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* The ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls'' episode "[[Recap/GravityFallsS1E9TheTimeTravelersPig The Time Traveler's Pig]]" has quite a few:
** When Dipper and Mabel get back to the present, but are unsure of which timeline they are in, they soon see Wendy holding the stuffed animal Dipper won for her and saying, "This is the best present ever!"
** When Dipper makes a speech to Wendy about how people make mistakes and tight pants are overrated, she tells him, "Dude, you lost me." For her, it just means she's confused, but to Dipper it's a reminder of what he has to sacrifice in order for Mabel to be with Waddles: he's going to ruin his chances with Wendy, and essentially "lose" her to Robbie.


* In ''WesternAnimation/CentralPark'', Season 1 "[[Recap/CentralParkS1E3HatLuncheon Hat Luncheon]]", when Helen meets a former maid named Lucy who inherited everything from her previous employer, Lucy gives Helen advice on waiting to inherit's Bitsy's fortune by telling her "Where there's a will, there's way", and then tells her to make sure she's in Bitsy's will. The phrase means to have determination to overcome a difficult obstacle, which Helen is going to need if she continues to be Bitsy's assistant, and if Bitsy has a will then there's a way to inherit everything from her. The double meaning is used again in Helen's VillainSong "If There's a Will".

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* In ''WesternAnimation/CentralPark'', Season 1 "[[Recap/CentralParkS1E3HatLuncheon Hat Luncheon]]", when Helen meets a former maid named Lucy who inherited everything from her previous employer, Lucy gives Helen advice on waiting to inherit's Bitsy's fortune by telling her "Where there's a will, there's way", and then tells whispers to her to make sure she's in Bitsy's will. The phrase means to have determination to overcome a difficult obstacle, which Helen is going to need if she continues to be Bitsy's assistant, and if Bitsy has a will then there's a way to inherit everything from her. The double meaning is used again in Helen's VillainSong "If There's a Will".

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[[folder:Western Animation]]
* In ''WesternAnimation/CentralPark'', Season 1 "[[Recap/CentralParkS1E3HatLuncheon Hat Luncheon]]", when Helen meets a former maid named Lucy who inherited everything from her previous employer, Lucy gives Helen advice on waiting to inherit's Bitsy's fortune by telling her "Where there's a will, there's way", and then tells her to make sure she's in Bitsy's will. The phrase means to have determination to overcome a difficult obstacle, which Helen is going to need if she continues to be Bitsy's assistant, and if Bitsy has a will then there's a way to inherit everything from her. The double meaning is used again in Helen's VillainSong "If There's a Will".
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* ''Theatre/WesterosAnAmericanMusical'': At some point, plans are made to use a hairnet to smuggle a small item into an event without the person actually wearing the hairnet being aware of it. As the female character meant to wear the hairnet recieves it at is asked to wear it at the event in question, the orchestrator of the smuggling says "That hairnet is meant to go over her head"; it can be read both as an idiosyncratic way of saying "on her head" and an allusion to the fact that the wearer must ''not'' know about the smuggled item.

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* ''Theatre/WesterosAnAmericanMusical'': At some point, plans are made to use a hairnet to smuggle a small item into an event without the person actually wearing the hairnet being aware of it. As the female character meant to wear the hairnet recieves it at is asked to wear it at the event in question, the orchestrator of the smuggling says "That hairnet is meant to go over her head"; it can be read both as an idiosyncratic way of saying "on her head" and an allusion to the fact that the wearer must ''not'' know about the smuggled item.have no idea that she's being used as a smuggler.

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* ''Theatre/WesterosAnAmericanMusical'': At some point, plans are made to use a hairnet to smuggle a small item into an event without the person actually wearing the hairnet being aware of it. As the female character meant to wear the hairnet recieves it at is asked to wear it at the event in question, the orchestrator of the smuggling says "That hairnet is meant to go over her head"; it can be read both as an idiosyncratic way of saying "on her head" and an allusion to the fact that the wearer must ''not'' know about the smuggled item.


* ''Literature/TheFoundationTrilogy'': A deliberate InUniverse version is when Hari Seldon admits during ''Literature/{{Foundation}}'' that he created two Foundations at opposite ends of the galaxy; one at a [[MetalPoorPlanet remote backwater]] planet called Terminus, and the other at Star's End. During ''Literature/FoundationAndEmpire'', characters start trying to discover the location of the Second Foundation that Hari Seldon keeps mentioning. In ''Literature/SecondFoundation'', characters use "the other end of the galaxy" as a clue. Some are doing it spatially (i.e. a planet on the opposite edge of the galaxy), others temporally (i.e. Terminus was the last planet to be settled by that point; by that logic, the Second Foundation must be on the first planet EarthThatWas). The real answer turns out to be Trantor, the former capital of The Empire as the socially opposite planet. Some of these were deliberately misled by the Second Foundation in order to maintain their secrecy. [[spoiler:Hari Seldon meant Trantor, which, was at the galactic core (at one end of the galactic arm which included most human worlds), and was the sociological opposite of Terminus (the centre of galactic business versus a remote backwater).]]

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* ''Literature/TheFoundationTrilogy'': A deliberate InUniverse version is when Hari Seldon admits during ''Literature/{{Foundation}}'' ''Literature/Foundation1951'' that he created two Foundations at opposite 'opposite ends of the galaxy; galaxy'; one at a [[MetalPoorPlanet remote backwater]] planet at the edge of the galactic arms called Terminus, and the other at Star's End. During ''Literature/FoundationAndEmpire'', characters start trying to discover the location of the Second Foundation that Hari Seldon keeps mentioning. In ''Literature/SecondFoundation'', characters use "the 'the other end of the galaxy" galaxy' as a clue. Some are doing it spatially (i.e. a planet on the opposite edge of the galaxy), others temporally (i.e. Terminus was the last planet to be settled by that point; by that logic, the Second Foundation must be on the first planet -- EarthThatWas). The real answer turns out to be Trantor, the former capital of The Empire as the socially opposite planet. Some of these suggestions were deliberately misled misleading ideas by the Second Foundation in order to maintain their secrecy. [[spoiler:Hari Seldon meant Trantor, which, whose [[IstanbulNotConstantinople archaic nickname was Star's End]], was at the galactic core (at one end of (in a spiral, the galactic arm which included most human worlds), opposite ends are the centre and the far arms), and was the sociological opposite of Terminus (the centre of galactic business business/government versus a remote backwater).]]


* The English dub of ''Anime/PokemonTheMovie2000'' has an ancient prophecy which states that if the balance between Articuno, Zapdos, and Moltres is disrupted, "The earth shall turn to Ash". It is initially believed that the prophecy fortells TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt, but the heroes realize that there is [[ProphecyTwist another way the prophecy could be interpreted]]: that if the world was imperiled, it would turn to someone named Ash for salvation -- someone like [[TheChosenOne Ash Ketchum]].

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* The English dub of ''Anime/PokemonTheMovie2000'' ''Anime/Pokemon2000'' has an ancient prophecy which states that if the balance between Articuno, Zapdos, and Moltres is disrupted, "The earth shall turn to Ash". It is initially believed that the prophecy fortells TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt, but the heroes realize that there is [[ProphecyTwist another way the prophecy could be interpreted]]: that if the world was imperiled, it would turn to someone named Ash for salvation -- someone like [[TheChosenOne Ash Ketchum]].

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* The English dub of ''Anime/PokemonTheMovie2000'' has an ancient prophecy which states that if the balance between Articuno, Zapdos, and Moltres is disrupted, "The earth shall turn to Ash". It is initially believed that the prophecy fortells TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt, but the heroes realize that there is [[ProphecyTwist another way the prophecy could be interpreted]]: that if the world was imperiled, it would turn to someone named Ash for salvation -- someone like [[TheChosenOne Ash Ketchum]].


* ''Literature/TheFoundationTrilogy'': A deliberate InUniverse version is when Hari Seldon admits during ''Literature/{{Foundation}}'' that he created two Foundations at opposite ends of the galaxy; one at a [[MetalPoorPlanet remote backwater]] planet called Terminus, and the other at Star's End. During ''Literature/FoundationAndEmpire'', characters start trying to discover the location of the Second Foundation that Hari Seldon keeps mentioning. In ''Literature/SecondFoundation'', characters use "the other end of the galaxy" as a clue. Some are doing it spatially (i.e. a planet on the opposite edge of the galaxy), others temporally (i.e. Terminus was the last planet to be settled by that point; by that logic, the Second Foundation must be on the first planet EarthThatWas). The real answer turns out to be Trantor, the former capital of The Empire as the socially opposite planet. Some of these were deliberately misled by the Second Foundation in order to maintain their secrecy. [[spoiler:Hari Seldon meant Trantor, whose [[IstanbulNotConstantinople archaic name was Star's End]], was at the galactic core (in a spiral, the opposite ends are the centre and the edge), and was the sociological opposite of Terminus (the centre of galactic business versus a remote backwater).]]

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* ''Literature/TheFoundationTrilogy'': A deliberate InUniverse version is when Hari Seldon admits during ''Literature/{{Foundation}}'' that he created two Foundations at opposite ends of the galaxy; one at a [[MetalPoorPlanet remote backwater]] planet called Terminus, and the other at Star's End. During ''Literature/FoundationAndEmpire'', characters start trying to discover the location of the Second Foundation that Hari Seldon keeps mentioning. In ''Literature/SecondFoundation'', characters use "the other end of the galaxy" as a clue. Some are doing it spatially (i.e. a planet on the opposite edge of the galaxy), others temporally (i.e. Terminus was the last planet to be settled by that point; by that logic, the Second Foundation must be on the first planet EarthThatWas). The real answer turns out to be Trantor, the former capital of The Empire as the socially opposite planet. Some of these were deliberately misled by the Second Foundation in order to maintain their secrecy. [[spoiler:Hari Seldon meant Trantor, whose [[IstanbulNotConstantinople archaic name was Star's End]], which, was at the galactic core (in a spiral, (at one end of the opposite ends are the centre and the edge), galactic arm which included most human worlds), and was the sociological opposite of Terminus (the centre of galactic business versus a remote backwater).]]


* ''Literature/TheFoundationTrilogy'': A deliberate InUniverse version is when Hari Seldon admits during ''Literature/Foundation1951'' that he created two Foundations at opposite ends of the galaxy; one at a [[MetalPoorPlanet remote backwater]] planet called Terminus, and the other at Star's End. During ''Literature/FoundationAndEmpire'', characters start trying to discover the location of the Second Foundation that Hari Seldon keeps mentioning. In ''Literature/SecondFoundation'', characters use "the other end of the galaxy" as a clue. Some are doing it spatially (i.e. a planet on the opposite edge of the galaxy), others temporally (i.e. Terminus was the last planet to be settled by that point; by that logic, the Second Foundation must be on the first planet EarthThatWas). The real answer turns out to be Trantor, the former capital of The Empire as the socially opposite planet. Some of these were deliberately misled by the Second Foundation in order to maintain their secrecy. [[spoiler:Hari Seldon meant Trantor, whose [[IstanbulNotConstantinople archaic name was Star's End]], was at the galactic core (in a spiral, the opposite ends are the centre and the edge), and was the sociological opposite of Terminus (the centre of galactic business versus a remote backwater).]]

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* ''Literature/TheFoundationTrilogy'': A deliberate InUniverse version is when Hari Seldon admits during ''Literature/Foundation1951'' ''Literature/{{Foundation}}'' that he created two Foundations at opposite ends of the galaxy; one at a [[MetalPoorPlanet remote backwater]] planet called Terminus, and the other at Star's End. During ''Literature/FoundationAndEmpire'', characters start trying to discover the location of the Second Foundation that Hari Seldon keeps mentioning. In ''Literature/SecondFoundation'', characters use "the other end of the galaxy" as a clue. Some are doing it spatially (i.e. a planet on the opposite edge of the galaxy), others temporally (i.e. Terminus was the last planet to be settled by that point; by that logic, the Second Foundation must be on the first planet EarthThatWas). The real answer turns out to be Trantor, the former capital of The Empire as the socially opposite planet. Some of these were deliberately misled by the Second Foundation in order to maintain their secrecy. [[spoiler:Hari Seldon meant Trantor, whose [[IstanbulNotConstantinople archaic name was Star's End]], was at the galactic core (in a spiral, the opposite ends are the centre and the edge), and was the sociological opposite of Terminus (the centre of galactic business versus a remote backwater).]]



[[folder:Films -- Animation]]
* In ''WesternAnimation/{{Brave}}'', to undo a spell, the witch tells Merida that she and her mother must mend what was torn by pride. Merida assumes this means a tapestry she slashed open during a fight between her and her mother; however, it's left ambiguous whether the witch really meant the tapestry or the relationship between Merida and her mother.


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[[folder:Films -- Animation]]
* In ''WesternAnimation/{{Brave}}'', to undo a spell, the witch tells Merida that she and her mother must mend what was torn by pride. Merida assumes this means a tapestry she slashed open during a fight between her and her mother; however, it's left ambiguous whether the witch really meant the tapestry or the relationship between Merida and her mother.
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[[folder:Jokes]]
* There is this geek joke with the physicist highwayman and "This is a Poynting vector" (shows gun) "- don't let it become a Killing vector!" Belongs under "Pun", of course, but there is a SF story where the double meaning of "Killing vector" is weapunized with definitely no pun intended to sent the baddies, who don't get it, into certain black hole death.


* The image of a blue-and-yellow-striped tiger became this in WW2 Sweden, although less to ''conceal'' a message than to make it more memorable -- the phrase "En Svensk Tiger" can mean either "A Swedish Tiger" or "A Swede Keeps Silent", so a tiger in the colours of Sweden was used in loose-lips-sink-ships campaigns.

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* The image of a blue-and-yellow-striped tiger became this in WW2 UsefulNotes/WorldWarII Sweden, although less to ''conceal'' a message than to make it more memorable -- the phrase "En Svensk Tiger" can mean either "A Swedish Tiger" or "A Swede Keeps Silent", so a tiger in the colours of Sweden was used in loose-lips-sink-ships campaigns.

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* CodeEmergency

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* The image of a blue-and-yellow-striped tiger became this in WW2 Sweden, although less to ''conceal'' a message than to make it more memorable -- the phrase "En Svensk Tiger" can mean either "A Swedish Tiger" or "A Swede Keeps Silent", so a tiger in the colours of Sweden was used in loose-lips-sink-ships campaigns.

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