Follow TV Tropes

Following

History Main / LostAesop

Go To



%%This list is in alphabetical order. Please put your example in the correct place.



* ''Manga/ACentaursLife'' has strong themes about [[CaptainObvious how racism is bad]]. Except that it goes so far that the society depicted is restrictive to the point that accidental racism is a crime that will get someone sent to a reeducation center (accidental racism being things like riding on a centaur's back because she picked you up to carry you to get medical aid after you collapsed due to exhaustion), coming across as PoliticalCorrectnessGoneMad.



* ''Manga/ACentaursLife'' has strong themes about [[CaptainObvious how racism is bad]]. Except that it goes so far that the society depicted is restrictive to the point that accidental racism is a crime that will get someone sent to a reeducation center (accidental racism being things like riding on a centaur's back because she picked you up to carry you to get medical aid after you collapsed due to exhaustion), coming across as PoliticalCorrectnessGoneMad.






* In the children's book ''Literature/NotQuiteNarwhal'', a unicorn named Kelp is raised by narwhals and thinks he is one. He then meets some unicorns and realises he's a unicorn and when he tells the narwhals, they already know. He has trouble deciding whether to live with the unicorns or the narwhals, but then eventually they all decide to live on/near the beach. Taken at face value, this could mean "You can live in two places at once", but obviously you can't, so maybe it's an allegory-- but for what? It could be adoption but he's stated to be born underwater and dislike narwhal food. It could be being LGBT+, but he doesn't like unicorns (equivalent to being [[GayAesop gay]] or [[BiTheWay bi]]) or feel like he's trapped in the body of another species (equivalent to being trans) and the narwhals knew he was a unicorn from day one, so the real meaning of the story is a mystery.



* PETA's DarkerAndEdgier take on ''VideoGame/CookingMama'', ''VideoGame/CookingMamaMamaKillsAnimals'', comes off as an attempt to show the evils of eating meat; however, the game itself really only gives the aesop "Turkey meat comes from turkeys, AndThatsTerrible." The game was so hilariously bad, Majesco had the Cooking Mama character issue a response, knowing there was no way anybody was going to take it seriously.

to:

* PETA's DarkerAndEdgier take on DarkParody of ''VideoGame/CookingMama'', ''VideoGame/CookingMamaMamaKillsAnimals'', comes off as an attempt to show the evils of eating meat; however, the game itself really only gives the aesop "Turkey meat comes from turkeys, AndThatsTerrible." The game was so hilariously bad, Majesco had the Cooking Mama character issue a response, knowing there was no way anybody was going to take it seriously.seriously.
* ''VideoGame/Injustice2'' tries to have it both ways with its examination of the Regime and the Insurgency. The game makes it clear that first, the villains of the DCU ''need'' to be stopped, that Arkham Asylum, the Phantom Zone and other [[CardboardPrison cardboard institutions]] aren't stopping them, and that the Regime's brutal methods have been effective in putting the Joker and other villains down for keeps. By the same token, this willingness to kill has desensitized the heroes of the Regime to violence, turning them into murderous tyrants who are just as willing to kill heroes who get in their way. In the end, the game ends up with an inversion of BothSidesHaveAPoint: the Regime are bad guys, but the Insurgency has no answer to the question "so what do we do instead?" Accordingly, the actual message of the game is a muddle.
* ''VideoGame/MegaManStarForce 2'' forgets its own aesop ''when it's being told to the player'' and changes to the first game's, which only barely applies in this game. Thankfully, the writers get their act together and know what they're doing in the third game.



* ''VideoGame/MegaManStarForce 2'' forgets its own aesop ''when it's being told to the player'' and changes to the first game's, which only barely applies in this game. Thankfully, the writers get their act together and know what they're doing in the third game.
* ''VideoGame/Injustice2'' tries to have it both ways with its examination of the Regime and the Insurgency. The game makes it clear that first, the villains of the DCU ''need'' to be stopped, that Arkham Asylum, the Phantom Zone and other [[CardboardPrison cardboard institutions]] aren't stopping them, and that the Regime's brutal methods have been effective in putting the Joker and other villains down for keeps. By the same token, this willingness to kill has desensitized the heroes of the Regime to violence, turning them into murderous tyrants who are just as willing to kill heroes who get in their way. In the end, the game ends up with an inversion of BothSidesHaveAPoint: the Regime are bad guys, but the Insurgency has no answer to the question "so what do we do instead?" Accordingly, the actual message of the game is a muddle.



* Creator/JonBois lampshades this in his video "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F9H9LwGmc-0 The Search for the Saddest Punt in the World]]", a listing of various times in football where a team should clearly have tried to advance the ball or gone for a field goal rather than punting. He spends most of the video explaining these instances as a cautionary tale, where players were so cowardly that they GaveUpTooSoon and snatched defeat from the jaws of victory, proclaiming that "this is what losing teams do"... then, at the end, he reveals that, of the ten instances listed, six ended in victory for the punters, one was a tie, and of the three that lost, one followed up that game with a lengthy winning streak, including a Super Bowl. He concludes that he has no idea what he's trying to say.



* Creator/JonBois lampshades this in his video "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F9H9LwGmc-0 The Search for the Saddest Punt in the World]]", a listing of various times in football where a team should clearly have tried to advance the ball or gone for a field goal rather than punting. He spends most of the video explaining these instances as a cautionary tale, where players were so cowardly that they GaveUpTooSoon and snatched defeat from the jaws of victory, proclaiming that "this is what losing teams do"... then, at the end, he reveals that, of the ten instances listed, six ended in victory for the punters, one was a tie, and of the three that lost, one followed up that game with a lengthy winning streak, including a Super Bowl. He concludes that he has no idea what he's trying to say.


Added DiffLines:

* ''WesternAnimation/TheLoudHouse'' episode "One Flu Over the Loud House" is about the Loud family [[SickEpisode getting the flu]] one by one, while Lincoln [[PlagueZombie treats it as a zombie apocalypse]] and Leni claims that they should take care of them instead. Lincoln is usually the voice of reason while Leni is [[TheDitz dumb]], but on the other hand, Leni is also known for being the kindest Loud and at the end, Lincoln puts himself in front of Luna's snot to (unsuccessfully) protect Leni because he believes he was being mean and she deserves to be healthy more than him and at the end Clyde says that "just because the Louds are infected [with the flu virus] doesn't mean they're not human". However, the Louds really were acting like zombies while sick and at the end, the whole family got sick anyway. So it's hard to tell if we were meant to side with Lincoln, with Leni, or if there was no moral.


Added DiffLines:

** In "Homer Simpson in: 'Kidney Trouble'", Grandpa Simpson's kidneys explode, so Homer has to donate a kidney but wusses out, so they perform the surgery against his will. It's hard to tell if this has a moral about helping those in need or if it's just BlackComedy because on the one hand Homer has to have the kidney transplant performed against his will, he's not happy to find out about it, and the reason for the kidneys exploding was a bit silly (apparently Grandpa [[PottyEmergency held his pee in too long]]), but on the other hand, the possibility that Grandpa might die is portrayed completely seriously.


** Parodied yet again in "Homer Goes to College." Homer announces he learned the values of diligence and study, while the nerds learned to enjoy the outside world. The nerds point out that they hated the outside world, and Lisa reminds Homer that he cheated to get a passing grade, so nobody learned anything. Marge then demands Homer take the course again, so he can actually get something out of it this time. (Funnily, the actual moral of the episode is a lot simpler: "don't assume CollegeIsHighSchoolPartTwo.")

to:

** Parodied yet again in "Homer Goes to College." Homer announces he learned the values of diligence and study, while the nerds learned to enjoy the outside world. The nerds point out that they hated the outside world, and Lisa reminds Homer that he cheated to get a passing grade, so nobody learned anything. Marge then demands Homer take the course again, so he can actually get something out of it this time. (Funnily, the actual moral of the episode is a lot simpler: "don't assume CollegeIsHighSchoolPartTwo.CollegeIsHighSchoolPart2.")

Added DiffLines:

** Parodied yet again in "Homer Goes to College." Homer announces he learned the values of diligence and study, while the nerds learned to enjoy the outside world. The nerds point out that they hated the outside world, and Lisa reminds Homer that he cheated to get a passing grade, so nobody learned anything. Marge then demands Homer take the course again, so he can actually get something out of it this time. (Funnily, the actual moral of the episode is a lot simpler: "don't assume CollegeIsHighSchoolPartTwo.")


* In ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII'', it's rather obvious that the creators wanted to say '''something''' about whether the actions of the human race should doom them to be destroyed. But since picking a side would ultimately make someone angry - either they're suggesting [[HumansAreBastards the human race is irredeemably evil]], or that environmental damage to the planet isn't all that bad (which would create all kinds of hypocrisy), Square chose to leave everything ambiguous. One thing the Compilation did was address and answer this repeatedly asked Aesop as an AuthorsSavingThrow.


* Parodied in one episode of ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitans'', where Robin argues that the moral is that too much TV is bad for you since the villain of the week used television to attack them. However Starfire points out that this can't be correct since Beast Boy's knowledge of TV conventions was the only thing that allowed the Titans to defeat said villain. This causes the other Titans to decide that there ''wasn't'' a moral, with Cyborg cheerfully declaring, "It was all completely meaningless."

to:

* Parodied in one episode of ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitans'', where Robin argues that the moral is that too much TV is bad for you since the villain of the week used television to attack them. However Starfire points out that this can't be correct since Beast Boy's knowledge of TV conventions was the only thing that allowed the Titans to defeat said villain. This causes the other Titans to decide that there ''wasn't'' a moral, with Cyborg cheerfully declaring, "It was all completely meaningless."" Ironically, the episode has a valid aesop about properly expressing one's love for their hobby: Both Control Freak and Beast Boy are knowledgeable in pop culture from watching TV, but BB uses his knowledge to help and save the day from the threat CF posed with his knowledge.


* Creator/JonBois lampshades this in his video "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F9H9LwGmc-0 The Search for the Saddest Punt in the World]]", a listing of various times in football where a team should clearly have tried to advance the ball or gone for a field goal rather than punting. He spends most of the video explaining these instances as a cautionary tale, where players were so cowardly that they GaveUpTooSoon and snatched defeat from the jaws of victory... then, at the end, he reveals that, of the ten instances listed, six ended in victory for the punters, one was a tie, and of the three that lost, one followed up that game with a lengthy winning streak, including a Super Bowl. He concludes that he has no idea what he's trying to say.

to:

* Creator/JonBois lampshades this in his video "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F9H9LwGmc-0 The Search for the Saddest Punt in the World]]", a listing of various times in football where a team should clearly have tried to advance the ball or gone for a field goal rather than punting. He spends most of the video explaining these instances as a cautionary tale, where players were so cowardly that they GaveUpTooSoon and snatched defeat from the jaws of victory...victory, proclaiming that "this is what losing teams do"... then, at the end, he reveals that, of the ten instances listed, six ended in victory for the punters, one was a tie, and of the three that lost, one followed up that game with a lengthy winning streak, including a Super Bowl. He concludes that he has no idea what he's trying to say.


* Creator/JonBois lampshades this in his video "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F9H9LwGmc-0 The Search for the Saddest Punt in the World]]", a listing of various times in football where a team should clearly have tried to advance the ball or gone for a field goal rather than punting. He spends most of the video explaining these instances as a cautionary tale, where players were so cowardly that they GaveUpTooSoon and snatched defeat from the jaws of victory... then, at the end, he reveals that, of the ten instances listed, seven ended in victory for the punters, and of the three that lost, one followed up that game with a lengthy winning streak. He concludes that he has no idea what he's trying to say.

to:

* Creator/JonBois lampshades this in his video "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F9H9LwGmc-0 The Search for the Saddest Punt in the World]]", a listing of various times in football where a team should clearly have tried to advance the ball or gone for a field goal rather than punting. He spends most of the video explaining these instances as a cautionary tale, where players were so cowardly that they GaveUpTooSoon and snatched defeat from the jaws of victory... then, at the end, he reveals that, of the ten instances listed, seven six ended in victory for the punters, one was a tie, and of the three that lost, one followed up that game with a lengthy winning streak.streak, including a Super Bowl. He concludes that he has no idea what he's trying to say.

Added DiffLines:

* Creator/JonBois lampshades this in his video "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F9H9LwGmc-0 The Search for the Saddest Punt in the World]]", a listing of various times in football where a team should clearly have tried to advance the ball or gone for a field goal rather than punting. He spends most of the video explaining these instances as a cautionary tale, where players were so cowardly that they GaveUpTooSoon and snatched defeat from the jaws of victory... then, at the end, he reveals that, of the ten instances listed, seven ended in victory for the punters, and of the three that lost, one followed up that game with a lengthy winning streak. He concludes that he has no idea what he's trying to say.


* In the picture book ''The Girl Who Never Made Mistakes'', a girl named Beatrice is famous for [[TheAce never making any mistakes]] until one day she trips and drops some eggs but doesn't count that as her first mistake because she didn't break them (never mind that she didn't ''mean'' to trip), but it still worries her and when she makes a mistake at a talent show, she stops being concerned and joins in her brother Carl at making what the author ''calls'' "mistakes" but it's more like intentional [[CloudCuckoolander wackiness]]. Is the moral to just accept that nobody's perfect? But don't you have a right to worry if you truly didn't make mistakes up until then because making mistakes isn't normal for you? And besides, she seemed perfectly happy until the egg incident. It could be not to pressure kids by telling them they don't make mistakes...but not many people actually do that and they weren't pressuring; they were observing. Perhaps it doesn't have a moral, but it still somehow feels like it's meant to have one.

to:

* In the picture book ''The Girl Who Never Made Mistakes'', ''Literature/TheGirlWhoNeverMadeMistakes'', a girl named Beatrice is famous for [[TheAce never making any mistakes]] until one day she trips and drops some eggs but doesn't count that as her first mistake because she didn't break them (never mind that she didn't ''mean'' to trip), but it still worries her and when she makes a mistake at a talent show, she stops being concerned and joins in her brother Carl at making what the author ''calls'' "mistakes" but it's more like intentional [[CloudCuckoolander wackiness]]. Is the moral to just accept that nobody's perfect? But don't you have a right to worry if you truly didn't make mistakes up until then because making mistakes isn't normal for you? And besides, she seemed perfectly happy until the egg incident. It could be not to pressure kids by telling them they don't make mistakes...but not many people actually do that and they weren't pressuring; they were observing. Perhaps it doesn't have a moral, but it still somehow feels like it's meant to have one.


** The comic's Aesop is actually a condemnation of Chosen One plots in superhero fiction: "Just because you gained great powers in an accident, it does not mean you have some great destiny." It recognizes the unfortunate implications of such stories, because the flip side of that is that people who died or were crippled in accidents were destined to have bad things happen to them. In short, it is an Anti-Nihilist tract about shit happens for no reason, and people try to find a reason.

to:

** The comic's Aesop is actually a condemnation of [[TheChosenOne Chosen One One]] plots in superhero fiction: "Just because you gained great powers in an accident, it does not mean you have some great destiny." It recognizes the unfortunate implications UnfortunateImplications of such stories, because the flip side of that is that people who died or were crippled in accidents were destined to have bad things happen to them. In short, it is an Anti-Nihilist tract about shit happens for no reason, and people try to find a reason.


** The comic's Aesop is actually a condemnation of Chosen One plots in superhero fiction: "Just because you gained great powers in an accident, it does not mean you have some great destiny." It recognizes the unfortunate implications of such stories, because the flip side of that is that people who died or were crippled in accidents were destined to die. In short, it is an Anti-Nihilist tract about shit happens for no reason, and people try to find a reason.

to:

** The comic's Aesop is actually a condemnation of Chosen One plots in superhero fiction: "Just because you gained great powers in an accident, it does not mean you have some great destiny." It recognizes the unfortunate implications of such stories, because the flip side of that is that people who died or were crippled in accidents were destined to die.have bad things happen to them. In short, it is an Anti-Nihilist tract about shit happens for no reason, and people try to find a reason.

Added DiffLines:

** The comic's Aesop is actually a condemnation of Chosen One plots in superhero fiction: "Just because you gained great powers in an accident, it does not mean you have some great destiny." It recognizes the unfortunate implications of such stories, because the flip side of that is that people who died or were crippled in accidents were destined to die. In short, it is an Anti-Nihilist tract about shit happens for no reason, and people try to find a reason.


** "Bats!" starts with a simple enough issue of a fruit bat infestation that is threatening Applejack's crop and boils down to Applejack's argument of "get rid of them because they're a threat" against Fluttershy's argument of "but they're living creatures and can help in the long run", setting up an apparent argument of necessity vs. animal rights. Then Twilight Sparkle decides to TakeAThirdOption, [[NiceJobBreakingItHero causes much more damage by accidentally transforming Fluttershy into a vampire bat pony]], and somehow this wins over Applejack and they set up a reserve on the farm for the fruit bats. The initial conflict is never addressed and it instead ends on the message of "you shouldn't let anypony pressure you into doing something that you don't think is right and sometimes you have to tell even your closest friends 'no'" which wasn't even portrayed in the episode: Fluttershy spent the entire episode pressuring the others to do things they didn't think were right and refusing to take no for an answer and was portrayed as being in the right for it, while if Applejack had just told Fluttershy to shut her hole and driven the bats away as she wanted to do [[CouldHaveAvoidedThisPlot everything would have worked out better for her]].

to:

** "Bats!" starts with a simple enough issue of a fruit bat infestation that is threatening Applejack's crop and boils down to Applejack's argument of "get rid of them because they're a threat" against Fluttershy's argument of "but they're living creatures and can help in the long run", setting up an apparent argument of necessity vs. animal rights. Then Twilight Sparkle decides to TakeAThirdOption, [[NiceJobBreakingItHero causes much more damage by accidentally transforming Fluttershy into a vampire bat pony]], and somehow this wins over Applejack and they set up a reserve on the farm for the fruit bats. The initial conflict is never addressed and it instead ends on the message of "you shouldn't let anypony pressure you into doing something that you don't think is right and sometimes you have to tell even your closest friends 'no'" which wasn't even portrayed in the episode: Fluttershy spent the entire episode pressuring the others to do things they didn't think were right and refusing to take no for an answer and was portrayed as being in the right for it, while if Applejack had just told Fluttershy to shut her hole and driven the bats away as she wanted to do [[CouldHaveAvoidedThisPlot everything would have worked out better for her]].it.


* ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'': Throughout the two-part episode "The Best of Both Worlds", Riker learns he has to be his own man if he wants to become a captain, which he does, succeeding in both saving Picard and beating the Borg, but after this episode, [[SnapBack he goes back to being a Commander and second-in-command]] of the ''Enterprise'', not having his own command again until ''Film/StarTrekNemesis''. And it's even worse when you consider the Expanded Universe which had [[TheRival Commander Shelby]] becoming a captain ''before'' him. Particularly egregious given that Riker had been formally promoted, not merely made an "Acting Captain"... and it had already been established that [[Film/StarTrekVTheFinalFrontier there's no rule against a ship's captain and first officer simultaneously holding the rank of Captain]].
** It's stated many times that Riker can have his choice of command, but he only wants one ship. It's not until ''Nemesis'' that he finally decides that he's never going to get the ''Enterprise'' and should stick with the ''Titan'' instead.

to:

* ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'': ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'':
**
Throughout the two-part episode "The Best of Both Worlds", Riker learns he has to be his own man if he wants to become a captain, which he does, succeeding in both saving Picard and beating the Borg, but after this episode, [[SnapBack he goes back to being a Commander and second-in-command]] of the ''Enterprise'', not having his own command again until ''Film/StarTrekNemesis''. And it's even worse when you consider the Expanded Universe which had [[TheRival Commander Shelby]] becoming a captain ''before'' him. Particularly egregious given that Riker had been formally promoted, not merely made an "Acting Captain"... and it had already been established that [[Film/StarTrekVTheFinalFrontier there's no rule against a ship's captain and first officer simultaneously holding the rank of Captain]].
** It's
Captain]]. Then again, it's stated many times that Riker can have his choice of command, but he only wants one ship. It's not until ''Nemesis'' that he finally decides that he's never going to get the ''Enterprise'' and should stick with the ''Titan'' instead.instead.
** The premise of "Ethics" is about Worf getting paralysed from an accident in the cargo bay (something falling on him). He wants to be euthanized since culturally, Klingons (his species) euthanize people with serious injuries since they consider the injuries a dishonour. Picard, somewhat unusually, supports this, but Dr. Crusher doesn't and would rather try to cure him but has no idea how. Another scientist suggests an experimental procedure but Crusher finds it too risky. However, the other scientist does the procedure and Worf recovers. It feels like there should be an Aesop (or possibly several) in there somewhere because most ''Star Trek'' episodes that focus on ethical concerns and/or serious topics like euthanasia tend to have them, however, it's unclear who you're meant to side with, or even if none or all of them are right. After all, the viewers clearly don't want Worf to die, but ''Star Trek'' typically does not go by the "ends justify the means" philosophy.


** "Bats!" starts with a simple enough issue of a fruit bat infestation that is threatening Applejack's crop and boils down to Applejack's argument of "get rid of them because they're a threat" against Fluttershy's argument of "but they're living creatures and can help in the long run", setting up an apparent argument of necessity vs. animal rights. Then Twilight Sparkle decides to TakeAThirdOption, [[NiceJobBreakingItHero causes much more damage by accidentally transforming Fluttershy into a vampire bat pony]], and somehow this wins over Applejack and they set up a reserve on the farm for the fruit bats. The initial conflict is never addressed.

to:

** "Bats!" starts with a simple enough issue of a fruit bat infestation that is threatening Applejack's crop and boils down to Applejack's argument of "get rid of them because they're a threat" against Fluttershy's argument of "but they're living creatures and can help in the long run", setting up an apparent argument of necessity vs. animal rights. Then Twilight Sparkle decides to TakeAThirdOption, [[NiceJobBreakingItHero causes much more damage by accidentally transforming Fluttershy into a vampire bat pony]], and somehow this wins over Applejack and they set up a reserve on the farm for the fruit bats. The initial conflict is never addressed.addressed and it instead ends on the message of "you shouldn't let anypony pressure you into doing something that you don't think is right and sometimes you have to tell even your closest friends 'no'" which wasn't even portrayed in the episode: Fluttershy spent the entire episode pressuring the others to do things they didn't think were right and refusing to take no for an answer and was portrayed as being in the right for it, while if Applejack had just told Fluttershy to shut her hole and driven the bats away as she wanted to do [[CouldHaveAvoidedThisPlot everything would have worked out better for her]].

Showing 15 edit(s) of 388

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report