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History Literature / TheStrangeCaseOfDrJekyllAndMrHyde

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* [[LoveInterest Love Interests]]: Jekyll's good girl fiancée and Hyde's promiscuous barmaid/prostitute girlfriend. This plot thread, not part of the original story, occurs in almost all adaptations--in the book no women have major roles.

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* [[LoveInterest Love Interests]]: LoveInterest: Jekyll's good girl fiancée and Hyde's promiscuous barmaid/prostitute girlfriend. This plot thread, not part of the original story, occurs in almost all adaptations--in the book no women have major roles.


* [[LoveInterest Love Interests]]: Jekyll's good girl fiancée and Hyde's slutty barmaid/prostitute girlfriend. This plot thread, not part of the original story, occurs in almost all adaptations--in the book no women have major roles.

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* [[LoveInterest Love Interests]]: Jekyll's good girl fiancée and Hyde's slutty promiscuous barmaid/prostitute girlfriend. This plot thread, not part of the original story, occurs in almost all adaptations--in the book no women have major roles.

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* {{Tuckerization}}: Stevenson named Jekyll after his friend Walter Jekyll, whose sister Gertrude became one of the most famous gardeners of her generation.


* ''Film/TheNuttyProfessor'' (both Creator/JerryLewis' and Creator/EddieMurphy's versions) are comedic takes on the concept, where a nerdy scientist changes into a cool guy.

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* ''Film/TheNuttyProfessor'' ''Film/{{The Nutty Professor|1963}}'' (both Creator/JerryLewis' and Creator/EddieMurphy's versions) [[Film/TheNuttyProfessor1996 versions]]) are comedic takes on the concept, where a nerdy scientist changes into a cool guy.

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* A theater play by Nick Lane where Jekyll is physically weak but good and Hyde is powerful and strong but evil, also featuring Eleanor O'Donnell, a celebrated, smart singer who urges Jekyll on in his experiments despite knowing their potential outcome.


** In chapter 1, the door of a house is described as sinister: it ''was blistered and distained'', ''and bore in every feature, the marks of prolonged and sordid negligence''. That's the door where Enfield told Utterson he saw Mr. Hyde enter. In Chapter 2, Utterson goes to the house of Dr. Jekyll, whose door is described as ''with the air of great wealth and comfort'', and he asks the butler, Poole, if Mr. Hyde has the key to the old dissection room. In chapter 7, Enfield realices the first door is the back door of Dr. Jekyllís house: ''Both doors, the sinister one and the comfortable one, belonged to the same house''. Also, Dr. Jekyllís hall is described as ''a pet fancy ofÖ the doctorís; and Utterson himself was wont to speak of it as the pleasantest room in London''. Constrasting the old dissection room is described as: ''the tables laden with chemical apparatus, the floor strewn with crates and littered with packing straw, and the light falling dimly through the foggy cupola''.

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** In chapter 1, the door of a house is described as sinister: it ''was blistered and distained'', ''and bore in every feature, the marks of prolonged and sordid negligence''. That's the door where Enfield told Utterson he saw Mr. Hyde enter. In Chapter 2, Utterson goes to the house of Dr. Jekyll, whose door is described as ''with the air of great wealth and comfort'', and he asks the butler, Poole, if Mr. Hyde has the key to the old dissection room. In chapter 7, Enfield realices realizes the first door is the back door of Dr. Jekyllís house: ''Both doors, the sinister one and the comfortable one, belonged to the same house''. Also, Dr. Jekyllís hall is described as ''a pet fancy ofÖ the doctorís; and Utterson himself was wont to speak of it as the pleasantest room in London''. Constrasting the old dissection room is described as: ''the tables laden with chemical apparatus, the floor strewn with crates and littered with packing straw, and the light falling dimly through the foggy cupola''.


* HigherSelf: The FantasticDrug Dr. Jekyll drinks allows him to "dissapear" his Higherself, letting only the lower self, Mr. Hyde.

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* HigherSelf: The FantasticDrug Dr. Jekyll drinks allows him to "dissapear" "disappear" his Higherself, letting only the lower self, Mr. Hyde.

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* ''Franchise/FateSeries'':
** In ''Anime/FatePrototype: Fragments of Sky Silver'', they are summoned as a Berserker Servant with Hyde as the dominant personality. In his Hyde form, he resembles a werewolf and is completely uncontrollable, while his Jekyll form is a mild mannered man who says he developed the potion because he wanted to be a hero, only for it to go wrong.
** In ''VideoGame/FateGrandOrder'', they are summoned as an Assassin Servant with Jekyll as the dominant personality. His Jekyll form is a mild mannered man who reluctantly fights with a knife, while his Hyde form, while looking human and able to communicate, fights like a Berserker.

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* HigherSelf: The FantasticDrug Dr. Jekyll drinks allows him to "dissapear" his Higherself, letting only the lower self, Mr. Hyde.


** In chapter 1, the door of a house is described as sinister: it ''was blistered and distained'', ''and bore in every feature, the marks of prolonged and sordid negligence''. That's the door where Enfield told Utterson he saw Mr. Hyde enter. In Chapter 2, Utterson goes to the house of Dr. Jekyll, whose door is described as ''with the air of great wealth and comfort'', and he asks the butler, Poole, if Mr. Hyde has the key to the old dissection room. In chapter 7, Enfield realices the first door is the back door of Dr. Jekyllís house: ''Both doors, the sinister one and the comfortable one, belonged to the same house''.

to:

** In chapter 1, the door of a house is described as sinister: it ''was blistered and distained'', ''and bore in every feature, the marks of prolonged and sordid negligence''. That's the door where Enfield told Utterson he saw Mr. Hyde enter. In Chapter 2, Utterson goes to the house of Dr. Jekyll, whose door is described as ''with the air of great wealth and comfort'', and he asks the butler, Poole, if Mr. Hyde has the key to the old dissection room. In chapter 7, Enfield realices the first door is the back door of Dr. Jekyllís house: ''Both doors, the sinister one and the comfortable one, belonged to the same house''. Also, Dr. Jekyllís hall is described as ''a pet fancy ofÖ the doctorís; and Utterson himself was wont to speak of it as the pleasantest room in London''. Constrasting the old dissection room is described as: ''the tables laden with chemical apparatus, the floor strewn with crates and littered with packing straw, and the light falling dimly through the foggy cupola''.


** In chapter 1, the door of a house is described as sinister: it '''was blistered and distained''', '''and bore in every feature, the marks of prolonged and sordid negligence'''. That's the door where Enfield told Utterson he saw Mr. Hyde enter. In Chapter 2, Utterson goes to the house of Dr. Jekyll, whose door is described as '''with the air of great wealth and comfort''', and he asks the butler, Poole, if Mr. Hyde has the key to the old dissection room. In chapter 7, Enfield realices the first door is the back door of Dr. Jekyllís house: '''Both doors, the sinister one and the comfortable one, belonged to the same house'''.

to:

** In chapter 1, the door of a house is described as sinister: it '''was ''was blistered and distained''', '''and distained'', ''and bore in every feature, the marks of prolonged and sordid negligence'''.negligence''. That's the door where Enfield told Utterson he saw Mr. Hyde enter. In Chapter 2, Utterson goes to the house of Dr. Jekyll, whose door is described as '''with ''with the air of great wealth and comfort''', comfort'', and he asks the butler, Poole, if Mr. Hyde has the key to the old dissection room. In chapter 7, Enfield realices the first door is the back door of Dr. Jekyllís house: '''Both ''Both doors, the sinister one and the comfortable one, belonged to the same house'''.house''.


* {{Foreshadowing}}: The first hint we have of Jekyll and Hyde being the same is the handwriting of a letter. The idea is that Utterson has been told by Jekyll that the letter, supposedly written by Hyde, was handed in soon after the murder of the politican, but Jekyll's butler says nothing has been delivered in such a manner recently. Utterson's clerk then notices that the handwriting of Jekyll is similar to the handwriting in the letter. [[RightForTheWrongReasons Utterson's first thoughts are that Jekyll faked the letter to hide Hyde.]]

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* {{Foreshadowing}}: {{Foreshadowing}}:
**
The first hint we have of Jekyll and Hyde being the same is the handwriting of a letter. The idea is that Utterson has been told by Jekyll that the letter, supposedly written by Hyde, was handed in soon after the murder of the politican, but Jekyll's butler says nothing has been delivered in such a manner recently. Utterson's clerk then notices that the handwriting of Jekyll is similar to the handwriting in the letter. [[RightForTheWrongReasons Utterson's first thoughts are that Jekyll faked the letter to hide Hyde.]]


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** In chapter 1, the door of a house is described as sinister: it '''was blistered and distained''', '''and bore in every feature, the marks of prolonged and sordid negligence'''. That's the door where Enfield told Utterson he saw Mr. Hyde enter. In Chapter 2, Utterson goes to the house of Dr. Jekyll, whose door is described as '''with the air of great wealth and comfort''', and he asks the butler, Poole, if Mr. Hyde has the key to the old dissection room. In chapter 7, Enfield realices the first door is the back door of Dr. Jekyllís house: '''Both doors, the sinister one and the comfortable one, belonged to the same house'''.


--> [[PublicExecution Will Hyde die upon the scaffold?]] [[BetterToDieThanBeKilled or will he find courage to release himself at the last moment?]] God knows; I am careless; [[DeathOfPersonality this is my true hour of death]], [[SplitPersonalityTakeover and what is to follow concerns another than myself]]. [[DeadManWriting Here then, as I lay down the pen and proceed to seal up my confession, I bring the life of that unhappy Henry Jekyll to an end]].

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--> [[PublicExecution ''[[PublicExecution Will Hyde die upon the scaffold?]] [[BetterToDieThanBeKilled or will he find courage to release himself at the last moment?]] God knows; I am careless; [[DeathOfPersonality this is my true hour of death]], [[SplitPersonalityTakeover and what is to follow concerns another than myself]]. [[DeadManWriting Here then, as I lay down the pen and proceed to seal up my confession, I bring the life of that unhappy Henry Jekyll to an end]].end]]''.


----

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--> [[PublicExecution Will Hyde die upon the scaffold?]] [[BetterToDieThanBeKilled or will he find courage to release himself at the last moment?]] God knows; I am careless; [[DeathOfPersonality this is my true hour of death]], [[SplitPersonalityTakeover and what is to follow concerns another than myself]]. [[DeadManWriting Here then, as I lay down the pen and proceed to seal up my confession, I bring the life of that unhappy Henry Jekyll to an end]].


* AdaptationalBadass: The part about Hyde being a diminutive man, much smaller than Jekyll, is usually adapted out. Instead, Hyde is usually portrayed as a burly brute of a man, larger than Jekyll, or the same size. Some film adaptations give Lanyon a larger role, having him be the one to stop Hyde.

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* AdaptationalBadass: AdaptationalBadass:
**
The part about Hyde being a diminutive man, much smaller than Jekyll, is usually adapted out. Instead, Hyde is usually portrayed as a burly brute of a man, larger than Jekyll, or the same size.
**
Some film adaptations give Lanyon a larger role, having him be the one to stop Hyde.

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