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* ''Literature/{{City of Bones|1995}}'' by Creator/MarthaWells: Krismen are bio-engineered to be highly resistant to the venom of various desert creatures, as well as immune to heatstroke and most diseases that afflict humans—and also can't be affected by [[spoiler: Wardens' soul reading or the Inhabitants' MindRape]]. However, they can contract infection from bad wounds or from forcing foreign objects into their pouch.

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* In ''Literature/{{Emergence}}'', hominems are immune to any infectious disease that humans can contract. However, they are not immune to food poisoning, as one hominem learns while also learning he's actually a hominem (he'd always thought he was human).

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* Archie in ''WesternAnimation/ClassOfTheTitans'' is descended from Achilles. While he lacks his ancestor's invulnerability, he does exhibit this trope, extending to immunity to supernatural plagues like the ones in Pandora's Box.

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* In ''Literature/{{Renegades}}'', an artifact called the Amulet of Vitality grants the wearer the immunity not only to all diseases, but also poisons and superpowers that mess with the body, such as PowerParasite. After Adrian tatooes its pattern on himself with his PowerOfCreation, he's similarly immune.


* Most humans born on Earth in the ''Franchise/NoonUniverse'' undergo the procedure called "fukamization", which renders them impervious to all diseases and even harmful radiation.

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* Most humans born on Earth in the ''Franchise/NoonUniverse'' ''Literature/NoonUniverse'' undergo the procedure called "fukamization", which renders them impervious to all diseases and even harmful radiation.


Compare STDImmunity and WeWillHavePerfectHealthInTheFuture. May coexist with NighInvulnerable -- in this trope's case, it's the immune system that is invulnerable to viruses and bacterial strains.

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Compare STDImmunity and WeWillHavePerfectHealthInTheFuture. May coexist with NighInvulnerable -- in NighInvulnerable--in this trope's case, it's the immune system that is invulnerable to viruses and bacterial strains.



*** Anti-Paladins, on the other hand, are immune to the ''effects and symptoms'' of diseases, but they can still be ''infected'' and thus act as ''carriers'' to (deliberately) ''spread'' plagues and diseases to others. A prestige class called "[[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast Cancer Mage]]" is designed to [[ExploitedImmunity weaponize a similar immunity]].
** In the 1st Edition, the several monster types were immune to disease, such as hollyphants, shades, and werebears.
*** Undead and Constructs are also immune to disease, for the simple reason that they're not alive.

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*** ** Anti-Paladins, on the other hand, are immune to the ''effects and symptoms'' of diseases, but they can still be ''infected'' and thus act as ''carriers'' to (deliberately) ''spread'' plagues and diseases to others. A prestige class called "[[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast Cancer Mage]]" is designed to [[ExploitedImmunity weaponize a similar immunity]].
** In the 1st Edition, the several monster types were immune to disease, such as hollyphants, shades, and werebears.
*** ** Undead and Constructs are also immune to disease, for the simple reason that they're not alive.


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[[folder:Webcomics]]
* ''Webcomic/TheOrderOfTheStick'': The Crimson Mantle, an artifact created by the Dark One, god of goblinkind, grants his high priest Redcloak immunity to disease (and extended youth). In the print-only prequel ''Recap/StartOfDarkness'', he is the only one in his party unaffected by a disease created by Lirian, a powerful druid, that blocks all spellcasting abilities. Since he retains his powers, he is able to help Xykon turn into a lich; being undead (and therefore also immune to disease) restores Xykon's spellcasting and allows them to break out of Lirian's captivity.

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** Though it's worth mentioning that, according to the in-game codex, they are not immune to everything "at the same time". Basically, they have clusters of unassigned STEM cells (which can turn into any type of cell possible but haven't) in their bodies even during adulthood. So, when they are faced with life-threatening situations, these cells change to counter that (Krogan use this in Bloodpack by beating Vorcha, making them get thicker skins). If a new disease is introduced, these cells make sure that Vorcha are immune, but the number of these clusters is limited and when they are used up, they can't regrow. In other words, the Vorcha immune to Omega plague would have probably died if exposed to a normal deadly disease.

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* According to the unit lore for VideoGame/WarCraft III's Death Knight hero, Paladins are immune to all disease, including the Plague of Undeath that was at the time choking the kingdom of Lordaeron. The terrified common folk became suspicious of the Paladins' seemingly perfect health while wading in so much sickness and death, and shunned and persecuted them, believing that they were actually infected. Some Paladins eventually decided ThenLetMeBeEvil and became Death Knights. Much later in VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft, a quest line involves a Paladin of the Argent Crusade being infected by the Plague, apparently contradicting this.

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* In the ''ComicBook/JudgeDredd'' story "No Future", the four dreaded Dark Judges accidentally ended up in a future Earth populated solely by very technologyically advanced {{Transhuman}}s. Judge Mortis was a bit confused that his [[MakeThemRot rotting touch]] had zero effect on his would-be victim, until the latter explained that their environment protects them from all contagions, including Mortis himself.


* VideoGame/CastlevaniaLordsOfShadow2: Being a vampire cursed with CompleteImmortality, Gabriel Belmont/Dracula is naturally immune to all poisons and diseases, such as when he is exposed to a genetically-engineered virus that turns humans into monsters instantly, he is completely unaffected. There are not even ill effects for drinking their corrupted blood.

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* VideoGame/CastlevaniaLordsOfShadow2: Being a vampire cursed with CompleteImmortality, Gabriel Belmont/Dracula is naturally immune to all poisons and diseases, such as when he is exposed to a genetically-engineered virus [[SyntheticPlague artificially-engineered virus]] that turns humans into monsters instantly, he is completely unaffected. There are not even ill effects for drinking their corrupted blood.

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* VideoGame/CastlevaniaLordsOfShadow2: Being a vampire cursed with CompleteImmortality, Gabriel Belmont/Dracula is naturally immune to all poisons and diseases, such as when he is exposed to a genetically-engineered virus that turns humans into monsters instantly, he is completely unaffected. There are not even ill effects for drinking their corrupted blood.


* Dragons in ''Manga/MissKobayashisDragonMaid'' are immune to all diseases, which is good considering that their massive size often makes personal hygiene a hassle.

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* Dragons in ''Manga/MissKobayashisDragonMaid'' are immune to all diseases, which is good considering that their massive size often makes personal hygiene a hassle. However, this ends up throwing a wrench in Kanna's attempts to pull a CaretakerReversal with Saikawa in her SpinOff.


* This is one of the superhuman, vaguely-[[OurElvesAreBetter elven]] characteristics popularly attributed to [[RoyalBlood the Targaryens]] in ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'', with Daenerys being confident enough of this that she personally tends to people dying of the flux ([[CallARabbitASmeerp i.e. dysentery]]). As to the accuracy of this belief, there are three historical cases related in the books of Targaryens getting ill (Daeron II and his two immediate heirs died in the Great Spring Sickness), [[spoiler:and Dany is displaying mysterious symptoms of ''something'' at the end of ''A Dance with Dragons''.]]

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* This is one of the superhuman, vaguely-[[OurElvesAreBetter elven]] characteristics popularly attributed to [[RoyalBlood the Targaryens]] in ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'', with Daenerys being confident enough of this that she personally tends to people dying of the flux ([[CallARabbitASmeerp i.e. dysentery]]). As to the accuracy of this belief, there are three multiple historical cases related in the books of Targaryens getting ill (Daeron (Princess Maegelle-daughter of Jaehaerys I-died of grayscale, Aegon III of consumption, Viserys II of a unknown illness [Which admittedly may have been poison], Daeron II and his two immediate heirs died in of the Great Spring Sickness), Sickness, and Jaehaerys II-Daenerys' own grandfather-of another unknown illness), [[spoiler:and Dany is displaying mysterious symptoms of ''something'' at the end of ''A Dance with Dragons''.]]

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