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* More or less the premise of ''WesternAnimation/TheBraveLittleToaster''. More or less.

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* More or less the premise of ''WesternAnimation/TheBraveLittleToaster''. More or less.



* Grumps is exactly this to the Bell family in Helen Fox's childrens' novel [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eager_%28novel%29 Eager]].

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* Grumps is exactly this to the Bell family in Helen Fox's childrens' novel [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eager_%28novel%29 Eager]].Eager.]]



** In the short story AllTheTrapsOfEarth, robot servant Richard Daniel was kept around so long the Barringtons even gave him a last name.
** In CemetaryWorld, Elmer was made in the last days of EarthThatWas, and was evacuated with the last humans. He's very good with maintaining and repairing machinery.

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** In the short story AllTheTrapsOfEarth, "All the Traps of Earth", robot servant Richard Daniel was kept around so long the Barringtons even gave him a last name.
** In CemetaryWorld, "CemetaryWorld", Elmer was made in the last days of EarthThatWas, and was evacuated with the last humans. He's very good with maintaining and repairing machinery.

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* In ''C.L.U.T.Z'', a children's book series by Marilyn Z. Wilkes, the titular robot is an older model who gets along better with the young protagonist Rodney. Newer robot models are designed to be efficient, but the older models like C.L.U.T.Z. were programmed to have fun personalities. In the second book C.L.U.T.Z. meets Rodney's grandfather, who remarks delightedly, "A robot with imagination! Just how they used to make them in the old days."

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** Robbie, from the short story of the same name, is a robot babysitter to a little girl. The family tries to junk him, but it becomes apparent that Robbie and the child are much too attached to each other for that to be an option.


* The [[WesternAnimation/TheJetsons Jetsons']] [[RobotMaid robot maid]] Rosie was an antique when they got her, but she's a part of the family now.


* The [[WesternAnimation/TheJetsons Jetsons']] RobotMaid Rosie was an antique when they got her, but she's a part of the family now.

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* The [[WesternAnimation/TheJetsons Jetsons']] RobotMaid [[RobotMaid robot maid]] Rosie was an antique when they got her, but she's a part of the family now.

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* The [[WesternAnimation/TheJetsons Jetsons']] RobotMaid Rosie was an antique when they got her, but she's a part of the family now.


This is often AnAesop (and not even a very hidden one) where the old robot will be shown to have a much more developed (and human-like) personality, while the new models will be more able and better looking but unfeeling. However, it may just be sentimentality -- the character has a relationship with the old robot that a ReplacementGoldfish wouldn't fulfil.

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This is often AnAesop (and not even a very hidden one) where the old robot will be shown to have a much more developed (and human-like) personality, while the new models will be more able and better looking but unfeeling. However, it may just be sentimentality -- the character has a relationship with the old robot that a ReplacementGoldfish wouldn't fulfil. \n If the character believes that AndroidsArePeopleToo, the idea of ''replacing'' a friend or adopted family member with a newer model would probably be unthinkable.


* An episode of ''Series/TheTwilightZone'' features a down-on-his-luck boxer in an age when all boxing is done by prizefighting robots. His old Mark 3 boxer-bot is no match for the new Mark 7s that litter the profession, but darn it, the Mark 3 is ''his'' robot. [[spoiler:When his robot malfunctions, he enters the ring himself pretending to be a robot. This does not end well for him.]] This episode was based on a short story by Richard Matheson, the same story that was loosely adapted into ''Film/RealSteel'' several decades later.

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* An episode of ''Series/TheTwilightZone'' features a down-on-his-luck boxer in an age when all boxing is done by prizefighting robots. His old Mark 3 boxer-bot is no match for the new Mark 7s that litter the profession, but darn it, the Mark 3 is ''his'' robot. [[spoiler:When his robot malfunctions, he enters the ring himself pretending to be a robot. This does not end well for him.]] ]]
**
This episode was based on a short story by Richard Matheson, the same story that was loosely adapted into ''Film/RealSteel'' several decades later.


* Dr. Wakeman of ''WesternAnimation/MyLifeAsATeenageRobot'' keeps [=XJs=] 1-8 around for no other reason than apparent sentimental value.

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* Dr. Wakeman of ''WesternAnimation/MyLifeAsATeenageRobot'' keeps [=XJs=] 1-8 around for no other reason than apparent sentimental value. [[DownplayedTrope On the other hand]], she's pretty insistent that they stay ''off'' most of the time.


* An episode of ''Series/TheTwilightZone'' features a down-on-his-luck boxer in an age when all boxing is done by prizefighting robots. His old Mark 3 boxer-bot is no match for the new Mark 7s that litter the profession, but darn it, the Mark 3 is ''his'' robot. [[spoiler:When his robot malfunctions, he enters the ring himself pretending to be a robot. This does not end well for him.]] This episode was based on a short story by Richard Matheson. The story was later loosely adapted into a film called ''Film/RealSteel''.

to:

* An episode of ''Series/TheTwilightZone'' features a down-on-his-luck boxer in an age when all boxing is done by prizefighting robots. His old Mark 3 boxer-bot is no match for the new Mark 7s that litter the profession, but darn it, the Mark 3 is ''his'' robot. [[spoiler:When his robot malfunctions, he enters the ring himself pretending to be a robot. This does not end well for him.]] This episode was based on a short story by Richard Matheson. The Matheson, the same story that was later loosely adapted into a film called ''Film/RealSteel''.''Film/RealSteel'' several decades later.


* While it isn't touched on much in the games, the ''Mega Man'' series can be seen as an example. In the ''[[VideoGame/MegaMan Classic]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/MegaManX X]]'' series the heroes have to defeat newer and newer models of robots, knowing that they themselves stay the same.

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* While it isn't touched on much in the games, the ''Mega Man'' ''Franchise/MegaMan'' series can be seen as an example. In the ''[[VideoGame/MegaMan ''[[VideoGame/MegaManClassic Classic]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/MegaManX X]]'' series the heroes have to defeat newer and newer models of robots, knowing that they themselves stay the same.


* ''Manga/{{Chobits}}'': Hiroyasu Ueda bought a persocom when he opened his bakery. He fell in love with her, but she then gradually lost all of her memories. He refused to have her repaired in fear that the persocom would completely lose her memories, much less replacing her.
* This comes up in ''Franchise/GhostInTheShell'' a few times. The first season of ''[[Anime/GhostInTheShellStandAloneComplex Stand Alone Complex]]'' has an episode revolving around an old model of gynoid which were still popular because they were easy to customise. Another episode has the CEO of a company use what is essentially a box with four legs as his body, as he likes the old-fashioned style. The manga explains the box isn't that old-fashioned; it requires extremely sophisticated simulated sensation of body in order to avoid insanity due to sensory deprivation. The man just likes to advertise that he gave up his body to the company, so to speak; they sell organs donated by people who prefer cybernetics, which are cheaper and faster to get than cloned organs.



* This comes up in ''Franchise/GhostInTheShell'' a few times. The first season of ''[[Anime/GhostInTheShellStandAloneComplex Stand Alone Complex]]'' has an episode revolving around an old model of gynoid which were still popular because they were easy to customise. Another episode has the CEO of a company use what is essentially a box with four legs as his body, as he likes the old-fashioned style. The manga explains the box isn't that old-fashioned; it requires extremely sophisticated simulated sensation of body in order to avoid insanity due to sensory deprivation. The man just likes to advertise that he gave up his body to the company, so to speak; they sell organs donated by people who prefer cybernetics, which are cheaper and faster to get than cloned organs.
* ''Manga/{{Chobits}}'': Hiroyasu Ueda bought a persocom when he opened his bakery. He fell in love with her, but she then gradually lost her all of her memories. He refused to have her repaired in fear that the persocom would completely lose her memories, much less replacing her.



* Old B.O.B. in ''Film/TheBlackHole''. V.I.N.Cent, another robot of the same model, even gives a pep talk about how their model hadn't been improved -- "You can't improve on perfection, we are the best!"



* This was the plot of ''Film/{{Cherry 2000}}''; the male protagonist accidentally breaks his RobotGirl, and her model's out of production. Instead of getting a new model, he hires an ActionGirl to take him to the abandoned factory in the post-apocalyptic wasteland, so he can find another Cherry-model to install the backup memory chip into.
* In ''Film/IRobot'', only the newer models of robot begin attacking humans. The older models actually fight against the new models briefly due to their un-updated programming.
* ''Film/PacificRim'' has a HumongousMecha example: the heroes' mech, Gipsy Danger, is less advanced and more worn-out than their rivals' mech, Striker Eureka. . . which incidentally makes it perfect for the mission to destroy the creators of the Kaiju.
* In ''Film/RealSteel'', Atom is a previous-generation sparring robot that was stored whole and functional (but uncleaned) in a parts depot. He has different strengths and weaknesses from current top-of-the-line arena fighters, which allows him to survive when facing them. Some of his strengths have nothing to do with being outdated: since he was built as a sparring bot, not a fighter, his body is specifically made to be highly resistant to damage. On the other hand, his physical strength (at least initially) is very low for a robot (also intentional). Basically, he can take a punch but not give one, until Max replaces his arm actuators with stronger ones salvaged from Ambush.



** It goes back to the original Star Wars movie (A New Hope). Before the final attack on the Death Star, an X-Wing mechanic notes to Luke that R2-D2 is looking pretty banged up and asks if he wants a new one. Luke declines.
** ''Literature/TheThrawnTrilogy'' explains that there are advantages to using old droids that haven't had regular memory wipes, such as the fact that Artoo has worked with Luke's X-Wing computer for so long that they practically have a symbiotic relationship and are much more efficient than the standard. There are also disadvantages - the ship's computer has become so idiosyncratic from this that if another computer needs to scan the ship's data, they need Artoo around to translate.
* Old B.O.B. in ''Film/TheBlackHole''. V.I.N.Cent, another robot of the same model, even gives a pep talk about how their model hadn't been improved -- "You can't improve on perfection, we are the best!"
* In ''Film/IRobot'', only the newer models of robot begin attacking humans. The older models actually fight against the new models briefly due to their un-updated programming.
* This was the plot of ''Film/{{Cherry 2000}}''; the male protagonist accidentally breaks his RobotGirl, and her model's out of production. Instead of getting a new model, he hires an ActionGirl to take him to the abandoned factory in the post-apocalyptic wasteland, so he can find another Cherry-model to install the backup memory chip into.
* In ''Film/RealSteel'', Atom is a previous-generation sparring robot that was stored whole and functional (but uncleaned) in a parts depot. He has different strengths and weaknesses from current top-of-the-line arena fighters, which allows him to survive when facing them. Some of his strengths have nothing to do with being outdated: since he was built as a sparring bot, not a fighter, his body is specifically made to be highly resistant to damage. On the other hand, his physical strength (at least initially) is very low for a robot (also intentional). Basically, he can take a punch but not give one, until Max replaces his arm actuators with stronger ones salvaged from Ambush.

to:

** It goes back to the original Star Wars movie (A New Hope).(''Film/ANewHope''). Before the final attack on the Death Star, an X-Wing mechanic notes to Luke that R2-D2 is looking pretty banged up and asks if he wants a new one. Luke declines.
** ''Literature/TheThrawnTrilogy'' explains that there are advantages to using old droids that haven't had regular memory wipes, such as the fact that Artoo has worked with Luke's X-Wing computer for so long that they practically have a symbiotic relationship and are much more efficient than the standard. There are also disadvantages - the ship's computer has become so idiosyncratic from this that if another computer needs to scan the ship's data, they need Artoo around to translate.
* Old B.O.B. in ''Film/TheBlackHole''. V.I.N.Cent, another robot of the same model, even gives a pep talk about how their model hadn't been improved -- "You can't improve on perfection, we are the best!"
* In ''Film/IRobot'', only the newer models of robot begin attacking humans. The older models actually fight against the new models briefly due to their un-updated programming.
* This was the plot of ''Film/{{Cherry 2000}}''; the male protagonist accidentally breaks his RobotGirl, and her model's out of production. Instead of getting a new model, he hires an ActionGirl to take him to the abandoned factory in the post-apocalyptic wasteland, so he can find another Cherry-model to install the backup memory chip into.
* In ''Film/RealSteel'', Atom is a previous-generation sparring robot that was stored whole and functional (but uncleaned) in a parts depot. He has different strengths and weaknesses from current top-of-the-line arena fighters, which allows him to survive when facing them. Some of his strengths have nothing to do with being outdated: since he was built as a sparring bot, not a fighter, his body is specifically made to be highly resistant to damage. On the other hand, his physical strength (at least initially) is very low for a robot (also intentional). Basically, he can take a punch but not give one, until Max replaces his arm actuators with stronger ones salvaged from Ambush.
declines.



* ''Film/PacificRim'' has a HumongousMecha example: the heroes' mech, Gypsy Danger, is less advanced and more worn-out than their rivals' mech, Striker Eureka. . . which incidentally makes it perfect for the mission to destroy the creators of the Kaiju.



** In short story ''Light Verse'', a wealthy socialite and artist refuses to fix her old robot butler, finding his eccentricities charming, [[spoiler:but it turns out that it was the malfunctioning robots who were creating her art]].
* [[http://starwars.wikia.com/wiki/Bollux Bollux]] in ''Literature/TheHanSoloAdventures'' by Creator/BrianDaley. Bollux is actually a slight subversion, as his only real use is as a mobile hiding place for a highly-advanced hacking/data droid, a Trojan Horse if you will.
* In ''VideoGame/StarWarsTheOldRepublic: Fatal Alliance'', the pirate Jet Nebula has a trusty old droid named Clunker with a broken vocoder. The only way he communicates is via an old military code, consisting of hand signals. Jet prefers it that way and thinks Clunker intentionally broke his vocoder (something about "if you didn't reply to an order, then there's no proof you heard it").

to:

** In the short story ''Light Verse'', a wealthy socialite and artist refuses to fix her old robot butler, finding his eccentricities charming, [[spoiler:but it turns out that it was the malfunctioning robots who were creating her art]].
* [[http://starwars.wikia.com/wiki/Bollux Bollux]] in ''Literature/TheHanSoloAdventures'' by Creator/BrianDaley. Bollux Grumps is actually a slight subversion, as his only real use is as a mobile hiding place for a highly-advanced hacking/data droid, a Trojan Horse if you will.
* In ''VideoGame/StarWarsTheOldRepublic: Fatal Alliance'',
exactly this to the pirate Jet Nebula has a trusty old droid named Clunker with a broken vocoder. The only way he communicates is via an old military code, consisting of hand signals. Jet prefers it that way and thinks Clunker intentionally broke his vocoder (something about "if you didn't reply to an order, then there's no proof you heard it").Bell family in Helen Fox's childrens' novel [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eager_%28novel%29 Eager]].



* Grumps is exactly this to the Bell family in Helen Fox's childrens' novel [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eager_%28novel%29 Eager]].

to:

* Grumps ''Franchise/StarWarsLegends'':
** [[http://starwars.wikia.com/wiki/Bollux Bollux]] in ''Literature/TheHanSoloAdventures'' by Creator/BrianDaley. Bollux
is exactly actually a slight subversion, as his only real use is as a mobile hiding place for a highly-advanced hacking/data droid, a Trojan Horse if you will.
** In ''VideoGame/StarWarsTheOldRepublic: Fatal Alliance'', the pirate Jet Nebula has a trusty old droid named Clunker with a broken vocoder. The only way he communicates is via an old military code, consisting of hand signals. Jet prefers it that way and thinks Clunker intentionally broke his vocoder (something about "if you didn't reply to an order, then there's no proof you heard it").
** ''Literature/TheThrawnTrilogy'' explains that there are advantages to using old droids that haven't had regular memory wipes, such as the fact that Artoo has worked with Luke's X-Wing computer for so long that they practically have a symbiotic relationship and are much more efficient than the standard. There are also disadvantages - the ship's computer has become so idiosyncratic from
this that if another computer needs to scan the Bell family in Helen Fox's childrens' novel [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eager_%28novel%29 Eager]].ship's data, they need Artoo around to translate.



* The protagonists of ''Series/AlmostHuman''. Kennex "accidentally" destroys his police-issued MX android (emotionless and efficient) partner, so the department saddles him with "Dorian", a leftover DRN (discontinued for having overly-realistic emotions).
* In ''Series/PowerRangersSPD,'' the robot dog RIC (Robotic Interactive Canine). Run down and broken, with replacement parts long out of production, he was given to making any sound ''but'' dog sounds, and annoyed the Rangers until he [[TakingTheBullet jumped into]] MechaMooks' fire to save Syd. Though she had been first in line to just recycle him before, now Syd couldn't bear to, and got the tech-savvy Bridge and Boom to work on him. The result is a DoAnythingRobot that even turns into a "[=K9=] Cannon" for a FinishingMove... though a lot of fans preferred RIC the way he'd been before!



* In ''Series/PowerRangersSPD,'' the robot dog RIC (Robotic Interactive Canine). Run down and broken, with replacement parts long out of production, he was given to making any sound ''but'' dog sounds, and annoyed the Rangers until he [[TakingTheBullet jumped into]] MechaMooks' fire to save Syd. Though she had been first in line to just recycle him before, now Syd couldn't bear to, and got the tech-savvy Bridge and Boom to work on him. The result is a DoAnythingRobot that even turns into a "[=K9=] Cannon" for a FinishingMove... though a lot of fans preferred RIC the way he'd been before!



* The protagonists of ''Series/AlmostHuman''. Kennex "accidentally" destroys his police-issued MX android (emotionless and efficient) partner, so the department saddles him with "Dorian," a leftover DRN (discontinued for having overly-realistic emotions).



* Helper from ''WesternAnimation/TheVentureBrothers'' is certainly of the money-saving variety. Dr Venture prefers to repair or reuse his father's old tech than invent his own.
* Happens on an episode of ''WesternAnimation/TheJetsons'', when Rosie is apparently outclassed by a later model of robot, and runs away when she sees a salesman giving them the hard sell.
** This trope came up fairly often on the series (particularly the 80s revival), as Rosie is considered a long-obsolete robot model by the Jetsons' future's standards.

to:

* Helper from ''WesternAnimation/TheVentureBrothers'' In ''WesternAnimation/AdventuresOfTheGalaxyRangers'', Zachary's MechanicalHorse Brutus is certainly of the money-saving variety. Dr Venture prefers to repair or reuse his father's old tech than invent his own.
* Happens on an episode of ''WesternAnimation/TheJetsons'', when Rosie is apparently outclassed by
a later significantly older model of robot, than the other three and runs away when she sees a salesman giving them isn't as agile or fast as the hard sell.
** This trope came up fairly often
other three, either. But he ''is'' much sturdier and has more power on the series (particularly the 80s revival), as Rosie is considered a long-obsolete robot model by the Jetsons' future's standards.pushing and pulling loads.



* Happens on an episode of ''WesternAnimation/TheJetsons'', when Rosie is apparently outclassed by a later model of robot, and runs away when she sees a salesman giving them the hard sell.
** This trope came up fairly often on the series (particularly the 80s revival), as Rosie is considered a long-obsolete robot model by the Jetsons' future's standards.



* In ''WesternAnimation/AdventuresOfTheGalaxyRangers'', Zachary's MechanicalHorse Brutus is a significantly older model than the other three and isn't as agile or fast as the other three, either. But he ''is'' much sturdier and has more power on pushing and pulling loads.

to:

* In ''WesternAnimation/AdventuresOfTheGalaxyRangers'', Zachary's MechanicalHorse Brutus ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsRebels'': Chopper is a significantly older model than the other three and isn't as agile or fast as the other three, either. But he ''is'' much sturdier C1 model, which is revealed in season 3 to no longer be manufactured. On top of this, he's somewhat beat-up and has more power on pushing and pulling loads.mismatched legs. He's still a valued member of the ''Ghost'' crew.


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* Helper from ''WesternAnimation/TheVentureBrothers'' is certainly of the money-saving variety. Dr Venture prefers to repair or reuse his father's old tech than invent his own.


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* ''Film/PacificRim'' has a HumongousMecha example: the heroes' mech, Gypsy Danger, is less advanced and more worn-out than their rivals' mech, Striker Eureka. . . which incidentally makes it perfect for the mission to destroy the creators of the Kaiju.


* [[http://starwars.wikia.com/wiki/Bollux Bollux]] in the ''Franchise/StarWars'' ''Han Solo Adventures" trilogy by Brian Daley.
** Bollux is actually a slight subversion, as his only real use is as a mobile hiding place for a highly-advanced hacking/data droid, a Trojan Horse if you will.

to:

* [[http://starwars.wikia.com/wiki/Bollux Bollux]] in the ''Franchise/StarWars'' ''Han Solo Adventures" trilogy ''Literature/TheHanSoloAdventures'' by Brian Daley.
**
Creator/BrianDaley. Bollux is actually a slight subversion, as his only real use is as a mobile hiding place for a highly-advanced hacking/data droid, a Trojan Horse if you will.


[[folder:Films -- Animated]]
* More or less the premise of ''WesternAnimation/TheBraveLittleToaster''. More or less.
* Carl from ''Disney/MeetTheRobinsons'' is the lowest tech thing the family has, apparently built when Lewis was just a kid. His son inherits it.
[[/folder]]



* More or less the premise of ''WesternAnimation/TheBraveLittleToaster''. More or less.



* Carl from ''Disney/MeetTheRobinsons'' is the lowest tech thing the family has, apparently built when Lewis was just a kid. His son inherits it.

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