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* MascotRacer: One of their April Fools jokes was mocking up a ''Film/LordOfTheRings'' kart racing game.

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* MascotRacer: One of their April Fools jokes was mocking up a ''Film/LordOfTheRings'' ''[[Film/TheLordOfTheRings Lord of the Rings]]'' kart racing game.


* SecretIdentity: The man behind the infamous Sushi-X character was never named for years, causing a bit of fan speculation about who it was. Later on it was revealed that it was passed between several writers throughout the magazine. David Siller claims to have written for him the first year, then passed it on to Ken Williams.

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* SecretIdentity: The man behind the infamous Sushi-X character was never named for years, causing a bit of fan speculation about who it was. Later on it was revealed that it was passed [[CollectiveIdentity between several writers throughout the magazine.magazine]]. David Siller claims to have written for him the first year, then passed it on to Ken Williams.


* CausticCritic: Every Review Crew member would dip into this for really bad games. The Sushi-X personality was usually considered the harshest critic of the bunch, especially towards Game Boy titles. Once Creator/{{Seanbaby}} was hired as a regular contributor, he took this role over with his "Rest of the Crap" column, primarily covering crummy children's and licensed titles that would not have otherwise gotten full Review Crew coverage.

to:

* CausticCritic: Every Review Crew member would dip into this for really bad games. The Sushi-X personality was usually considered the harshest critic of the bunch, especially towards Game Boy titles. Once Creator/{{Seanbaby}} was hired as a regular contributor, he took this role over with his "Rest of the Crap" column, which primarily covering covered crummy children's and licensed titles that would not have otherwise gotten full Review Crew coverage.


* CausticCritic: Every Review Crew member would dip into this for really bad games. The Sushi-X personality was usually considered the harshest critic of the bunch, especially towards Game Boy titles.

to:

* CausticCritic: Every Review Crew member would dip into this for really bad games. The Sushi-X personality was usually considered the harshest critic of the bunch, especially towards Game Boy titles. Once Creator/{{Seanbaby}} was hired as a regular contributor, he took this role over with his "Rest of the Crap" column, primarily covering crummy children's and licensed titles that would not have otherwise gotten full Review Crew coverage.


* DependingOnTheWriter: After several review staff changes, the character reviewer, Sushi-X, who famously despised turn-based RPGs and pretty much anything on the Game Boy, lightened up on both, famously giving Pokemon Red and Blue Versions a 9 out of 10.

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* DependingOnTheWriter: After several review staff changes, the character reviewer, Sushi-X, who famously despised turn-based RPGs {{Role Playing Game}}s and pretty much anything on the Game Boy, lightened up on both, famously giving Pokemon Red and Blue Versions a 9 out of 10.


* CausticCritic: Every Review Crew member would dip into this for really bad games.

to:

* CausticCritic: Every Review Crew member would dip into this for really bad games. The Sushi-X personality was usually considered the harshest critic of the bunch, especially towards Game Boy titles.
* DependingOnTheWriter: After several review staff changes, the character reviewer, Sushi-X, who famously despised turn-based RPGs and pretty much anything on the Game Boy, lightened up on both, famously giving Pokemon Red and Blue Versions a 9 out of 10.

Added DiffLines:

* SecretIdentity: The man behind the infamous Sushi-X character was never named for years, causing a bit of fan speculation about who it was. Later on it was revealed that it was passed between several writers throughout the magazine. David Siller claims to have written for him the first year, then passed it on to Ken Williams.

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* BrokeTheRatingScale: Their review of the infamous ''Mortal Kombat Advance'', an atrocious port of Ultimate Mortal Kombat 3 for the Game Boy Advance. They couldn't find anything positive to say about the game, so it was the first game in their magazine to have the dishonor of earning a 0 out of 10.

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* HostileShowTakeover: Their August 2000 issue's EGM Fall Preview feature (rebranded as ''Hsu & Chan's Fall Preview-O-Rama!'') has the entire magazine staff being held hostage or forced into hiding by the cast of the Hsu & Chan comics featured in the magazine.


* FourPointScale: Averted, they were well-known for using the entire scale, and having four (eventually) three reviewers per game casted a wider net of scores. In 1998, the magazine retooled the score of 10 after they went three years without a reviewer giving one (since 1994's ''SonicAndKnuckles''). A 10 was originally defined as perfect, but since there was no point in having a ten-point system if they were only going to use nine and one could find faults in any game if they wanted, the philosophy changed to where a 10 would represent the gold standard of gaming. The first month with this scale, ''{{Tekken}} 3'', scored a 10 from three out of four editors[[note]]the lone exception being Sushi-X, who gave it a 9 but said no button mashing fighting game would get a 10 from him[[/note]], and later that year, ''MetalGearSolid'' and ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime'' became the first games to score 10s from all its reviewers.

to:

* FourPointScale: Averted, they were well-known for using the entire scale, and having four (eventually) three reviewers per game casted a wider net of scores. In 1998, the magazine retooled the score of 10 after they went three years without a reviewer giving one (since 1994's ''SonicAndKnuckles'').''VideoGame/SonicAndKnuckles''). A 10 was originally defined as perfect, but since there was no point in having a ten-point system if they were only going to use nine and one could find faults in any game if they wanted, the philosophy changed to where a 10 would represent the gold standard of gaming. The first month with this scale, ''{{Tekken}} ''VideoGame/{{Tekken}} 3'', scored a 10 from three out of four editors[[note]]the lone exception being Sushi-X, who gave it a 9 but said no button mashing fighting game would get a 10 from him[[/note]], and later that year, ''MetalGearSolid'' ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'' and ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime'' became the first games to score 10s from all its reviewers.


'''''Electronic Gaming Monthly''''' (often abbreviated to '''''EGM''''') is an American video game magazine published by EGM Media, LLC. It was originally published by Sendai Publications and later by Ziff Davis as part of the 1UP Network. It released 12 issues a year (and an occasional extra "13th" issue for the Christmas season, also known as the "Smarch" issue, a reference to the "Treehouse of Horror VI" episode of The Simpsons).

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'''''Electronic ''Electronic Gaming Monthly''''' Monthly'' (often abbreviated to '''''EGM''''') ''EGM'') is an American video game magazine published by EGM Media, LLC. It was originally published by Sendai Publications and later by Ziff Davis as part of the 1UP Network. It released 12 issues a year (and an occasional extra "13th" issue for the Christmas season, also known as the "Smarch" issue, a reference to the "Treehouse of Horror VI" episode of The Simpsons).



Any and all tropes and trivia for Hsu & Chan (even the comic's EGM run) can be found on [[HsuAndChan its own page.]]

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Any and all tropes and trivia for Hsu & Chan ''ComicStrip/HsuAndChan'' (even the comic's EGM run) can be found on [[HsuAndChan its own page.]]
page.



!!Tropes In Use:

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!!Tropes In Use:!!Tropes:

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* MascotRacer: One of their April Fools jokes was mocking up a ''Film/LordOfTheRings'' kart racing game.


* AprilFoolsDay: Oh, boy. Every April issue has a trick. And there are ''still'' people who fall for the articles and write in angry letters.

to:

* AprilFoolsDay: Oh, boy. Every April issue has a trick. And there are ''still'' people who fall for the articles and write in angry letters.


* FourPointScale: Averted, they were well-known for using the entire scale, and having four (eventually) three reviewers per game casted a wider net of scores. In 1998, the magazine retooled the score of 10 after they went three years without a reviewer giving one (since 1994's ''SonicAndKnuckles''). A 10 was originally defined as perfect, but since there was no point in having a ten-point system if they were only going to use nine and one could find faults in any game if they wanted, the philosophy changed to where a 10 would represent the gold standard of gaming. The first month with this scale, ''{{Tekken}} 3'', scored a 10 from three out of four editors[[note]]the lone exception being Sushi-X, who gave it a 9 but said no button mashing fighting game would get a 10 from him[[/note]], and later that year, ''MetalGearSolid'' and ''TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime'' became the first games to score 10s from all its reviewers.

to:

* FourPointScale: Averted, they were well-known for using the entire scale, and having four (eventually) three reviewers per game casted a wider net of scores. In 1998, the magazine retooled the score of 10 after they went three years without a reviewer giving one (since 1994's ''SonicAndKnuckles''). A 10 was originally defined as perfect, but since there was no point in having a ten-point system if they were only going to use nine and one could find faults in any game if they wanted, the philosophy changed to where a 10 would represent the gold standard of gaming. The first month with this scale, ''{{Tekken}} 3'', scored a 10 from three out of four editors[[note]]the lone exception being Sushi-X, who gave it a 9 but said no button mashing fighting game would get a 10 from him[[/note]], and later that year, ''MetalGearSolid'' and ''TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime'' ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime'' became the first games to score 10s from all its reviewers.


* TheSmurfettePrinciple: Jeanne Kim as the lone regular reviewer on the Review Crew, followed by Jennifer Tsao.

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* TheSmurfettePrinciple: Jeanne Kim as the lone regular female reviewer on the Review Crew, followed by Jennifer Tsao.

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