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OlderThanFeudalism--Tacitus wrote of the noble Germanic and Caledonian tribes to contrast with his view of Roman society as decadent and corrupt, and even [[HistoricalHeroUpgrade wrote eloquent Roman-style speeches about liberty and honor for "his versions" of Calgacus and Arminius]]. The trope has gone in and out of fashion over time, usually contrasting a decadent distrustful "city life" that a thinker feels has tarnished the essentially good nature of humanity. At different times, and in different hands, it has appeared in two main forms. One is that the life is strenuous and therefore the savage is nobly brave, hard-working, and honorable, though not by any means perfect. The other is that the savage is not {{greed}}y and does not have a taste for luxury and is content when he has what he actually ''needs'', and so the life is ultimately easy and pleasant, without all the striving after more. (Still, [[BewareTheNiceOnes do not get on their bad side.]]) In the USA, the Noble Savage came into style in the mid-1800s, about the time a lot of Western states/territories got their names. This left many geographical features with names of [[ShownTheirWork Indian]] (or at least [[AsLongAsItSoundsForeign Indian-sounding]]) extraction.

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OlderThanFeudalism--Tacitus Examples of this trope that are OlderThanFeudalism exist outside the Americas: Tacitus wrote of the noble Germanic and Caledonian tribes to contrast with his view of Roman society as decadent and corrupt, and even [[HistoricalHeroUpgrade wrote eloquent Roman-style speeches about liberty and honor for "his versions" of Calgacus and Arminius]]. The trope has gone in and out of fashion over time, usually contrasting a decadent distrustful "city life" that a thinker feels has tarnished the essentially good nature of humanity. At different times, and in different hands, it has appeared in two main forms. One is that the life is strenuous and therefore the savage is nobly brave, hard-working, and honorable, though not by any means perfect. The other is that the savage is not {{greed}}y and does not have a taste for luxury and is content when he has what he actually ''needs'', and so the life is ultimately easy and pleasant, without all the striving after more. (Still, [[BewareTheNiceOnes do not get on their bad side.]]) In the USA, the Noble Savage came into style in the mid-1800s, about the time a lot of Western states/territories got their names. This left many geographical features with names of [[ShownTheirWork Indian]] (or at least [[AsLongAsItSoundsForeign Indian-sounding]]) extraction.


A character who is, due to their race or ethnicity, a member of a [[HollywoodNatives barbaric or savage tribe]] (or a group simply ''perceived'' as such by others), and because of it portrayed as nobler or of higher moral fibre than the norm. (Often regarded as living the GoodOldWays). In American works, the savages in question are quite often American Indians. In European works, native African people tend to be more common. Rare nowadays, except as a SciFi alien--though it has made something of a comeback with the idea of MagicalNativeAmerican people being more in tune with nature than the greedy white people.

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A character who is, due to their race or ethnicity, a member of a [[HollywoodNatives barbaric or savage tribe]] (or alternately, a group simply ''perceived'' as such by others), outsiders), and because of it portrayed as nobler or of higher moral fibre than the norm. (Often regarded as living the GoodOldWays). In American works, the savages in question are quite often American Indians. In European works, native African people tend to be more common. Rare nowadays, except as a SciFi alien--though it has made something of a comeback with the idea of MagicalNativeAmerican people being more in tune with nature than the greedy white people.


* The Noble Savage trope is in part based on generalizations about Native Americans. There is a kernel of truth to the idea that they lived within nature, were not as commerce oriented, and had matriarchal input, but the problems of the trope come when this is idealized, and ''anything'' too "Western" is automatically bad, even in the face of all logic (for example, modern technology). People have been to known to demand that Aztecs be depicted as ''less'' sophisticated than they really were in order to fit in closer with this trope, complaining that terms like “provincial” and “months” ought to be avoided in favor of "country" and "moons" (never mind that the Aztecs had a ''solar'' calendar and an empire spanning central America). There are noble values in Western culture, too. There are noble values in any culture — and, because all human cultures are made up of real live human beings, some of the members of each one live up to their values and some don't. The reason that this trope has UnfortunateImplications is because it implies that this fact, which is true about all human beings, is not true about Native Americans — which, in turn, implies that Native Americans aren't fully human. In general, a common criticism of most post-colonial scholarship is that it tends to over indulge in this trope--unquestioningly praising "native" people and cultures while glossing over some of the less pleasant aspects. For example, Marshall Sahlins, who theorized that hunter-gatherer societies actually enjoyed higher standards of living and greater social equality than "civilized" humans, and dismissed those things that hunter-gatherer societies lack as not really worth having to begin with. Other scholars and researchers have also deconstructed this argument by pointing out the biases, selective lenses and idealized framing that tends to come along with this trope, as well as the tendencies for double standards and condescending attitudes. Sahlins is the source of the "original affluent society" idea for instance, claiming hunter-gatherer groups only needed to work about fifteen to twenty hours a week and could spent the rest how they pleased. However, he defined "work" as solely food gathering, excluding food ''preparation'' entirely. When this was added, it averaged around 40-45 hours of work per week-that is, around the same as most modern people in the West have.

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* The Noble Savage trope is in part based on generalizations about Native Americans. There is a kernel of truth to the idea that they lived within nature, were not as commerce oriented, and had matriarchal input, but the problems of the trope come when this is idealized, and ''anything'' too "Western" is automatically bad, even in the face of all logic (for example, modern technology). People have been to known to demand that Aztecs be depicted as ''less'' sophisticated than they really were in order to fit in closer with this trope, complaining that terms like “provincial” and “months” ought to be avoided in favor of "country" and "moons" (never mind that the Aztecs had a ''solar'' calendar and an empire spanning central America). There are noble values in Western culture, too. There are noble values in any culture — and, because all human cultures are made up of real live human beings, some of the members of each one live up to their values and some don't. The reason that this trope has UnfortunateImplications is because it implies that this fact, which is true about all human beings, is not true about Native Americans — which, in turn, implies that Native Americans aren't fully human. In general, a common criticism of most post-colonial scholarship is that it tends to over indulge in this trope--unquestioningly praising "native" people and cultures while glossing over some of the less pleasant aspects. For example, Marshall Sahlins, who theorized that hunter-gatherer societies actually enjoyed higher standards of living and greater social equality than "civilized" humans, and dismissed those things that hunter-gatherer societies lack as not really worth having to begin with. Other scholars and researchers have also deconstructed this argument by pointing out the biases, selective lenses and idealized framing that tends to come along with this trope, as well as the tendencies for double standards and condescending attitudes. Sahlins is the source of the "original affluent society" idea for instance, claiming hunter-gatherer groups only needed to work about fifteen to twenty hours a week and could spent the rest how they pleased. However, he defined "work" as solely food gathering, thus excluding food ''preparation'' entirely. When this was added, it averaged around 40-45 hours of work per week-that is, around the same as most modern people in the West have.



* A lot of people frown on certain practices done by industrial societies but are complimentary of nearly identical practices done by tribal societies. For example a lot people frown on any product, ''especially'' food, made with byproducts. Some of those same people also think its noble that several Native American tribes did not waste any part of the animal they killed. However this practice and the use of byproducts are basically the same thing.

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* A lot of people frown on certain practices done by industrial societies but are complimentary of nearly identical practices done by tribal societies. For example a lot of people frown on any product, ''especially'' food, made with byproducts. Some of those same people also think its noble that several Native American tribes did not waste any part of the animal they killed. However this practice and the use of byproducts are basically the same thing.


** The series' backstory mentions the Lilmothiit, a race of [[PettingZooPeople "Fox Folk"]] native to Black Marsh as being primitive, tribal, and nomadic. Unfortunately, they were rendered extinct in the 2nd Era in a combination of conflicts with the [[LizardFolk Argonians]] and the [[MysticalPlague Knahaten Flu]]. Exactly where they fall on the scale between "noble" and "savage" is thus unknown.

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** The series' backstory mentions the Lilmothiit, a race of [[PettingZooPeople [[BeastMan "Fox Folk"]] native to Black Marsh as being primitive, tribal, and nomadic. Unfortunately, they were rendered extinct in the 2nd Era in a combination of conflicts with the [[LizardFolk Argonians]] and the [[MysticalPlague Knahaten Flu]]. Exactly where they fall on the scale between "noble" and "savage" is thus unknown.

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** Riverwind and Goldmoon's Que-Shu tribe also had its own internal conflicts. These stemmed from Loreman, the tribal historian who wanted to be TheStarscream to Goldmoon's chieftain father, and Loreman's jealous son Hollow-sky, who tried to forcibly marry Goldmoon and become chieftain.

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* Referenced in ''Film/HeartOfDarkness1958''. The reason Kurtz wanted to go to the Congo was because it was "the one place left on Earth that still had innocence."


* Depending on the culture of the people group in question, this trope ''can'' be true. In fact, it is [[OlderthanDirt]] since we have evidence of the modern human population being more advanced and violent than the more introverted and simple Neanderthal population. However, there wasn't a genocide so much as the latter was absorbed into the former's larger population.


A character who is, due to their race or ethnicity, a member of a [[HollywoodNatives barbaric or savage tribe]] (or a group simply ''perceived'' as such by others), and because of it portrayed as nobler or of higher moral fibre than the norm. (Often regarded as living the GoodOldWays). In American works, the savages in question are quite often American Indians. In European works, native African people tend to be more common. Rare nowadays, except as a SciFi alien--though it has made something of a comeback with the idea of MagicalNativeAmerican people being more in tune with nature than the greedy white people, and with prehistoric settings with the Neanderthals often being the peaceful savage with the Cro-Magnon as more hostile, despite having a more advanced culture.

to:

A character who is, due to their race or ethnicity, a member of a [[HollywoodNatives barbaric or savage tribe]] (or a group simply ''perceived'' as such by others), and because of it portrayed as nobler or of higher moral fibre than the norm. (Often regarded as living the GoodOldWays). In American works, the savages in question are quite often American Indians. In European works, native African people tend to be more common. Rare nowadays, except as a SciFi alien--though it has made something of a comeback with the idea of MagicalNativeAmerican people being more in tune with nature than the greedy white people, and with prehistoric settings with the Neanderthals often being the peaceful savage with the Cro-Magnon as more hostile, despite having a more advanced culture.
people.


A character who is, due to their race or ethnicity, a member of a [[HollywoodNatives barbaric or savage tribe]] (or a group simply ''perceived'' as such by others), and because of it portrayed as nobler or of higher moral fibre than the norm. (Often regarded as living the GoodOldWays). In American works, the savages in question are quite often American Indians. In European works, native African people tend to be more common. Rare nowadays, except as a SciFi alien--though it has made something of a comeback with the idea of MagicalNativeAmerican people being more in tune with nature than the greedy white people.

to:

A character who is, due to their race or ethnicity, a member of a [[HollywoodNatives barbaric or savage tribe]] (or a group simply ''perceived'' as such by others), and because of it portrayed as nobler or of higher moral fibre than the norm. (Often regarded as living the GoodOldWays). In American works, the savages in question are quite often American Indians. In European works, native African people tend to be more common. Rare nowadays, except as a SciFi alien--though it has made something of a comeback with the idea of MagicalNativeAmerican people being more in tune with nature than the greedy white people.
people, and with prehistoric settings with the Neanderthals often being the peaceful savage with the Cro-Magnon as more hostile, despite having a more advanced culture.


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* Depending on the culture of the people group in question, this trope ''can'' be true. In fact, it is [[OlderthanDirt]] since we have evidence of the modern human population being more advanced and violent than the more introverted and simple Neanderthal population. However, there wasn't a genocide so much as the latter was absorbed into the former's larger population.

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* In the 1947 Hillard and Sigman song "Civilization", a Congolese native mocks the attempts of the missionaries and other "educated savages" to get him and his fellows to embrace Western civilization, pointing out all the flaws and troubles of modern living.
-->''They hurry like savages to get aboard an iron train\\
And though it's smoky and it's crowded, they're too civilized to complain\\
When they've got two weeks vacation, they hurry to vacation ground\\
They swim and they fish, but that's what I do all year round!''

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* ''Seriously'' averted on William Golding's ''Literature/LordOfTheFlies''

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[[folder:Web Animation]]
* ''WebAnimation/FreedomToons'': Elizabeth Warren's spurious claims to Native ancestry are mocked by sarcastically depicting her as a Pocahontas-type figure who fears the White Man's DNA test influx into their lands.
[[/folder]]


* The French film ''Ridicule'', which takes place shortly before the French Revolution, at one point involves a royal medal ceremony for an Indian chieftain who arrives in full tribal dress and has the name "Stinks of Bear", yet observing nobility say with some chagrin that despite his dress and less-than-flattering name he appears more noble than any of the foppish nobles at Versailles.

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* The French film ''Ridicule'', which takes place shortly before the French Revolution, at one point involves a royal medal ceremony for an Indian chieftain who arrives in full tribal dress and has the name "Stinks of is named "Stinking Bear", yet observing nobility French observers say with some chagrin that despite his dress and less-than-flattering name he appears more noble than any of the foppish nobles peerage at Versailles.

Added DiffLines:

* The French film ''Ridicule'', which takes place shortly before the French Revolution, at one point involves a royal medal ceremony for an Indian chieftain who arrives in full tribal dress and has the name "Stinks of Bear", yet observing nobility say with some chagrin that despite his dress and less-than-flattering name he appears more noble than any of the foppish nobles at Versailles.

Added DiffLines:

* A lot of people frown on certain practices done by industrial societies but are complimentary of nearly identical practices done by tribal societies. For example a lot people frown on any product, ''especially'' food, made with byproducts. Some of those same people also think its noble that several Native American tribes did not waste any part of the animal they killed. However this practice and the use of byproducts are basically the same thing.

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