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** Similarly, the Ted Hughes novel ''The Iron Man'' had its setting changed from [[TheSixties 1968]] England to [[TheFifties 1957]] America when adapted into ''WesternAnimation/TheIronGiant''.


* Brazilian dubs also put their spin on Dixie accents, by dubbing them with a Caipira (countryside parts of São Paulo state) accent.

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* Brazilian dubs also put their spin on Dixie accents, by dubbing them with a Caipira (countryside (rural parts of states like São Paulo state) Paulo, Minas Gerais and Goiás) accent.


* The Brazilian dub of ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague'', for that matter, has one tiny bit in the episode "The Great Brain Robbery": when Grodd, not convinced by Flash's attempts to affirm he is Lex Luthor, [[AndImTheQueenOfSheba sarcastically remarks]] he is Creator/CharltonHeston, the dub replaces Heston's name with "Franchise/KingKong", which would be easier for kids who hadn't seen Heston's films to get.

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* The Brazilian dub of ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague'', for that matter, ''[[WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague Justice League Unlimited]]'' has one tiny bit in the episode "The Great Brain Robbery": when Grodd, not convinced by Flash's attempts to affirm he is Lex Luthor, [[AndImTheQueenOfSheba sarcastically remarks]] he is Creator/CharltonHeston, the dub replaces Heston's name with "Franchise/KingKong", which would be easier for kids who hadn't seen Heston's films to get.

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** In ''Shrek 2'', the Brazilian dub changed the reference to Music/ShirleyBassey (when Donkey says that a bush looks like her), mentioning the Brazilian singer Fafá de Belém instead. It also changed the reason why the bush resembles the singer: in Bassey's case, it's the arms pose; in Fafá's case, it's the [[MostCommonSuperpower bust size]].


* A bad example of this are the recent Italian translations of the old ''Magazine/{{Mad}}'' comics from the fifties. What happens is that you get American comics from 70 years ago filled with contemporary Italian pop culture.
** Mad even does this among different English versions. Their parody of ''Film/ReturnOfTheJedi'' had Leia offering the Ewoks, "the candy of outer space creatures"- [[Film/ETTheExtraTerrestrial Reese's Pieces]]. The UK/Irish version replaces it with [[Series/DoctorWho Jelly Babies]].


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[[folder:Magazines]]
* ''Magazine/{{MAD}}''
** Their parody of ''Film/ReturnOfTheJedi'' had Leia offering the Ewoks, "the candy of outer space creatures"- [[Film/ETTheExtraTerrestrial Reese's Pieces]]. The UK/Irish version replaces it with [[Series/DoctorWho Jelly Babies]].
** In a bad execution of this trope, a collection of ''[=MAD=]'' comics from the early 40's-50's released in Italy in 2008-2009 replaced many of the references... but not in a way that makes sense, meaning that the readers got comics clearly made in the US ages ago that contain multiple references to Italian celebrities and politicians [[AnachronismStew from 60 years later]].
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* In non-English versions of ''WesternAnimation/MonstersUniversity'', the "BE MY PAL" cupcakes are changed into smiley face cupcakes, removing the resulting joke where they are smoshed together to spell the word "LAME".


* This happens a lot in the Disney-distributed English dubs of ''Creator/StudioGhibli'' movies:

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* This happens a lot in the Disney-distributed English dubs of ''Creator/StudioGhibli'' movies:movies. In fact, they heavily encouraged the various screenwriters to take liberties in translation but made sure it was written into the contract that the animation itself couldn’t be touched :


* The Asterix books also convey the humour Parisian French speakers gain from the weird way French is spoken in places like belgium and Switzerland, and especially from dialect French spoken outside Paris. In ''Asterix and Cleopatra", people from the South kingdom of Egypt are depicted as speaking in exaggerated Southern French accents - the languedocois dialect of the south-west is heavily parodied. This posed as problem for the British translation, which kept the theme of bucolic country folk from a long way away coming to the sophisticated metropolis; they were given parody UsefulNotes/TheWestCountry accents, from a south-western region thought of by the rest of Britain as yokel farming country.



* In 1992, Creator/DouglasAdams wrote to an American editor working on the comic book adaptation of ''Literature/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy1'' pointing out how ridiculous the endeavor to Americanize it was, showing every bit of his signature wit:

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* In 1992, Creator/DouglasAdams wrote to an American editor working on the comic book adaptation of ''Literature/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy1'' ''Literature/TheHitchHikersGuideToTheGalaxy'' pointing out how ridiculous the endeavor endeavour to Americanize it was, showing every bit of his signature wit:


** In Italy, an old translation of Marvel comics renamed Nightcrawler as "Lombrico" (Worm). The funny thing is that "nightcrawler" is an American word for a type of worm, so it is actually a literal (if somewhat offensive) translation. Namor the Sub-Mariner lost his nickname for years, because no translation was fitting.
** When the X-Men comics were first published in Finland in the 1980s, most of the character names were translated literally if they had cool-sounding Finnish equivalents, such as with Cyclops ("Kyklooppi") or Colossus ("Kolossi"). However, with some other names they came up with rather unusual localizations. Nightcrawler became "Painajainen" ("Nightmare"), possibly because the translator didn't know what a "nightcrawler" was, and thought it had something to do with nightmares. The name of the villain "Arcade" would literally translate to "game hall", which obviously isn't a good name for character... So he became, rather inexplicably, "Armoton" ("Merciless"), which has little do with the original English name, except that both words begin with ''Ar-''. As for the ComicBook/XFactor villain Apocalypse, the translator was under the impression that the word "apocalypse" translates to "The Book of Revelations", and he didn't want the villain to be called a "book", so he was given the much more generic name "Tuho" ("Destruction").
** In Brazil, Rogue is called "Vampira" (the female form of ''vampire''), somewhat fitting with her power-sucking mutant ability.

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** * In Italy, an old translation of Marvel comics renamed Nightcrawler as "Lombrico" (Worm). The funny thing is that "nightcrawler" is an American word for a type of worm, so it is actually a literal (if somewhat offensive) translation. Namor the Sub-Mariner lost his nickname for years, because no translation was fitting.
** * When the X-Men comics were first published in Finland in the 1980s, most of the character names were translated literally if they had cool-sounding Finnish equivalents, such as with Cyclops ("Kyklooppi") or Colossus ("Kolossi"). However, with some other names they came up with rather unusual localizations. Nightcrawler became "Painajainen" ("Nightmare"), possibly because the translator didn't know what a "nightcrawler" was, and thought it had something to do with nightmares. The name of the villain "Arcade" would literally translate to "game hall", which obviously isn't a good name for character... So he became, rather inexplicably, "Armoton" ("Merciless"), which has little do with the original English name, except that both words begin with ''Ar-''. As for the ComicBook/XFactor villain Apocalypse, the translator was under the impression that the word "apocalypse" translates to "The Book of Revelations", and he didn't want the villain to be called a "book", so he was given the much more generic name "Tuho" ("Destruction").
** * In Brazil, Rogue ComicBook/{{Rogue}} is called "Vampira" (the female form of ''vampire''), somewhat fitting with her power-sucking mutant ability.


** The Czech translator of ''Literature/TheTruth'' was given a different problem. Vampire Otto Chriek, in-universe, comes from a remote Slavonic corner of the Discworld. To reinforce this, in a moment of great stress he is given a long heartfelt expletive to shriek in his native language. In the English version, ''Bodrovaskie Zheijet!'' is a meaningless piece of cod-Slavic. The translator's problem lay in making this meaningful in a Slavonic language. Did he replace it with a real swear word? Did he fudge around it? In the end, for a Czech market, he wrote Otto in subtle little ways suggesting he was Russian and left the cod-Slavic exactly as it was in English, reasoning his audience would not be offended and would understand only an uncouth Russian would swear as luridly as that, what could we cultured Czechs expect from Russians?
** And the translator approached to do the Polish version allegedly threw his hands up in horror, declaring that he did not consider it ''possible'' to think like that in Polish.

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** The Czech translator of ''Literature/TheTruth'' was given a different problem. Vampire Otto Chriek, in-universe, comes from a remote Slavonic corner of the Discworld. To reinforce this, in a moment of great stress he is given a long heartfelt expletive to shriek in his native language. In the English version, ''Bodrovaskie Zheijet!'' is a meaningless piece of cod-Slavic. The translator's problem lay in making this meaningful in a Slavonic language. Did he replace it with a real swear word? Did he fudge around it? In the end, for a the Czech market, he wrote Otto in subtle little ways suggesting he was Russian and left the cod-Slavic exactly as it was in English, reasoning his audience would not be offended and would understand only an uncouth Russian would swear as luridly as that, what could we cultured Czechs expect from Russians?
Russians? It must be noted that the Czech translator of ''Literature/TheTruth'' was the Czech translator of the whole series who regularly attended fan meetings, so by that point he probably knew pretty well what to expect from his readers.
** And the translator approached to do the Polish version allegedly threw his hands up in horror, declaring that he did not consider it ''possible'' to think like that in Polish.


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* The Czech translator of Literature/TheHobbit replaced [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caraway_seed_cake seed cakes]], a decidedly British food, with [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kolach ''makové koláče'']], a decidedly Czech food which shares with the original the superficial similarity of being a pastry with seeds.


* Averted in the British Wallander series which is based on the Swedish crime novels written by Henning Mankell. The characters speak English but the series is filmed in Sweden, and it is actually following the books rather well.

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* Averted in the British Wallander ''Series/{{Wallander}}'' series which is based on the Swedish crime novels written by Henning Mankell. The characters speak English but the series is filmed in Sweden, and it is actually following the books rather well.


* The German dub of ''Series/MarriedWithChildren'' had constant references to a (at that time) popular German actor, to the point where the whole German fandom guessed and still is guessing who the heck was supposed to be referenced in the original version.

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* The German dub of ''Series/MarriedWithChildren'' had constant references to a (at that time) popular then-popular German actor, to the point where the whole German fandom guessed and still is guessing who the heck was supposed to be referenced in the original version.


* The Polish dub of the ''WesternAnimation/{{Shrek}}'' movies are full of Polish pop-culture references. For example, Donkey sings the theme song of a Polish TV drama when Shrek decides to go to the Potion Factory in ''Shrek 2''.

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* The Polish dub of the ''WesternAnimation/{{Shrek}}'' ''Franchise/{{Shrek}}'' movies are full of Polish pop-culture references. For example, Donkey sings the theme song of a Polish TV drama when Shrek decides to go to the Potion Factory in ''Shrek 2''.''WesternAnimation/Shrek2''.



* International versions of ''WesternAnimation/ToyStory2'' replace the American flag waving behind Buzz Lightyear during his motivational speech to the other toys that transitions to the news channel in Al's apartment signing off with a spinning globe with fireworks, and "The Star-Spangled Banner" with an original piece by Music/RandyNewman called the "One World Anthem."

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* International versions of ''WesternAnimation/ToyStory2'' replace the American flag waving behind Buzz Lightyear during his motivational speech to the other toys that transitions to the news channel in Al's apartment signing off with a spinning globe with fireworks, and "The Star-Spangled Banner" with an original piece by Music/RandyNewman called the "One World Anthem."Anthem".


* ''Series/LawAndOrderUK'' uses plots taken directly from the original US show, but often changes the endings, and a few plot points, to reflect British sensibilities. Oddly, it often removes ambiguities that exist in the original show, and adds messages, usually ''{{anvilicious}}'' ones. Sometimes, due to the fact that very few people own a gun in the UK, any time there is a gun crime in the US version, something else must be substituted, which is usually much less dramatic.

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* ''Series/LawAndOrderUK'' uses plots taken directly from the original US show, but often changes the endings, and a few plot points, to reflect British sensibilities. Oddly, it often removes ambiguities that exist in the original show, and adds messages, usually ''{{anvilicious}}'' ones. Sometimes, due to the fact that very few people own a gun in the UK, any time when there is a gun crime in the US version, something else must be substituted, which is usually much less dramatic.

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** Likewise, in ''WesternAnimation/ToyStory3'', Buzz's "Spanish Mode" switches him from Mexican Spanish to Castilian Spanish in the Latin American version. In the version released in Spain, he picks up a dense Andalusian accent.

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