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Since Literature/LordOfTheFlies focuses on a group of boys stranded on an island, there's bound to be some HoYay to go around. Albeit, most of it seems to be focused on [[FoeYay two specific boys...]]

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Since Literature/LordOfTheFlies focuses on a group of boys stranded on an island, there's bound to be some HoYay to go around. Albeit, most of it seems to be focused on [[FoeYay two specific boys...boys.]]



* Jack and Ralph undoubtedly have the most HoYay compared to anyone else, considering their relationship is arguably the most important one in the book. Even though they become enemies later, the HoYay never disappears. It just gets much...[[FoeYay intense.]]

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* Jack and Ralph undoubtedly have the most HoYay compared to anyone else, considering their relationship is arguably the most important one in the book. Even though they become enemies later, the HoYay never disappears. It just gets much...more [[FoeYay intense.]]


* Jack and Ralph undoubtedly have the most HoYay compared to anyone else, considering their relationship is arguably the most important one in the book. Even though they become enemies later, the HoYay never disappears. It just gets much...[[FoeYay harsher.]]

to:

* Jack and Ralph undoubtedly have the most HoYay compared to anyone else, considering their relationship is arguably the most important one in the book. Even though they become enemies later, the HoYay never disappears. It just gets much...[[FoeYay harsher.intense.]]



* A minor joke has come to be amongst the fandom that Roger is a Jack/Ralph shipper. The reason for this is due to something that's barely even noticeable: In the book, when the three of them go anywhere, Roger always drops behind and gives the other two space so they can be alone.


** A lot of their dialogue is almost identical to lovers' quarrels. Jack ''hates'' when Ralph favors Piggy over him and usually acts like a paranoid boyfriend who thinks that his partner is going to cheat on him.

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** A lot of their dialogue is [[LikeAnOldMarriedCouple almost identical to lovers' quarrels. quarrels.]] Jack ''hates'' when Ralph favors Piggy over him and usually acts like a paranoid boyfriend who thinks that his partner is going to cheat on him.


Since Literature/LordOfTheFlies focuses on a group of a boys stranded on an island, there's bound to be some HoYay to go around. Albeit, most of it seems to be focused on [[FoeYay two specific boys...]]

to:

Since Literature/LordOfTheFlies focuses on a group of a boys stranded on an island, there's bound to be some HoYay to go around. Albeit, most of it seems to be focused on [[FoeYay two specific boys...]]


** The '63 movie doesn't include this scene, but it doesn't include a similar one where Jack is punishing a boy from his tribe by [[InterplayOfSexAndViolence spanking him with a stick.]]

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** The '63 movie doesn't include this scene, but it doesn't does include a similar one where Jack is punishing a boy from his tribe by [[InterplayOfSexAndViolence spanking him with a stick.]]


* Then there is the hunting scene where a choir boy named Robert pretends to be the pig while the other boys pretend to hunt him. Jack barely lets anyone approach as ''he literally goes on top of Robert, pulls at his hair, and spanks him,'' [[InterplayOfSexAndViolence the scene reminding us of something else entirely]]. It ends with Jack rolling off of him and saying, "That was a good game," while Robert retorts with, "Oh, my bum."

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** After Jack and Roger leave Ralph's group in the '63 movie, there's a scene where they are hunting together. The two grin and look into each other's eyes for a very long time before Roger affectionately flicks Jack's shoulder and they leave.
** Also in the '63 movie: Roger is the one who declares, "Right up the ass!" after he kills a pig by shoving a stick up its backside, unlike in the book, where it's somebody else. HoYay is involved because in the movie Roger says this after a scene change with his hand on Jack's shoulder, making us think for a moment that he's talking about [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything something else...]]
* Then there is the hunting scene where a choir boy named Robert pretends to be the pig while the other boys pretend to hunt him. Jack barely lets anyone approach as ''he literally goes on top of Robert, pulls at his hair, and spanks him,'' [[InterplayOfSexAndViolence the scene scene]] [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything reminding us of something else entirely]]. It ends with Jack rolling off of him and saying, "That was a good game," while Robert retorts with, "Oh, my bum.""
** The '63 movie doesn't include this scene, but it doesn't include a similar one where Jack is punishing a boy from his tribe by [[InterplayOfSexAndViolence spanking him with a stick.]]

Added DiffLines:

** When Jack decides he's not going to follow Ralph anymore, Roger is the first person to leave with him and follows him immediately the moment he makes the decision.


* Although we recognize that this is a little ridiculous, if you [[InsaneTrollLogic overthink and reinterpret everything,]] Jack eventually kind of becomes a {{Yandere}} for Ralph. Earlier on he's already possessive of Ralph and hates when he pays attention to the other boys. He's clearly [[CrazyJealousGuy furiously jealous]] whenever this happens: he insults Simon (who greatly admires Ralph) behind his back and is absolutely ''ferocious'' towards Piggy (who likes Ralph and sticks by his side at all times). After establishing that he likes Ralph and despises Piggy, Jack becomes obsessed with [[RuleOfSymbolism hunting pigs.]] Jack grows to hate Ralph because he is more logical and gets in the way of Jack's violent fixation with power, but even as his insanity grows, it's evident he will let Ralph live if he joins his tribe. In other words, [[{{Yandere}} Ralph can either]] [[HomoeroticSubtext submit to him]] [[IfICantHaveYou or DIE.]]

to:

* Although we recognize that this is a little ridiculous, if you [[InsaneTrollLogic overthink and reinterpret everything,]] Jack is kind of a CrazyJealousGuy (and eventually kind of becomes a {{Yandere}} {{Yandere}}) for Ralph. Earlier on he's already possessive of Ralph and hates when he pays attention to the other boys. He's clearly [[CrazyJealousGuy furiously jealous]] whenever this happens: he insults Simon (who greatly admires Ralph) behind his back and is absolutely ''ferocious'' towards Piggy (who likes Ralph and sticks by his side at all times). After establishing that he likes Ralph and despises Piggy, Jack becomes obsessed with [[RuleOfSymbolism hunting pigs.]] Jack grows to hate Ralph because he is more logical and gets in the way of Jack's violent fixation with power, but even as his insanity grows, it's evident he will let Ralph live if he joins his tribe. In other words, [[{{Yandere}} Ralph can either]] [[HomoeroticSubtext submit to him]] [[IfICantHaveYou or DIE.]]

Added DiffLines:

* Although we recognize that this is a little ridiculous, if you [[InsaneTrollLogic overthink and reinterpret everything,]] Jack eventually kind of becomes a {{Yandere}} for Ralph. Earlier on he's already possessive of Ralph and hates when he pays attention to the other boys. He's clearly [[CrazyJealousGuy furiously jealous]] whenever this happens: he insults Simon (who greatly admires Ralph) behind his back and is absolutely ''ferocious'' towards Piggy (who likes Ralph and sticks by his side at all times). After establishing that he likes Ralph and despises Piggy, Jack becomes obsessed with [[RuleOfSymbolism hunting pigs.]] Jack grows to hate Ralph because he is more logical and gets in the way of Jack's violent fixation with power, but even as his insanity grows, it's evident he will let Ralph live if he joins his tribe. In other words, [[{{Yandere}} Ralph can either]] [[HomoeroticSubtext submit to him]] [[IfICantHaveYou or DIE.]]


* Jack and Ralph undoubtedly have the most HoYay compared to anyone else, considering their relationship is arguably the most important one in the book. Even though they [[FoeYay become enemies later,]] the HoYay never disappears. It just gets much...[[FoeYay harsher.]]

to:

* Jack and Ralph undoubtedly have the most HoYay compared to anyone else, considering their relationship is arguably the most important one in the book. Even though they [[FoeYay become enemies later,]] later, the HoYay never disappears. It just gets much...[[FoeYay harsher.]]


* A minor joke has come to be amongst the fandom that Roger is a Jack/Ralph shipper. The reason for this is because, although it doesn't exactly stand out, whenever the three of them go somewhere, Roger drops behind and gives the two space.

to:

* A minor joke has come to be amongst the fandom that Roger is a Jack/Ralph shipper. The reason for this is because, although it doesn't exactly stand out, whenever due to something that's barely even noticeable: In the book, when the three of them go somewhere, anywhere, Roger always drops behind and gives the other two space.space so they can be alone.


--->'''Peter Brook:''' I remember that, in the longer version, as in the book, Jack and Ralph had an almost husband and wife relationship, I mean, they were great friends--I don't mean that in a sexual sense--they were great friends, great comrades, they shared concerns, and in the film most of that is missing. Those ten minutes or so that were removed, I think it diminished that aspect of their relationship almost to the point of disappearing. I don't think it weakens the story, I think it changes the story, somewhat, and I think that it leaves room for the audience to imply what they will about the relationship between Jack and Ralph, rather than giving the specific intention of the original story.

to:

--->'''Peter -->'''Peter Brook:''' I remember that, in the longer version, as in the book, Jack and Ralph had an almost husband and wife relationship, I mean, they were great friends--I don't mean that in a sexual sense--they were great friends, great comrades, they shared concerns, and in the film most of that is missing. Those ten minutes or so that were removed, I think it diminished that aspect of their relationship almost to the point of disappearing. I don't think it weakens the story, I think it changes the story, somewhat, and I think that it leaves room for the audience to imply what they will about the relationship between Jack and Ralph, rather than giving the specific intention of the original story.


* Jack and Ralph undoubtedly have the most HoYay compared to anyone else, considering their relationship is arguably the most important one in the book. Even though they [[FoeYay become enemies later,]] the HoYay never disappears. It just gets much...harsher.

to:

* Jack and Ralph undoubtedly have the most HoYay compared to anyone else, considering their relationship is arguably the most important one in the book. Even though they [[FoeYay become enemies later,]] the HoYay never disappears. It just gets much...harsher. [[FoeYay harsher.]]


* There's also some HoYay in Jack and Roger's relationship. Kind of inevitable, as they're the two worst boys on the island and Roger is Jack's right-hand man.

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* There's also some HoYay in Jack and Roger's relationship. Kind of inevitable, as they're the two worst most savage boys on the island and Roger is Jack's right-hand man.

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