''elderly'' looking, and uses an exosuit to get around. Notable in that many of the old characters are still badass and everyone has changed their costumes.



** And then there's the story "Old Times", where the aged Supersonic is called out of retirement to deal with one last crisis. In the olden days, he'd come up with some clever way of taking down the seemingly-impossible enemy- probably a nonlethal way that gets it into somewhere safe to fight. Now, he just whales on it until it breaks, [[DestructiveSavior destroying six blocks of residential buildings]] in the process. Sounds quite a bit like the shift into gritty realism that normal comics have gone through...

to:

** And then there's the story "Old Times", where the aged Supersonic is called out of retirement to deal with one last crisis. In the olden days, he'd come up with some clever way of taking down the seemingly-impossible enemy- probably a nonlethal way that gets it into somewhere safe to fight. Now, he just whales on it until it breaks, [[DestructiveSavior [[DestructiveSaviour destroying six blocks of residential buildings]] in the process. Sounds quite a bit like the shift into gritty realism that normal comics have gone through...



* Played straight in ''ComicBook/KingdomCome''. Enough time has passed that Superman looks like he's in his 50s (greying about the temple, receeding hairline), while batman is downright ''elderly'' looking, and uses an exosuit to get around.



* ''WesternAnimation/TheIncredibles'': Mr. Incredible is not as old as most of the examples shown here, but fifteen years after his forced retirement he is noticeably out of shape, and is still holding on to his glory days, even doing superhero work in secret. The scene in which he gets back INTO shape is entertaining. When an ordinary middle-aged man gets in shape he goes to the gym. When a {{Nigh Invulnerab|ility}}le middle-aged man with superhuman strength gets in shape... he hits the railroad yard.
** The sequel ''WesternAnimation/Incredibles2'' features an elderly super named Reflux, who can spew lava from his mouth. He holds up his own during the last third of the movie.

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* ''WesternAnimation/TheIncredibles'': Mr. Incredible is not as old as most of the examples shown here, but fifteen years after his forced retirement he is noticeably out of shape, and is still holding on to his glory days, even doing superhero work in secret. The scene in which he gets back INTO shape is entertaining. When an ordinary middle-aged man gets in shape he goes to the gym. When a {{Nigh Invulnerab|ility}}le middle-aged man with superhuman strength gets in shape... he hits the railroad yard.
**
yard. The sequel ''WesternAnimation/Incredibles2'' features an elderly super named Reflux, who can spew lava from his mouth. He holds up his own during the last third of the movie.



* The Swedish Advent Calendar series ''Series/{{Superhjaltejul}}'' centres around retired superheroes Stålhenrik (Steel-Henrik) and Supersnällasilversara (Superkindsilversara), telling the story about their first adventure to their grandchildren Vega and Nova.
* In ''Series/TheFlash1990'', Paul Winfield played a retired judge who moonlighted as a vigilante named Nightshade in the late '50s. He came out of retirement to join the Flash in fighting one of his old enemies who had emerged from [[HumanPopsicle cryogenic sleep]]. He returned to help deal with a young upstart who had taken on his persona, but called himself Deadly Nightshade as he killed criminals, which is something the original Nightshade would never do.
** ''Series/TheFlash2014'' introduces DC's best known one, Jay Garrick, first as a younger man, but [[spoiler: he's actually the villainous Zoom posing as the real deal, who proves to be an alternate version of Barry's father, played by John Wesley Shipp, who played the 90's Barry.]]

to:

* The Swedish Advent Calendar series ''Series/{{Superhjaltejul}}'' centres around retired superheroes Stålhenrik (Steel-Henrik) and Supersnällasilversara (Superkindsilversara), telling the story about their first adventure to their grandchildren Vega and Nova.
Nova.'
* ''Franchise/TheFlash'':
**
In ''Series/TheFlash1990'', Paul Winfield played a retired judge who moonlighted as a vigilante named Nightshade in the late '50s. He came out of retirement to join the Flash in fighting one of his old enemies who had emerged from [[HumanPopsicle cryogenic sleep]]. He returned to help deal with a young upstart who had taken on his persona, but called himself Deadly Nightshade as he killed criminals, which is something the original Nightshade would never do.
do.
** ''Series/TheFlash2014'' introduces DC's best known one, Jay Garrick, first as a younger man, but [[spoiler: he's actually the villainous Zoom posing as the real deal, who proves to be an alternate version of Barry's father, played by John Wesley Shipp, who played the 90's Barry.]]Barry]].



** Ulshade's ''Series/PowerRangersDinoCharge'' counterpart, Albert Smith, is even older [[spoiler: and he also doesn't keep the powers, though not due to age - he'd actually fabricated a lot of his exploits and was in truth a local do-gooder, more about getting cats out of trees than fighting supervillains, who'd never faced actual monsters before until he got on the BigBad's radar. He chooses to pass the powers on when he learns the situation.]]

to:

** Ulshade's ''Series/PowerRangersDinoCharge'' counterpart, Albert Smith, is even older [[spoiler: and he also doesn't keep the powers, though not due to age - he'd actually fabricated a lot of his exploits and was in truth a local do-gooder, more about getting cats out of trees than fighting supervillains, who'd never faced actual monsters before until he got on the BigBad's radar. He chooses to pass the powers on when he learns the situation.]]situation]].



%%[[folder:Music Videos]]
%%%* The video for the song "Kryptonite" by Music/ThreeDoorsDown
%%%[[/folder]]

[[folder:Professional Wrestling]]
* Almost entirely averted in most wrestling promotions. It doesn't matter how old or flabby Ric Flair, Terry Funk, or Jake "the Snake" Roberts gets. They'll still be portrayed as just as vital and strong as when they debuted.

to:

%%[[folder:Music [[folder:Music Videos]]
%%%* * [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xPU8OAjjS4k The video video]] for the song "Kryptonite" by Music/ThreeDoorsDown
%%%[[/folder]]

[[folder:Professional Wrestling]]
* Almost entirely averted in most wrestling promotions. It doesn't matter how old or flabby Ric Flair, Terry Funk, or Jake "the Snake" Roberts gets. They'll still be portrayed as just as vital and strong as when they debuted.
Music/ThreeDoorsDown.


Added DiffLines:

[[folder:Professional Wrestling]]
* Almost entirely averted in most wrestling promotions. It doesn't matter how old or flabby Wrestling/RicFlair, Wrestling/TerryFunk, or [[Wrestling/JakeRoberts Jake "the Snake" Roberts]] gets. They'll still be portrayed as just as vital and strong as when they debuted.
[[/folder]]

Added DiffLines:

* In the 1992 game ''Captain Dynamo''[[labelnote:*]] [[ComicBook/{{Dynamo5}} No relation]][[/labelnote]] the title character is an octogenarian ex-superhero who must emerge from retirement when his similarly-superannuated nemesis, Austen Von Flyswatter, pulls off the world's biggest diamond heist.


* Pretty much one of the things that defines the ComicBook/JusticeSocietyOfAmerica is the amount of Golden Age superheroes (appropriately aged) that comprise its roster. Even though they've had young heroes like Stargirl and Damage, the first thing that comes to mind when talking about the JSA are the veterans: [[Franchise/TheFlash Jay Garrick]], [[Franchise/GreenLantern Alan Scott]], [[ComicBook/DoctorFate Kent Nelson]], Ted Grant (Wildcat) and so on. In a subversion, though, they still display the same degree of physical preparation and badassitude from the time they were created. Out of all of them the most impressive has got to be the original ComicBook/RedTornado who was an old superhero [[UpToEleven in the 40's.]]

to:

* Pretty much one of the things that defines the ComicBook/JusticeSocietyOfAmerica is the amount of Golden Age superheroes (appropriately aged) that comprise its roster. Even though they've had young heroes like Stargirl ComicBook/{{Stargirl|DCComics}} and Damage, the first thing that comes to mind when talking about the JSA are the veterans: [[Franchise/TheFlash Jay Garrick]], [[Franchise/GreenLantern Alan Scott]], [[ComicBook/DoctorFate Kent Nelson]], [[ComicBook/{{Wildcat}} Ted Grant (Wildcat) Grant]] and so on. on, who founded the team during WWII. In a subversion, though, they still display the same degree of physical preparation and badassitude from the time they were created.created, and those who have lost an edge due to their age have found ways to make up for it. Out of all of them the most impressive has got to be the original ComicBook/RedTornado who was an old superhero [[UpToEleven in the 40's.]]


* ''ComicBook/AstroCity'' is rife with examples of this trope, as it establishes a long history of generational superheroes, and the series' avoidance of ComicBookTime means characters age as new stories are published. Some (e.g. The Confessor, The Hanged Man) are extraordinarily long-lived, but some have retired and still make appearances in various capacities (many of them at former hero [[GoodGuyBar K.O. Carson's bar, Bruisers]]). The oldest we know of was Coyotl, who was (presumably significantly) pre-Colonial Native American. The oldest that we know is still alive is Iron Horse, a steam-powered automaton who's been active in some form since the 1860s.

to:

* ''ComicBook/AstroCity'' is rife with examples of this trope, as it establishes a long history of generational superheroes, and the series' avoidance of ComicBookTime means characters age as new stories are published. Some (e.g. The Confessor, The Hanged Man) are extraordinarily long-lived, but some have retired and still make appearances in various capacities (many of them at former hero [[GoodGuyBar K.O. Carson's bar, Bruisers]]).Bruisers]]), and at least one passed away from presumably age related reasons after their initial appearances (Noah of the Crossbreed). The oldest we know of was Coyotl, who was (presumably significantly) pre-Colonial Native American. The oldest that we know is still alive is Iron Horse, a steam-powered automaton who's been active in some form since the 1860s.


* ''ComicBook/TheAuthority''. In response to the eponymous team staging a bloodless coup, a BigBad brings back a stable of [=WW2=] superheroes [[note]]Thinly veiled expies of the Comicbook/FreedomFighters team from DC[[/note]] who are decrepit and senile in a retirement home. He reverses their aging and turns up their powers and sets them loose to start a revolution. Things go very wrong. Now the leader of the team impales cops on the American flag and anyone who freely chose the Authority religion gets slaughtered.

to:

* ''ComicBook/TheAuthority''. In response to the eponymous team staging a bloodless coup, a BigBad brings back a stable of [=WW2=] superheroes [[note]]Thinly veiled expies of the Comicbook/FreedomFighters team from DC[[/note]] who are decrepit and senile in a retirement home. He reverses their aging and turns up their powers and sets them loose to start a revolution. Things go very ''very'' wrong. Now the leader of the team impales cops on the American flag and anyone who freely chose the Authority religion gets slaughtered.



** And then there's the story "Old Times", where the aged Supersonic is called out of retirement to deal with one last crisis. In the olden days, he'd come up with some clever way of taking down the seemingly-impossible enemy- probably a nonlethal way that gets it into somewhere safe to fight. Now, he just whales on it until it breaks, [[DestructiveSavior destroying six blocks of residential buildings]] in the process. Sounds a bit like the shift into gritty realism that normal comics have gone through...

to:

** And then there's the story "Old Times", where the aged Supersonic is called out of retirement to deal with one last crisis. In the olden days, he'd come up with some clever way of taking down the seemingly-impossible enemy- probably a nonlethal way that gets it into somewhere safe to fight. Now, he just whales on it until it breaks, [[DestructiveSavior destroying six blocks of residential buildings]] in the process. Sounds quite a bit like the shift into gritty realism that normal comics have gone through...



* One ''Franchise/{{Superman}}'' comic featured a retirement home for supervillains, who sat around still dressed in their costumes reminiscing about their GloryDays. Mention must also be made of ''ComicBook/SupermanAtEarthsEnd'', which features an aging, bearded Superman . . . who battles twin clones of Adolf Hitler. It is not as interesting as it sounds.

to:

* One ''Franchise/{{Superman}}'' comic featured a retirement home for supervillains, who sat around still dressed in their costumes reminiscing about their GloryDays. Mention must also be made of ''ComicBook/SupermanAtEarthsEnd'', which features an aging, bearded Superman . . . who battles twin clones of Adolf Hitler.Hitler with a [[MoreDakka MASSIVE]] [[SuperheroPackingHeat gun]]. It is not as interesting as it sounds.


** The sentai franchise, and its sister series ''Franchise/KamenRider,'' have been around long enough that when the earlier members show up for {{Reunion Show}}s, they qualify as this. The heroes of the 70s are often approaching ''their'' 70s, and it won't stop 'em from kicking monster butt right alongside the new guys. Yes, they ''do'' still get unmorphed fight scenes, proving that the actors are {{Badass Grandpa}}s in reality too, making it look as good as they ever did!

to:

** The sentai franchise, and its sister series ''Franchise/KamenRider,'' have been around long enough that when the earlier members show up for {{Reunion Show}}s, they qualify as this. The heroes of the 70s are often approaching ''their'' 70s, and it won't stop 'em from kicking monster butt right alongside the new guys. Yes, they ''do'' still get unmorphed fight scenes, proving that the actors are {{Badass Grandpa}}s tough in reality too, making it look as good as they ever did!



[[folder:Music Videos]]
* The video for the song "Kryptonite" by Music/ThreeDoorsDown was built entirely around this trope.

to:

[[folder:Music %%[[folder:Music Videos]]
* %%%* The video for the song "Kryptonite" by Music/ThreeDoorsDown was built Music/ThreeDoorsDown
%%%[[/folder]]

[[folder:Professional Wrestling]]
* Almost
entirely around this trope.averted in most wrestling promotions. It doesn't matter how old or flabby Ric Flair, Terry Funk, or Jake "the Snake" Roberts gets. They'll still be portrayed as just as vital and strong as when they debuted.



[[folder:Professional Wrestling]]
* Almost entirely averted in most wrestling promotions. It doesn't matter how old or flabby Ric Flair, Terry Funk, or Jake "the Snake" Roberts gets. They'll still be portrayed as just as vital and strong as when they debuted.
[[/folder]]


** ''Series/TheFlash2014'' introduces DC's best known one, Jay Garrick, first as a younger man, but [[spoiler: he's actually the villainous Zoom posing as the real deal, who proves to be an alternate version of Barry's father, played by John Wesley Shipp, who played the 90's Barry.]]

to:

** ''Series/TheFlash2014'' **''Series/TheFlash2014'' introduces DC's best known one, Jay Garrick, first as a younger man, but [[spoiler: he's actually the villainous Zoom posing as the real deal, who proves to be an alternate version of Barry's father, played by John Wesley Shipp, who played the 90's Barry.]]



** The sentai franchise, and its sister series ''Franchise/KamenRider,'' have been around long enough that when the earlier members show up for {{Reunion Show}}s, they qualify as this. The heroes of the 70s are often approaching ''their'' 70s, and it won't stop 'em from kicking monster butt right alongside the new guys. Yes, they ''do'' still get unmorphed fight scenes, proving that the actors are {{Badass Grandpa}}s in reality too, making it look as good as they ever did!
->''"My name is [[Series/KamenRider Takeshi Hongo]]. [[BadassBoast I protect people's freedom to the best of my ability]]."''[[note: It's a BadassBoast to those who know what the best of ''his'' ability looks like.]]

to:

** The **The sentai franchise, and its sister series ''Franchise/KamenRider,'' have been around long enough that when the earlier members show up for {{Reunion Show}}s, they qualify as this. The heroes of the 70s are often approaching ''their'' 70s, and it won't stop 'em from kicking monster butt right alongside the new guys. Yes, they ''do'' still get unmorphed fight scenes, proving that the actors are {{Badass Grandpa}}s in reality too, making it look as good as they ever did!
->''"My --->''"My name is [[Series/KamenRider Takeshi Hongo]]. [[BadassBoast I protect people's freedom to the best of my ability]]."''[[note: It's "'' [[note]]It's a BadassBoast to those who know what the best of ''his'' ability looks like.]]
[[/note]]


** ''Series/TheFlash2014'' introduces DC's best known one, Jay Garrick, first as a younger man, but [[spoiler: he's actually the villainous Zoom posing as the real deal, who proves to be an alternate version of Barry's father, played by John Wesley Shipp, who played the 90's Barry.]]

to:

** ''Series/TheFlash2014'' **''Series/TheFlash2014'' introduces DC's best known one, Jay Garrick, first as a younger man, but [[spoiler: he's actually the villainous Zoom posing as the real deal, who proves to be an alternate version of Barry's father, played by John Wesley Shipp, who played the 90's Barry.]]



** The sentai franchise, and its sister series ''Franchise/KamenRider,'' have been around long enough that when the earlier members show up for {{Reunion Show}}s, they qualify as this. The heroes of the 70s are often approaching ''their'' 70s, and it won't stop 'em from kicking monster butt right alongside the new guys. Yes, they ''do'' still get unmorphed fight scenes.

to:

** The **The sentai franchise, and its sister series ''Franchise/KamenRider,'' have been around long enough that when the earlier members show up for {{Reunion Show}}s, they qualify as this. The heroes of the 70s are often approaching ''their'' 70s, and it won't stop 'em from kicking monster butt right alongside the new guys. Yes, they ''do'' still get unmorphed fight scenes.
scenes, proving that the actors are {{Badass Grandpa}}s in reality too, making it look as good as they ever did!
->''"My name is [[Series/KamenRider Takeshi Hongo]]. [[BadassBoast I protect people's freedom to the best of my ability]]."''[[note: It's a BadassBoast to those who know what the best of ''his'' ability looks like.]]


* Dr Ulshade from ''Series/ZyudenSentaiKyoryuger'' is still a Ranger despite being in his late fifties, bad back and all. [[spoiler: His teenage granddaughter takes over the role soon after his first appearance.]]
* Ulshade's ''Series/PowerRangersDinoCharge'' counterpart, Albert Smith, is even older [[spoiler: and his age is a factor in his decision to give up his Ranger powers.]]

to:

**''Series/TheFlash2014'' introduces DC's best known one, Jay Garrick, first as a younger man, but [[spoiler: he's actually the villainous Zoom posing as the real deal, who proves to be an alternate version of Barry's father, played by John Wesley Shipp, who played the 90's Barry.]]
* Dr Ulshade from ''Series/ZyudenSentaiKyoryuger'' is still a Ranger despite being in his late fifties, bad back and all. [[spoiler: His teenage granddaughter takes over the role soon after his first appearance.appearance, the bad back being what convinces him to retire.]]
* ** Ulshade's ''Series/PowerRangersDinoCharge'' counterpart, Albert Smith, is even older [[spoiler: and he also doesn't keep the powers, though not due to age - he'd actually fabricated a lot of his age is a factor exploits and was in his decision truth a local do-gooder, more about getting cats out of trees than fighting supervillains, who'd never faced actual monsters before until he got on the BigBad's radar. He chooses to give pass the powers on when he learns the situation.]]
**The sentai franchise, and its sister series ''Franchise/KamenRider,'' have been around long enough that when the earlier members show
up his Ranger powers.]]for {{Reunion Show}}s, they qualify as this. The heroes of the 70s are often approaching ''their'' 70s, and it won't stop 'em from kicking monster butt right alongside the new guys. Yes, they ''do'' still get unmorphed fight scenes.


[[caption-width-right:350:[-Bikini Bottom's noblest, boldest, ''oldest'' superheroes.-] ]]

to:

[[caption-width-right:350:[-Bikini [[caption-width-right:350:Bikini Bottom's noblest, boldest, ''oldest'' superheroes.-] ]]

Added DiffLines:

* Ulshade's ''Series/PowerRangersDinoCharge'' counterpart, Albert Smith, is even older [[spoiler: and his age is a factor in his decision to give up his Ranger powers.]]


* One ''Franchise/{{Superman}}'' comic featured a retirement home for supervillains, who sat around still dressed in their costumes reminiscing about their GloryDays. Mention must also be made of ''ComicBook/SupermanAtEarthsEnd'', which features an aging, bearded Superman . . . who battles twin clones of Adolf Hitler.

to:

* One ''Franchise/{{Superman}}'' comic featured a retirement home for supervillains, who sat around still dressed in their costumes reminiscing about their GloryDays. Mention must also be made of ''ComicBook/SupermanAtEarthsEnd'', which features an aging, bearded Superman . . . who battles twin clones of Adolf Hitler. It is not as interesting as it sounds.

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